Latino USA

Archive for August, 2009

Constitution on ICE

In order for law enforcement agents to enter private homes, specific legal provisions must be met. The most common tool used by police is that of a warrant issued by a judge. Normally, the warrant is for the arrest of a specific person at a local address. A search warrant requires even stricter legal guidelines. And police also respond to public complaints at private residences. And if they have reason to believe a crime is being committed, law enforcement have some authority to enter private residences without a warrant.

Prof. Peter Markowitz

Confusing? Perhaps the most important thing about all the rules is the idea that law enforcement can’t randomly come into a private residence looking for crime or people to arrest. This was the impetus for a Freedom of Information Act filed against Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) by legal academics at the Benjamin Cardoza School of Law in New York. This FOIA request documented a pattern of illegal entrances into private homes by ICE agents.

Latino USA’s Katie Davis reports.


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Identification in New Haven

Fr. James Winship. (Photo courtesy of New Haven Independent. Used with permission.)

New Haven, Connecticut is a sanctuary city. In 2007, the town voted to allow municipal IDs for all its residents regardless of immigration status. This caught the attention of anti-immigrant activists, who decried this de-facto legalization that allowed undocumented persons to open bank accounts and get access to city services. And yet not all is peaceful in New Haven.

For some time, the town’s Latino immigrants have claimed harassment by local police. And recently, a catholic priest was arrested and charged with interfering with an officer in the performance of his duties. And what was the priest doing? He was videotaping police officers as they hassled a Latino small business owner.

Aswini Anburajan, a reporter with the Feet in Two Worlds Project, has a profile of this activist priest: Fr. James Manship.


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See Aswini Anburajan’s reporters notebook on her profile of Fr. James Manship from the Feet in Two Worlds website.

Click HERE.

The ‘Clave’ of Jazzing Up Flamenco

In the last 1970s and early 1980s, classical guitarists Al Di Meola, Paco de Lucía, and John McLaughlin fused together a hybrid of jazz and flamenco guitar. They called their project simply The Guitar Trio, and released recordings that took the musical world by surprise. And while all three went on to success with solo projects and other collaborations, the flamenco fusion often defined each of these artists.

Now, a new stage show called “Jazzing Flamenco” seeks to build on the pioneering efforts of The Guitar Trio.

Independent Producer Reese Erlich saw the new show at the Montreal Jazz Festival this summer and filed this report.


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“Jazzing Flamenco” on YOUTUBE.

Immigrants and Community College

Blue Ribbon Mentor-Advocates, a program of Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools in North Carolina, combine families and mentors

August is the congressional recess and a time when Democratic leaders in Washington wanted to have a series of townhall meetings on healthcare reform. But the townhall idea quickly turned into political theatre that seems to have usurped many of the headlines.

Also missing from many headlines is the fact that it’s back-to-school time in many parts of the country. And for children of immigrants still waiting for immigration reform, the prospects of continuing their education are less clear than even healthcare reform.

Take the example of North Carolina, where two years ago, the state allowed children of undocumented immigrants to enroll in the state’s community colleges with in-state tuition rates, only to ban them from campus a few months later.

Producer Lygia Navarro reports.


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Latin American Healthcare and the ‘Human Touch’

Maria Martin is an internationally acclaimed journalist. The founding producer for Latino USA, Martin has reported throughout Latin America. Martin also directs the GraciasVida Center for Media, based in Guatemala and in Texas. And while out of the country not too long ago, she had an emergency that required immediate medical treatment. She obviously noticed the differences in equipment, locations, and resources, but also appreciated many “little things” she believes are greatly lacking in modern American healthcare.


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Latinos and Healthcare Reform

The complexity of the issue of healthcare reform when it comes to the Latino community cannot be overstated. As most people know, Latinos are not a racial group, but rather an amalgamation of cultural connectors: usually by language, cuisine, religion, and geographical commonality. Mexicans and Mexican-Americans comprise nearly two-thirds of all Latinos in the U.S. And some 11-12 million of the nation’s 48 million Latinos are undocumented immigrants.

Dr. David Hayes-Bautista

So, in truth, there cannot be just one conversation about Latinos and healthcare reform. There must be a series of conversations.

Latino USA’s Maria Hinojosa begins that series with Dr. David Hayes-Bautista, Director of the Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture at UCLA’s School of Medicine.

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This extended conversation (17 minutes) with Dr. David Hayes-Bautista contains analysis of the history of healthcare in the U.S. that is not part of the radio broadcast.

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Amor Prohibido

Noami Mena, a San Francisco State student, was attracted to her British boyfriend's strong Catholic upbringing.

Assimilation into the American mainstream, say many social scientists, often takes two-to-three generations for most immigrant groups. A major part of that assimilation can usually be seen in the intermarriage of couples from differing ethnic backgrounds. It’s not unusual these days to find Americans with mixed Irish-German or Polish backgrounds, for example. But there was a time in American history that these groups would rarely intermingle.

So when children of immigrants begin dating outside of their ethnic group, the familial effects can be unexpected.

As part of our ongoing series on Immigration in the U.S., NPR’s Richard Gonzales reports on a growing trend among second-generation Americans who are choosing to date and marry with partners with whom they are “culturally comfortable.”


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From Trauma to Art

While there are millions of economic refugees who have migrated to this country, there are also thousands of others who come escaping more traumatic things than just poverty. New York is home to many immigrant students whose families have experienced war and violence and are otherwise displaced from their ancestral ties.

NPR contributor Jeff Lunden now brings us a story from the International High School in Queens, New York. That’s a special college preparatory school for kids with limited English skills that have been in the U.S. for less than four years. It’s in theatre class where kids from disparate regions of the world find commonality in going from trauma to art.


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Justice Sonia Sotomayor Sworn In

In ceremonies Saturday morning, Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts administered both the Constitutional and Judicial Oaths to Sonia Sotomayor, making her the first Latina to serve on the nation’s highest court. To see video of the Judicial oath, click here.

On Thursday, by a 68-31* vote, the United States Senate confirmed President Barak Obama’s choice of Sotomayor to serve as the 111th Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. She is the third woman to be seated on the Supreme Court.

The voting was along party lines, with the exception of nine Republicans who joined the Democratic majority in voting for Sotomayor’s confirmation.

Latino USA’s Alex Avila reports on the politics of the confirmation.


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* Senator Kennedy (D-MA) was absent from the vote due to illness.

Latino USA’s Summer Music

We present three great—and very different—musical offerings this week to help you round-out your summer listening. First up: Steve Turre, the master of the trombone and conch shell brings his chill vibe to our studio and helps Maria find some inner peace. Then Señor Coconut, the alter ego of DJ Uwe Schmidt, helps us re-align our concept of mambo. And we finish up with a pair of Colombian BMX-enthusiasts (Andres Martinez and Camilo Sanabria) whose break beats and hip hop flows as “Monareta” have audiences cranking it from Bogotá to the Bronx. Enjoy!

Steve Turre


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Señor Coconut


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Monareta


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