Latino USA

Archive for August 14th, 2009

Latinos and Healthcare Reform

The complexity of the issue of healthcare reform when it comes to the Latino community cannot be overstated. As most people know, Latinos are not a racial group, but rather an amalgamation of cultural connectors: usually by language, cuisine, religion, and geographical commonality. Mexicans and Mexican-Americans comprise nearly two-thirds of all Latinos in the U.S. And some 11-12 million of the nation’s 48 million Latinos are undocumented immigrants.

Dr. David Hayes-Bautista

So, in truth, there cannot be just one conversation about Latinos and healthcare reform. There must be a series of conversations.

Latino USA’s Maria Hinojosa begins that series with Dr. David Hayes-Bautista, Director of the Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture at UCLA’s School of Medicine.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

This extended conversation (17 minutes) with Dr. David Hayes-Bautista contains analysis of the history of healthcare in the U.S. that is not part of the radio broadcast.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Amor Prohibido

Noami Mena, a San Francisco State student, was attracted to her British boyfriend's strong Catholic upbringing.

Assimilation into the American mainstream, say many social scientists, often takes two-to-three generations for most immigrant groups. A major part of that assimilation can usually be seen in the intermarriage of couples from differing ethnic backgrounds. It’s not unusual these days to find Americans with mixed Irish-German or Polish backgrounds, for example. But there was a time in American history that these groups would rarely intermingle.

So when children of immigrants begin dating outside of their ethnic group, the familial effects can be unexpected.

As part of our ongoing series on Immigration in the U.S., NPR’s Richard Gonzales reports on a growing trend among second-generation Americans who are choosing to date and marry with partners with whom they are “culturally comfortable.”


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

From Trauma to Art

While there are millions of economic refugees who have migrated to this country, there are also thousands of others who come escaping more traumatic things than just poverty. New York is home to many immigrant students whose families have experienced war and violence and are otherwise displaced from their ancestral ties.

NPR contributor Jeff Lunden now brings us a story from the International High School in Queens, New York. That’s a special college preparatory school for kids with limited English skills that have been in the U.S. for less than four years. It’s in theatre class where kids from disparate regions of the world find commonality in going from trauma to art.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

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