Latino USA

Archive for August 27th, 2009

Constitution on ICE

In order for law enforcement agents to enter private homes, specific legal provisions must be met. The most common tool used by police is that of a warrant issued by a judge. Normally, the warrant is for the arrest of a specific person at a local address. A search warrant requires even stricter legal guidelines. And police also respond to public complaints at private residences. And if they have reason to believe a crime is being committed, law enforcement have some authority to enter private residences without a warrant.

Prof. Peter Markowitz

Confusing? Perhaps the most important thing about all the rules is the idea that law enforcement can’t randomly come into a private residence looking for crime or people to arrest. This was the impetus for a Freedom of Information Act filed against Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) by legal academics at the Benjamin Cardoza School of Law in New York. This FOIA request documented a pattern of illegal entrances into private homes by ICE agents.

Latino USA’s Katie Davis reports.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Identification in New Haven

Fr. James Winship. (Photo courtesy of New Haven Independent. Used with permission.)

New Haven, Connecticut is a sanctuary city. In 2007, the town voted to allow municipal IDs for all its residents regardless of immigration status. This caught the attention of anti-immigrant activists, who decried this de-facto legalization that allowed undocumented persons to open bank accounts and get access to city services. And yet not all is peaceful in New Haven.

For some time, the town’s Latino immigrants have claimed harassment by local police. And recently, a catholic priest was arrested and charged with interfering with an officer in the performance of his duties. And what was the priest doing? He was videotaping police officers as they hassled a Latino small business owner.

Aswini Anburajan, a reporter with the Feet in Two Worlds Project, has a profile of this activist priest: Fr. James Manship.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

See Aswini Anburajan’s reporters notebook on her profile of Fr. James Manship from the Feet in Two Worlds website.

Click HERE.

The ‘Clave’ of Jazzing Up Flamenco

In the last 1970s and early 1980s, classical guitarists Al Di Meola, Paco de Lucía, and John McLaughlin fused together a hybrid of jazz and flamenco guitar. They called their project simply The Guitar Trio, and released recordings that took the musical world by surprise. And while all three went on to success with solo projects and other collaborations, the flamenco fusion often defined each of these artists.

Now, a new stage show called “Jazzing Flamenco” seeks to build on the pioneering efforts of The Guitar Trio.

Independent Producer Reese Erlich saw the new show at the Montreal Jazz Festival this summer and filed this report.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

“Jazzing Flamenco” on YOUTUBE.

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