Latino USA

Archive for October, 2010

Roberto Lovato

Another keen observer of Latinos and politics is Roberto Lovato. Recently, he’s been feeling the itch to get more involved in activism and advocacy for Latinos. Lovato sees all the trends out there: tea partiers, swelling Republican enthusiasm, Democratic dissatisfaction with the current administration. But what he really wants to know is how Latinos fit into all this; how their concerns can be addressed not just in the short term, but well into the future. He spoke with Maria about this campaign season, and how Latinos can make long-term gains in or out of politics.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Julian Castro

A unique character among Latino politicians is San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro. Castro is from a family of politicos — his twin brother is in the Texas House, his mother Rosie is a longtime political activist. And he may well be the kind of Latino politician we’ll see more of as the demographics of the U.S. continue to change. He talks with Maria about identity politics and ethnicity.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Maria profiled Mayor Julian Castro for BBC World News America on Monday 1 November. Watch the segment here.

From Voter Turnout to Building Power Outside the Electoral System

The 2010 midterm elections are on Tuesday. This year’s races have been fiery, to say the least. PolitiFact.com, a website which rates the truthfulness of campaign ads, has awarded a record number of Barely True and False ratings to ads across the country. The rhetoric is hot and loud. This week, we’re exploring where things really stand for Latino voters, candidates, and activists.

Our guide to the numbers and the people behind them is Louis DeSipio, an expert in Latino Studies and Political Science at the University of California Irvine. DeSipio has extensively studied how and for whom Latinos vote, and he tells us how Latinos will effect Tuesday’s election and the elections in years to come.

Maria Hinojosa also spent time on the ground in East LA with a group called Innercity Struggle, who have spent this election season trying to register, educate, and motivate Latino voters.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Latino Hip Hop

This week, three Latin Hop Hop acts. All very different, but all influenced by the places they came from and the places they’ve traveled and moved to.

First, Kinto Sol. Kinto Sol is a hip hop act comprised of three brothers originally from Mexico, now based in Milwaukee. They combine traditional Mexican music with the sounds of hip hop and Spanish rapping to produce something entirely unique.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Santero was raised in Central America and spent much of his childhood traveling and performing with his father’s bands. His upbringing makes it easy for Santero to blend a variety of Latin musical styles, and the traveling he’s done throughout America has allowed him to incorporate genres popular in his adopted country. Santero’s an artist, a DJ, and a producer. He lives in Oakland, Calif.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Finally, Telmary. Telmary, born Telmary Diaz, is a Cuban rapper and self-proclaimed “street poet.” Her music forges new ground, while still remaining deeply imbued with Cuba’s rich musical heritage and variety. Telmary has rebelled against the male-dominated hip hop scene in Cuba, and her uncommon music has earned her respect.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

A High School in Queens Strives to Connect

It’s hard enough being a teenager. Really, it is.

Immigrants coming to the United States, documented or undocumented, face a staggering array of extra obstacles. Discrimination, language barriers, unfamiliar cultural traditions, lack of knowledge about social structures, low wages… all of these things, and more, must be confronted by people who move to the U.S. Now imagine you’re an immigrant high schooler who barely speaks English and (remember this: it’s important) one of your main goals is fitting in.

As if high school isn’t hard enough already?

One high school in Queens has fashioned itself into an environment where Latin American immigrant high school students can continue their education in Spanish while simultaneously learning English. They get to focus on academics in a language that they already understand. And the school also teaches its students about practical things, like how to buy a metro pass. The non-English speaking H.S. population in New York City has a 30% graduation rate. Pan American International High School wants to change all that by giving its students a place to belong.

Maria Hinojosa visited the school to find out more—to hear from educators, administrators, and students. Take a listen.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Our visit to the Pan American International High School was produced by Xochitl Dorsey and Mincho Jacob, with help from Cecilia Vaisman.

See some of the students at Pan American International High School. Photos by Xochitl Dorsey.

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

THIS WEEK'S CAPTIONS: Let's...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: In this week's show,…

This Week's Captions: Money...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: From Puerto Rico to…

CAPTIONS

Audio visual notes for the hearing impaired.

Join the conversation

© 2014 Futurov Media Group

Contact /

Your privacy is important to us. We do not share your information.

captcha

Tel /

+1 646-571-1220

Fax /

+1 646-571-1221

Mailing Address /

361 West 125st Street
Fourth Floor
New York, NY 10027