Latino USA

Archive for August, 2011

The White House on Secure Communities and Deportations

Last year more than 400,000 immigrants were deported from the U.S. – a record number. Many were apprehended under a controversial program known as Secure Communities – a deportation program designed to go after violent criminal aliens. Yet, many non-criminals have been apprehended because of it. Now, the Obama administration announced it would review all pending immigration cases and would prioritize the deportations of undocumented violent offenders over undocumented immigrant workers. María Hinojosa discusses the issue with Luis Miranda, Director of Hispanic Media at the White House.


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Conservatives for Immigration Reform

While Secure Communities has its critics, there are many Conservatives who see strong immigration enforcement as a prerequisite for any immigration reform. Many have been supportive of the President’s tough policies believing they’ll lead to comprehensive immigration reform. Maria Hinojosa talks to conservatives, Samuel Rodriguez, National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference President, and Mark Shurtleff, Utah’s Attorney General, about the immigration debate.


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Cuban Rhapsody

Cuba is a place where people and cultures from around the world mix and collide. In the 19th and 20th centuries, those diverse influences were reflected in its music, blending classical European music with African rhythms and even early jazz. Musical styles like the danzon, the son, and contradanza were popular in Cuba and around the world during those periods. Now, master musicians Jane Bunnett and Hilario Duran have taken those Cuban classics and blended the music in a unique style on their new album, Cuban Rhapsody. Maria Hinojosa sat down with Jane and Hilario to talk about the inspiration behind their latest work.


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Josefina Lopez

“This is either the longest suicide note in history or the juiciest, dirtiest, most delicious confession you’ll ever hear.” So begins the first novel from Josefina López.

A young American journalist—jaded by war and censorship—breaks off an engagement and heads to Paris to find herself again. She enrolls in a cooking school in order to get a visa, and it turns out cooking school provides just the sort of spiritual awakening she needed.

López is probably best known for her play (and later, the screenplay) “Real Woman Have Curves.” Listen as Maria Hinojosa talks with López about her debut novel Hungry Woman in Paris.


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Barbara Renaud Gonzalez

Bárbara Renaud González, a native-born Tejana and acclaimed journalist, has written a lyrical story of land, love, and loss, bringing us a first novel of a working-class Tejano family set in the cruelest beauty of the Texas panhandle. Her story exposes the brutality, tragedy, and hope of her homeland and helps to fill a dearth of scholarly and literary works on Mexican and Mexican American women in post–World War II Texas.

Maria Hinojosa talks with Bárbara Renaud González about Golondrina, Why Did You Leave Me?.


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Sandra Cisneros

25 years ago, the world was just beginning to learn about all that goes on at The House on Mango Street. Sandra Cisneros introduced us to Esperanza Cordero and we began to experience, through her eyes, being young, poor, female, and Chicana in America.

Maria Hinojosa talks with Cisneros about life beyond Mango Street.


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The Bronx River

This week – we begin our new series: “RadioNature” by exploring people’s connection to nature and the outdoors. We begin in the Bronx… an urban borough bordered by the Bronx River. It’s the only freshwater river that runs through New York City. And for the majority of low-income Bronx residents, it’s one of their only connections to nature and a break from urban life. (Funding for this series comes from the REI Foundation.)

Radio piece and slide-show produced by Nusha Balyan.
Audio Engineer Matt Fidler.


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Photos: Yasmeen Qureshi and Nusha Balyan.

To find out more about the Bronx River Alliance and the upcoming Upstream Soiree, click here.

 

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Along for the Ride with Damian Lopez Alfonso

Cycling is Damian Lopez Alfonso’s life. Since he was a young boy, he’s been riding the streets of Havana, Cuba… but not just for fun. He’s actually a fierce and competitive cyclist. But Damian doesn’t look or ride like your average competitive racer. We met up with him in an unlikely space in New York City.
Radio story and slide-show produced by Xohitl Dorsey.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

If you’d like to help Damian Lopez Alfonso get to the London Para-Olympics in 2012, go to PayPal and make your donation to teamdamian2012@gmail.com.

Gifts can also be made in Damian’s name at the Achilles Foundation for Facial Reconstruction or the National Foundation for Facial Reconstruction.

To download an .mp3 of the 30-minute program, subscribe to the podcast at NPR or iTunes.

 

Radio Nature is a year-long series that looks at how people of color connect with nature. Funding comes from the REI foundation.

The REI Foundation focuses on supporting efforts to get more young people, including youth from diverse populations, into nature. Through this work, The REI Foundation’s goal is to help inspire the next generation of outdoor enthusiasts and environmental stewards.

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Ray Barretto

Ray Barretto was lovingly called “El Rey de las Manos Duras” – literally translated, ‘The King of Hard Hands’. In this 2002 interview with Maria Hinojosa, Ray talks about everything from the history of conga rhythms to how he and his friend Dizzy Gillespie worked together to create Afro-Cuban Jazz. He passed away on February 17, 2006 at 76-years old.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Ramon Mongo Santamaria

Ramon “Mongo” Santamaria was one of the greatest Afro-Cuban Jazz percussionists, often performing with Dizzy Gillespie, Willie Bobo and Tito Puente. Most famous for composing Afro Blue, his music was symbolic of his deep connection and understanding of the African origins of his rhythms. He passed away on February 1, 2003 at 85-years old.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Mongo Santamaria “Afro Blue” 1984


Uploaded by fortyjazz on May 26, 2010

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