Archive for 2012

RACISM IN CUBA

Since 1959, the Cuban government has combatted racial discrimination. Officially all Cubans had the same opportunities.  But since the harsh economic times in the 1990s, black Cubans complain of increasing racial discrimination. Reese Erlich reports from Havana on this controversial issue.


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Reese Erlich is a best-selling book author and freelance journalist who writes regularly for the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. Radio, Marketplace Radio and National Public Radio.

LESBIANS IN CUBA

After the 1959 revolution, being gay in Cuba was considered counter-revolutionary. LGBT Cubans were jailed and harassed because of their sexual identity. Hear from two lesbians talk about their life on the island since the Revolution.


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Von Diaz is a multimedia journalist based in New York City. Her reporting focuses on immigration, Cuba, and LGBT issues. She was born in Puerto Rico and raised in Atlanta, GA. She is a Feet in Two Worlds fellow, and has published her work on PRI’s The World, WNYC, and New American Media.

CUBAN HIP HOP

While the hip hop movement in Cuba has been developing for many years, women rappers have struggled to make inroads. One of the few to break through has been Telmary Diaz. Though she now lives outside of the island, her music focuses on her experiences as a Cuban woman.


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Telmary Diaz, better known as Telmary, is an award-winning Toronto-based Cuban rapper, musician, and spoken-word artist. In 2007 she released her first solo album A Diario to rave reviews. She made her film debut in “Todas las noches terminan en el Malecon” by Cecilia Araujo (Brazil 2001), and her feature debut in “Musica Cubana” by German Krall (2004). She has also worked to the 2005 Spanish film “Habana Blues” by Benito Zambrano, and contributed the soundtrack of the 2002 Italian film “MalaHabana” by Guido Giansoldatti.

NOTICIANDO: WHEN FEDERAL LAW GOES LOCAL

An Illinois federal judge recently cleared the way for a lawsuit that challenges the U.S. government’s use of immigration detainers which instruct local police to hold suspects until being picked up by ICE, often indefinitely, and sometimes even U.S. citizens. Mark Fleming, an attorney with the Heartland Alliance, the Chicago-based group heading the lawsuit, tells us more.


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Mark Fleming is the National Litigation Coordinator at Heartland Alliance’s National Immigrant Justice Center (NIJC) located in Chicago, Illinois. Mr. Fleming focuses on litigation and public policy related to immigration enforcement and detention. Prior to joining NIJC, Mr. Fleming was a staff attorney at the Inter-American Commission for Human Rights, where he monitored migrants’ rights in the western hemisphere. In that capacity, he coordinated the Inter-American Commission’s investigation into human rights concerns with U.S. immigration enforcement, detention, and due process.

DO THEY KNOW IT’S MEX-MAS?

For almost 25 years, Robert Lopez has been putting on an Elvis suit and becoming El Vez, the Mexican Elvis. Latino USA producer Nadia Reiman brings us a profile of the performer and takes us through his Merry Mex-Mas Christmas show.


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Nadia Reiman has been a radio producer since 2005. Before joining the Latino USA team, Nadia produced for StoryCorps for almost five years. Her work there on 9/11 stories earned her a Peabody Award. She has also mixed audio for animations, one which won a DuPont award, hosted podcasts, and has guest hosted and produced for Afropop Worldwide on PRI. Nadia has also produced for None on Record editing and mixing stories of queer Africans, and worked on a Spanish language radio show called Epicentro based out of Washington DC. She graduated from Kenyon College with a double major in International Studies and Spanish Literature.

ALT. LATINO: ADIOS AL 2012

NPR’s Alt. Latino cohost Felix Contreras wants you to rock out to Latino music as 2012 wraps up. He shares some of his favorite tracks of the year with host Maria Hinojosa.


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Felix Contreras is a reporter and producer for NPR’s Arts Desk specializing in coverage of jazz, world music, and Latino arts and culture. He is also the co-host of Alt.Latino, NPR’s new web based program about Latin Alternative music A part- time jazz musician, Contreras plays Afro Cuban percussion with various jazz and Latin bands. He is a recovering television journalist who has worked for both NBC and Univision.

REVISITING POSADAS

The Christmas story of Mary and Joseph seeking refuge in a strange land has a special significance for Mexican immigrants in the United States. Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa visits Spanish Harlem for Las Posadas, the reenactment of the Nativity story among friends and neighbors.


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COQUITO SUPREMACY

Every year, there is a Coquito taste contest in New York City where the audience decides which is the best of these Puerto Rican holiday drinks. Hear the sounds (and the winner) of one Coquito contest qualifier competition.


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The winner of the Coquito Masters 2012 is Zoraida Graciani. Congrats!

NOTICIANDO: END OF THE YEAR NEWS TACO

Victor Landa, editor of News Taco, fills us in on the deferred action program that give residence and work permits to some undocumented young people, and we check in on a new one-million-dollar scholarship for UC Berkeley students. Plus Puerto Rican prisoners tweet behind bars.


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Victor Landa is the founder and editor of NewsTaco, a website that provides news, analysis and critique from a Latino perspective. He worked as a writer and editor for 30 years, mostly with Telemundo and Univisión. Landa also contributed to the San Antonio Express-News, and he is an adviser on media strategy, message crafting, storytelling and public speaking.

 

VINTAGE CHAVEZ

Cesar Chavez, the late Chicano labor leader, has been elevated to the status of icon, but few know the rich history from which the United Farm Workers sprang. Host Maria Hinojosa speaks with author Frank Bardacke about the complex relationship between the leader and the rank and file farm workers, as documented in his book “Trampling out the Vintage: Cesar Chavez and the Two Souls of the United Farm Workers.”


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Frank Bardacke was active in the student and anti-war movements in Berkeley in the 1960’s. He moved to California’s Central Coast in 1970, worked for six seasons in the Salinas Valley fields, and taught at Watsonville Adult School for twenty-five years. He is the author of Good Liberals and Great Blue Herons: Land, Labor and Politics in the Pajaro Valley, and a translator of Shadows of Tender Fury: The Letters and Communiqués of Subcomandante Marcos and the Zapatista Army of National Liberation.

MICHAEL PEÑA: THE NEW CESAR

We bring you a profile of actor Michael Peña, a Mexican American from the south side of Chicago. Next year, Peña will star in a new film about legendary farmworker advocate Cesar Chavez. Lily Percy reports.


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Lily Percy is a producer for NPR’s Weekend All Things Considered. She has also produced stories for StoryCorps and WNYC’s Soundcheck. The daughter of Colombian missionaries, she emigrated to Miami with her family at the age of five. She lives in Washington, D.C.

50 YEARS OF SABADO

The TV show Sabado Gigante has been a staple of Spanish-speaking households for 50 years. Larger-than-life host Don Francisco talks with host Maria Hinojosa about his first TV experience, his recipe for success, and transcontinental commuting.


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Mario Kreutzberger, better known as “Don Francisco,” is the creator and host of “Sábado Gigante” (Giant Saturday), the longest running variety show in television history –celebrating its 50th anniversary this year– and one of the most successful programs ever aired on Spanish-language TV. Born in Chile, the son of German Jewish immigrants who escaped their country during the turbulent times preceding World War II, Kreutzberger is a distinguished TV presenter and producer, entrepreneur, composer and author who has been involved in virtually every aspect of the entertainment industry for five decades. His fascination with television dates back to the early 1960s, when he pursued an opportunity to work in Chile’s fledgling broadcasting industry. His debut program, titled “Show Dominical” (Sunday Show), aired with limited success and was cancelled twice. On the third attempt, Kreutzberger added a number of new elements, called it “Sábado Gigante,” and began hosting it under the stage name “Don Francisco.” And so, on August 8, 1962, he launched the show that would make television history.

 

REMEMBERING JENNI

Jenni Rivera may not have been known by many people in the U.S.  before her death in a plane crash on December 9. But to her millions of fans, the “diva of banda” was one of them  — publicly dealing with bad romances, domestic abuse and the challenges of raising kids on her own. Host Maria Hinojosa gives us this commentary on the impact of this Mexican-American star.


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NOTICIANDO: NAFTA, DO WE HAFTA?

The impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement on economies, industries and labor markets across the three countries involved is still a hot issue among experts. Dean Baker, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research weighs the pros and cons of NAFTA, 20 years later.


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Dean Baker is the author of The End of Loser Liberalism: Making Markets Progressive, Taking Economics Seriously, False Profits: Recovering from the Bubble Economy, Plunder and Blunder: The Rise and Fall of the Bubble Economy, Social Security: The Phony Crisis (with Mark Weisbrot), and The Benefits of Full Employment (with Jared Bernstein).

He was the editor of Getting Prices Right: The Debate Over the Consumer Price Index, which was a winner of a Choice Book Award as one of the outstanding academic books of the year. He appears frequently on TV and radio programs, including CNN, CBS News, PBS NewsHour, and National Public Radio. His blog, Beat the Press, features commentary on economic reporting. He received his B.A. from Swarthmore College and his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan.

WOMEN AND VIOLENCE: HONDURAS

The UN calls the Central American nation of Honduras “the most violent country in the world.” The violence is fueled by poverty, drug trafficking, corruption, and increasingly, with the involvement of the military and police.  In the past few years, women have become frequent targets of rape, battering, and murder in Honduras. Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa explores the reasons why.


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María Emilia Martin is a pioneering public radio journalist with over two dozen awards for her work covering Latino issues and Latin America. She started her career at the first community public radio station owned and operated by Latinos in the U.S. She has developed ground-breaking programs and series for public radio, including NPR’s Latino USA, and Despues de las Guerras: Central America After the Wars. A recipient of Fulbright and Knight Fellowships, she has extensive experience in journalism and radio training, in the U.S., Mexico, Guatemala, Bolivia and other countries.

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