Latino USA

Archive for June 29th, 2012

SB 1070: BEHIND THE LAW

The Supreme Court’s mixed decision on Arizona’s immigration law prompted both skepticism and debate. The Court ruled against most of the law’s provisions but left one standing–the one known as the “papers, please” provision, which allows state and local police to question individuals on their immigration status. How did Latino groups in Arizona react? Seth Freed Wessler of Colorlines reports. Click here to read Seth’s work.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Colorlines.

Seth Freed Wessler is an award-winning journalist who’s reported on immigration, the safety net, criminal justice and the human fallout of the financial collapse. He lives in New York where he works as an investigative reporter for Colorlines.com and a senior researcher at the Applied Research Center.Seth was recently awarded the Hillman Prize for his groundbreaking Colorlines.com investigation on deported parents who lose their children to foster care. In April, he was in the Supreme Court for oral arguments in Arizona v. United States, the SB 1070 case.

SB 1070: BEYOND THE LAW

What does the “papers, please” provision of SB 1070 mean for Latinos? Anthony Romero, the executive director for the American Civil Liberties Union, talks to host Maria Hinojosa and outlines how the Supreme Court ruled on Arizona immigration law SB 1070, why he considers it legalized racial profiling, as well as next steps on the community and legal fronts.


Click here to download this week’s show. Photo courtesy of Favianna Rodriguez.

Anthony D. Romero is the Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union, the nation’s premier defender of liberty and individual freedom. He took the helm of the organization just four days before the September 11, 2001 attacks.  Romero also led the ACLU in establishing the John Adams Project, a joint effort with the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers to assist the under-resourced military defense lawyers in the Guantánamo military commissions. Born in New York City to parents who hailed from Puerto Rico, Romero was the first in his family to graduate from high school. He is a graduate of Stanford University Law School and Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public Policy and International Affairs. He is a member of the New York Bar Association and has sat on numerous nonprofit boards.

A Tree Grows in Watts

Urban grit and natural beauty exist side by side in a community garden in LA’s Jordan Downs Housing projects. Go on an audio tour of this garden as part of Latino USA’s Radio Nature series.

RadioNature is a year-long series that looks at how people of color connect with nature. Funding comes from the REI Foundation.


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To see an audio slideshow, click below. You can make it full-screen to see it better:

Tena Rubio is an award-winning radio journalist based in San Francisco and Los Angeles. She’s a frequent contributor to NPR’s Latino USA and is the former host & executive producer of the nationally-syndicated show Making Contact. A former TV news writer and producer, she is currently a member of the board of directors for the Association of Independents in Radio (AIR).

 

 

 

 

 

Blair Wells is a Los Angeles-based photographer whose journey with camera-in-hand began in 2002, using throw-away Kodaks to visually articulate his experience living in Central L.A. His love of documentary photography has led him to capture the face and heart of social issues, including projects featuring post-Katrina New Orleans day-workers, the everyday moments of a Santa Barbara homeless family and health issues of kids living near the Port of Los Angeles. Blair has also organized participatory photography projects involving the deaf community, as well as teenagers with autism. His projects have given participants an opportunity to express themselves in new and profound ways. Through it all, the human condition — the struggles and successes of everyday people — remains the single most compelling subject of his work.

 

 

 

 

 

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Hinojosa on SB 1070

This week, host Maria Hinojosa shares her thoughts, hopes and fears about the Supreme Court decision.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Noticiando: NALEO In Review

The annual convention for the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials is a who’s who of Latino political influencers, and a good place for politicians to test the waters on the Latino vote. The convention this year was in Orlando, Florida, a hotly contested state. We speak with political reporter and analyst Pilar Marrero from the newspaper La Opinión, who attended the convention, about the stump speeches and surprises there.


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Pilar Marrero is a journalist who for 25 years has extensively covered the areas of city government, immigration and state and national politics. She works for La Opinión as a senior reporter and it’s a regular commentator for radio and television in both spanish and english media. She´s the author of “El Despertar del Sueño Americano” published by Penguing Books and now on sale. The english version of the book, Killing the American Dream, comes out October 2 published by Pallgrave McMillan. Marrero lives in Los Angeles.

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