Show Buttons
Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkdin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Hide Buttons

Archive for June, 2012

Thoughts on Mexican Elections

Writer Daniel Hernandez was already disappointed in US politics when he moved to his parents’ home country of Mexico almost five years ago. Now that he is registered to vote in Mexico for the first time he has found old problems in the political system of his new home.

Click here to download this week’s show. Photo courtesy of The Americas Program.

Daniel Hernandez is a freelance journalist based in Mexico City and a news assistant in the Los Angeles Times bureau in Mexico. He’s been a staff writer at the L.A. Times and LA Weekly. A native of San Diego, Calif., Daniel is author of the 2011 book “Down & Delirious in Mexico City.”

Yo Soy 132: The Mexican Spring

At a private university in Mexico City, students protested a talk by presidential candidate Enrique Peña Nieto on May 11, and were accused of being agitators for hire by media outlets. One hundred and thirty one of the students involved posted videos identifying themselves as genuine students and sparked a series of large protests against media influence on elections and other political irregularities. We speak to journalist Luisa Ortiz Perez about Yo Soy 132’s off-campus impact.

Click here to download this week’s show.

If you can follow audio en español, check out this segment featuring Sandino Bucio Dovali, one of the students who is part of the Yo Soy 132 movement talking about how he got involved:



Luisa Ortiz Pérez is an on-line producer and editor. She is the founder of Nova Mexico, an organization that generates digital solutions and communication strategies for social responsibility initiatives promoting social change. She has published in specialized journals in Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela and the United States on political discourses and the formation of identities for indigenous groups. As a producer she has worked for NPR, the BBC, CBC, Yahoo! Latin America and

Teach A Man To Fish

For Michael McDaniel, fishing runs in the family. He grew up fishing with his grandfather and now he takes his sons to the same spot where he would swing bait when he was little. Reporter Lauren Whaley takes us out on a fishing trip with Michael’s family.

Click here to download this week’s show.
Check out other Californian families that also bond through fishing below:

Lauren M. Whaley is a multimedia journalist based in Los Angeles. She produces audio, photography, video and written stories on topics ranging from childbirth trends to healthcare for low-income seniors. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times and Outside Magazine as well as on KQED Public Radio and Southern California Public Radio. She serves on the board of the Journalism & Women Symposium (JAWS) and lives with her husband Jake de Grazia, also a radio journalist and photographer.

Blair Wells is a Los Angeles-based photographer whose journey with camera-in-hand began in 2002, using throw-away Kodaks to visually articulate his experience living in Central L.A. His love of documentary photography has led him to capture the face and heart of social issues, including projects featuring post-Katrina New Orleans day-workers, the everyday moments of a Santa Barbara homeless family and health issues of kids living near the Port of Los Angeles. Blair has also organized participatory photography projects involving the deaf community, as well as teenagers with autism. His projects have given participants an opportunity to express themselves in new and profound ways. Through it all, the human condition — the struggles and successes of everyday people — remains the single most compelling subject of his work.

Know Your Pro: What’s Cooking in Graciela’s Kitchen?

Find out the Mexican secret for perfect French pastries from Graciela Gamero. She has been baking apple pies, croissants and other French pastries at the Medici Bakery in President Barack Obama’s old Chicago neighborhood of Hyde Park for 25 years.

Do you know a pro we should know?

We’re looking for people with uncommon jobs: tightrope walkers, road kill disposers, chewing gum testers. We’d love to hear your suggestions for people we should profile. You can write us online, in the comments below; send us an email at; or call our listener line at 646-571-1228.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Graciela Gamero was born in the Durango province of Mexico and has lived in Chicago, Illinois, for over 30 years. She has worked as a baker at Hyde Park’s Medici Bakery for 25 years. She attributes her long tenure at the Medici to its late owner Hans Morsbach, who believed in her.


March 9 was a notorious day in El Salvador: two of the country’s largest gangs, MS 13 and 18th street, called for a truce to stop the violence that has turned the country into one of the most dangerous places in the world. Since the agreement took place, there have been reports of a 60 percent drop in homicides. We speak to Alex Sanchez, director of Los Angeles based Homies Unidos and former MS 13 member.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Alex Sanchez is an internationally recognized peacemaker and co-founder of Homies Unidos in Los Angeles where he has developed and implemented innovative violence prevention and intervention programs since 1998 and has also lead the organization as Executive Director since 2006.He has been sought out to consult with academics, journalists, filmmakers, elected officials, non-profit agencies and advocates at local, national and transnational levels to address youth violence prevention and intervention and is the recipient of many awards including the Drum Major Award from the Martin Luther King Legacy Association, the Lottie Wexler Award, the AGAPE Award and others.

Private Prison Riot

One guard died and twenty people were injured in a riot at a privately run immigrant prison on May 21, raising more questions about how these prisons are run. We speak to David Fathi, the director of the American Civil Liberties Union National Prison Project for an overview on the private incarceration system.

Photo courtesy of:

Click here to download this week’s show.


David Fathi is the Director of the American Civil Liberties Union National Prison Project. The ACLU project challenges to conditions of confinement in prisons, jails, and other detention facilities and works to end US overreliance on incarceration. From 2007 to 2010 he was Director of the US Program at Human Rights Watch, which works to defend the rights of particularly vulnerable groups in the United States.

Hot Chocolate

We join the party for the 84th birthday of Cuban trumpeter Alfredo “Chocolate” Armenteros, who has defined the sound of Cuban music at almost every major musical turn on the island and in the U.S.

Photo courtesy of

Click here to download this week’s show.

Marlon is a radio producer, writer, and reporter. Most of his work is focused on music, Latin America, New York City and the arts, appearing in several public radio outlets like NPR Music, WNYC News, Afropop Worldwide, and Studio 360. He has been working as a culture and the arts reporter at WNYC (New York Public Radio) since 2010.


In Brownsville, Texas, picking up the Latin American practice of using “promotoras” lets neighbors teach neighbors about the most common health issues. Part of our year-long series on “health heroes.”

Click here to download this week’s show.

María Emilia Martin is a pioneering public radio journalist with more than two dozen awards for her work covering Latino issues and Latin America. She started her career at the first community public radio station owned and operated by Latinos in the U.S. Martin has developed ground-breaking programs and series for public radio, including NPR’s Latino USA, and Despues de las Guerras: Central America After the Wars. A recipient of Fulbright and Knight Fellowships, she has extensive experience in journalism and radio training, in the U.S., Mexico, Guatemala, Bolivia and other countries. Sports Business Journal, among other publications.


Florida officials are purging non-citizen voters from their rolls less than six months before the presidential elections. Does this guard the ballot for eligible voters, or is it a way to keep Latinos, Blacks and Democrats from voting? For a closer look at Florida’s most recent voter measure, we talk to Myrna Perez, the Senior Counsel for the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Myrna Perez is a senior counsel for the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, a legal research and advocacy organization at New York University. She also works on a variety of voting rights related issues, including redistricting, voter registration list maintenance, and access to the ballot box. Before joining the center, Ms. Pérez was the Civil Rights Fellow at Relman & Dane, a civil rights law firm in Washington, D.C.


THIS WEEK'S SHOW: In this week's show,…

This Week's Captions: Money...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: From Puerto Rico to…


Audio visual notes for the hearing impaired.

Join the conversation

© 2015 Futuro Media Group

Contact /

Your privacy is important to us. We do not share your information.

[bwp-recaptcha bwp-recaptcha-913]

Tel /

+1 646-571-1220

Fax /

+1 646-571-1221

Mailing Address /

361 West 125st Street
Fourth Floor
New York, NY 10027