Latino USA

Archive for June, 2012

Rising Republican Star

New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez has said repeatedly that she would not accept an offer from Mitt Romney if he asked her to be on the ticket with him in November.  Still, she could influence the GOP to moderate their immigration policies.  Sarah Gustavus has this profile of a rising political star, part of new generation of Latino leaders.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of The Hispanic Blog.

Sarah Gustavus reports on topics like government, immigration and poverty for public radio and television, most recently as a reporter and host at KUNM in Albuquerque. Her work has aired nationally on All Things Considered, Weekend America, Making Contact, and Tell Me More. She grew up on a cattle ranch in Texas and spent several years developing her broadcasting skills in Seattle. She is currently studying for a master’s in media at City University in London, where her research focuses on news coverage of immigration.

Narcoreels

More films by Mexican and Mexican-American filmmakers are exploring the social and cultural changes brought about by drug cartels in Mexico. We speak about “Reportero” and “El Velador,” two new documentaries that are part of this trend, with Carlos Gutierrez, co-founder and director of Cinema Tropical, an organization dedicated to promoting and programming new Latin American film.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Slant Magazine.

Bernardo Ruiz’s “Reportero” will have its New York premiere at the Human Rights Watch Film Festival on June 21.

Natalia Almada’s “El Velador/The Night Watchman” will be screened at New York’s Museum of Modern Art June 14 through 20.

Co-founder and Executive Director. Carlos A. Gutiérrez is a film/video programmer, cultural promoter and arts consultant based in New York City. As a guest curator, he has presented several film/video series at different cultural institutions, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, BAMcinématek, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (San Francisco, CA) and Museo Rufino Tamayo (Mexico City). He is a contributing editor to BOMB magazine and has served as a member of the jury and the selection committees for various film festivals including the Morelia Film Festival, SANFIC – Santiago Film Festival, The Hamptons International Film Festival, The Asian American International Film Festival and New Fest: The New York Lesbian and Gay Film Festival, among others. Photo courtesy of El Financiero. 

The Historic Sounds of Panama

The U.S. exported Jim Crow to Panama when it ran the Canal, and has sent troops to occupy the Central American nation. But it also brought jazz and influenced its vibrant musical culture. Reese Erlich shows us these musical traces.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of LondonJazz. 

Reese Erlich is a best-selling book author and freelance journalist who writes regularly for the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. Radio, Marketplace Radio and National Public Radio.

Life with Papi

What’s it like to have a father known for being analytical who is suddenly faced with having Alzheimer’s? Host Maria Hinojosa shares a father’s day essay on how Alzheimer’s has changed her papi, and their relationship.


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Noticiando

Puerto Rico is the only place in the Western hemisphere where those charged with rape or murder are still eligible for bail. With an all time high in homicides, a new referendum in Puerto Rico could allow judges to deny bail in certain cases. We speak to Julio Varela, blogger and founder of Latino Rebels, to get an idea of what this referendum means and what impact it could have on the island.


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Thoughts on Mexican Elections

Writer Daniel Hernandez was already disappointed in US politics when he moved to his parents’ home country of Mexico almost five years ago. Now that he is registered to vote in Mexico for the first time he has found old problems in the political system of his new home.

Click here to download this week’s show. Photo courtesy of The Americas Program.

Daniel Hernandez is a freelance journalist based in Mexico City and a news assistant in the Los Angeles Times bureau in Mexico. He’s been a staff writer at the L.A. Times and LA Weekly. A native of San Diego, Calif., Daniel is author of the 2011 book “Down & Delirious in Mexico City.”

Yo Soy 132: The Mexican Spring

At a private university in Mexico City, students protested a talk by presidential candidate Enrique Peña Nieto on May 11, and were accused of being agitators for hire by media outlets. One hundred and thirty one of the students involved posted videos identifying themselves as genuine students and sparked a series of large protests against media influence on elections and other political irregularities. We speak to journalist Luisa Ortiz Perez about Yo Soy 132’s off-campus impact.

Click here to download this week’s show.

If you can follow audio en español, check out this segment featuring Sandino Bucio Dovali, one of the students who is part of the Yo Soy 132 movement talking about how he got involved:

 

 

Luisa Ortiz Pérez is an on-line producer and editor. She is the founder of Nova Mexico, an organization that generates digital solutions and communication strategies for social responsibility initiatives promoting social change. She has published in specialized journals in Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela and the United States on political discourses and the formation of identities for indigenous groups. As a producer she has worked for NPR, the BBC, CBC, Yahoo! Latin America and Esmas.com

Teach A Man To Fish

For Michael McDaniel, fishing runs in the family. He grew up fishing with his grandfather and now he takes his sons to the same spot where he would swing bait when he was little. Reporter Lauren Whaley takes us out on a fishing trip with Michael’s family.


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Check out other Californian families that also bond through fishing below:

Lauren M. Whaley is a multimedia journalist based in Los Angeles. She produces audio, photography, video and written stories on topics ranging from childbirth trends to healthcare for low-income seniors. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times and Outside Magazine as well as on KQED Public Radio and Southern California Public Radio. She serves on the board of the Journalism & Women Symposium (JAWS) and lives with her husband Jake de Grazia, also a radio journalist and photographer.

Blair Wells is a Los Angeles-based photographer whose journey with camera-in-hand began in 2002, using throw-away Kodaks to visually articulate his experience living in Central L.A. His love of documentary photography has led him to capture the face and heart of social issues, including projects featuring post-Katrina New Orleans day-workers, the everyday moments of a Santa Barbara homeless family and health issues of kids living near the Port of Los Angeles. Blair has also organized participatory photography projects involving the deaf community, as well as teenagers with autism. His projects have given participants an opportunity to express themselves in new and profound ways. Through it all, the human condition — the struggles and successes of everyday people — remains the single most compelling subject of his work.

Know Your Pro: What’s Cooking in Graciela’s Kitchen?

Find out the Mexican secret for perfect French pastries from Graciela Gamero. She has been baking apple pies, croissants and other French pastries at the Medici Bakery in President Barack Obama’s old Chicago neighborhood of Hyde Park for 25 years.

Do you know a pro we should know?

We’re looking for people with uncommon jobs: tightrope walkers, road kill disposers, chewing gum testers. We’d love to hear your suggestions for people we should profile. You can write us online, in the comments below; send us an email at info@futuromediagroup.org; or call our listener line at 646-571-1228.


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Graciela Gamero was born in the Durango province of Mexico and has lived in Chicago, Illinois, for over 30 years. She has worked as a baker at Hyde Park’s Medici Bakery for 25 years. She attributes her long tenure at the Medici to its late owner Hans Morsbach, who believed in her.

Noticiando

March 9 was a notorious day in El Salvador: two of the country’s largest gangs, MS 13 and 18th street, called for a truce to stop the violence that has turned the country into one of the most dangerous places in the world. Since the agreement took place, there have been reports of a 60 percent drop in homicides. We speak to Alex Sanchez, director of Los Angeles based Homies Unidos and former MS 13 member.


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Alex Sanchez is an internationally recognized peacemaker and co-founder of Homies Unidos in Los Angeles where he has developed and implemented innovative violence prevention and intervention programs since 1998 and has also lead the organization as Executive Director since 2006.He has been sought out to consult with academics, journalists, filmmakers, elected officials, non-profit agencies and advocates at local, national and transnational levels to address youth violence prevention and intervention and is the recipient of many awards including the Drum Major Award from the Martin Luther King Legacy Association, the Lottie Wexler Award, the AGAPE Award and others.

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