Latino USA

Archive for September 14th, 2012

A Sneak Peek at America By The Numbers: Clarkston, Georgia

One in three people nowadays are immigrants, Asians, Latinos or African Americans and whites are no longer a majority. This shift is most pronounced in rural areas of the country, particularly in the South. This first episode of “America By the Numbers” visits Clarkson, Georgia, where in the last 30 years, whites have gone from being 90 percent of the population to less than 14 percent. Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa goes in search of the new multicultural America in this companion radio story to the half hour PBS television special airing Sept. 21st.

Click here to download this week’s show. For more information on America By The Numbers (and to watch a trailer!), check out our website. And to find out where it’s playing, check out the Need To Know website on PBS.

 

 

Heartbreakers: A Conversation With Junot Diaz

In his last latest work, This Is How You Lose Her, author Junot Diaz chronicles a series of breakups that his reoccurring character, Yunior, lives through. Hear him talk to Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa about this book, bachata, and the inner lives of boys.

Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Penguin.
To hear Junot Díaz reading an excerpt from This Is How You Lose Her, click below:

Junot Díaz was born in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and is the author of Drown and The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao which won the John Sargent Sr. First Novel Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, the Dayton Literary Peace Prize and the 2008 Pulitzer Prize. His fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, African Voices, Best American Short Stories (1996, 1997, 1999, 2000), in Pushcart Prize XXII and in The O’Henry Prize Stories 2009. He has received a Eugene McDermott Award, a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, a Lila Acheson Wallace Readers Digest Award, the 2002 Pen/Malamud Award, the 2003 US-Japan Creative Artist Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, a fellowship at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University and the Rome Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He is the fiction editor at the Boston Review and the Rudge (1948) and Nancy Allen professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Treasure Hunt

Geocaching, a sort of 21st Century scavenger hunt where players try to locate hidden containers using a smartphone or GPS, may seem like the ultimate in hipster playtime. But for our host Maria Hinojosa, it’s an exercise that gives her quality time with her daughter, lets her join in adventures with like-minded strangers and connects her to familiar landscapes in new ways.

RadioNature is a year-long series that looks at how people of color connect with nature. Funding comes from the REI Foundation.

Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of  Flickr (Creative Commons)

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Rhode Island Bolivians? Presente

When the first Bolivian immigrants arrived to Providence, Rhode Island, they also brought the Festival de la Virgen de Urcupiña. The celebration that began with a few families in the basement of a church 23 years ago is now joined by thousands of others who engage in the indigenous dances and Andean rhythms in the heart of the city. Andres Caballero reports.

Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of the Urcupiña Festival Providence 2012 facebook page.

Andrés Caballero has been an active contributor to Latino USA for more than a year. He holds a M.S. in Journalism from the Columbia University School of Journalism, and a B.S. in Political Science from Notre Dame De Namur University. He covers issues that affect Latinos across the U.S., and he has also contributed to New America Media, the Hispanic Link News Service in Washington D.C., and El Tecolote in San Francisco.

NOTICIANDO: Changing Census

Filling out the census can be a bit confusing for those who don’t always identify with the limited options on race or ethnicity. But for the first time, the Census Bureau is considering adding “Hispanic” and “Latino” as a race category. We speak to Angelo Falcon, president of the National Institute for Latino Policy, to see if these changes would help gather more accurate information about Latinos.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Angelo Falcon is President and Co-Founder of the National Institute for Latino Policy (NiLP). Falcón has been able to combine academic and policy research with an aggressive advocacy style based on broad coalition-building and community organizing. He has become one of the longest-serving chief executives of a Latino non-profit in the country.

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