Latino USA

Archive for November 23rd, 2012

SOMOS: HOW AMERICAN ARE PUERTO RICANS?

Puerto Ricans are U.S. citizens but are often made to feel like outsiders. And those residing on the island see their identity differently from those living in the U.S. mainland. The future of the island’s political relation to the U.S. is still in question, but many feel their cultural identity as Puerto Rican first. Part of our regular series of conversations on Latino identity, Somos/We Are.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Explaining Somos

“Somos” is the name of a series that we are starting where we explore issues of Latino identity. We invite you to tell us how you identify yourself by making a video on youtube, posting a comment here, or leaving a message old-school style on our phone (yes, we have a phone attached to a wall!) at 646-571-1228. Don’t forget to tell us your name and where you’re calling us from. And after you post your video, tell us about it here or tweet us! We love hearing from you.

Alejandro Arbona is a freelance writer, editor, and brand research consultant based in New York City. He was born and raised in San Juan, Puerto Rico, where people were constantly under the impression he was an American tourist. As an editor for five years at Marvel Entertainment, Alejandro oversaw, among other things, a series of “Fantastic Four” comic books set in Puerto Rico, prominently featuring Old San Juan, the rainforest of El Yunque, the bioluminescent bay of Vieques, and el chupacabras.

 

Frances Negrón-Muntaner is a filmmaker, writer, and scholar, as well as the director of Columbia University’s Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race. Among her books are Boricua Pop: Puerto Ricans and the Latinization of American Culture (CHOICE Award, 2004) and Sovereign Acts (South End Press, 2010). Her films include AIDS in the Barrio (Gold Award at the John Muir Film Festival, 1989), Brincando el charco: Portrait of a Puerto Rican (Whitney Biennial, 1995), and the upcoming television show, War in Guam. Negrón-Muntaner is also a founding board member and past chair of NALIP, National Association of Latino Independent Producers. In 2005, she was named one of the most influential Hispanics by Hispanic Business Magazine, and in 2008, the United Nations’ Rapid Response Media Mechanism recognized her as a global expert in the areas of mass media and Latin/o American studies. Most recently, El Diario/La Prensa selected her as one of the 2010 recipients of their annual “Distinguished Women Award.”

Ray Suarez joined The NewsHour in October 1999 as a Washington-based Senior Correspondent. Suarez has more than thirty years of varied experience in the news business. He came to The NewsHour from National Public Radio where he had been host of the nationwide, call-in news program “Talk of the Nation” since 1993. Prior to that, he spent seven years covering local, national, and international stories for the NBC-owned station, WMAQ-TV in Chicago. He is the author most recently of a book examining the tightening relationship between religion and politics in America, The Holy Vote: The Politics of Faith in America.  Suarez currently hosts the monthly radio program “America Abroad” for Public Radio International, and the weekly politics program “Destination Casa Blanca” for Hispanic Information Telecommunications Network, HITN TV. Suarez was a co-recipient of NPR’s 1993-94 and 1994-95 duPont-Columbia Silver Baton Awards for on-site coverage of the first all-race elections in South Africa and the first 100 days of the 104th Congress, respectively. He was honored with the 1996 Ruben Salazar Award from the National Council of La Raza, and the 2005 Distinguished Policy Leadership Award from UCLA’s School of Public Policy. The Holy Vote won a 2007 Latino Book Award for Best Religion Book.

ON DUMPING GROUNDS

What can farmworker communities do when they are living next to an unregulated waste dump that’s on Native American land? Reporter Ruxandra Guidi brings us a story about the dilemma of garbage on lands with little regulation.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image by Ruxandra Guidi.

Ruxandra Guidi is KPCC’s Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter.
Guidi has a decade of experience working in public radio, print, and multimedia and has reported throughout California, the Caribbean, South and Central America, as well as Mexico and the U.S.-Mexico border region.

Ruxandra is a recipient of Johns Hopkins University’s International Reporting Project (IRP) Fellowship, which took her to Haiti for a series of stories about development aid and human rights in 2008. That year, she was also a finalist for the Livingston Award for International Reporting, given to U.S. journalists under 35 years of age.

After earning a Master’s degree in journalism from U.C. Berkeley in 2002, she got her break in public radio by assisting independent radio producers The Kitchen Sisters. A couple of years later, she did field reporting and production work for the BBC public radio news program, The World. Her stories focused on Latin America, human rights, rural communities, immigration, popular culture and music.
Most recently, Guidi was a border reporter for the Fronteras Desk, a collaboration between public radio stations throughout the Southwest and U.S.-Mexico border.

Throughout her journalism career, Guidi has also produced magazine features and radio documentaries for the BBC World Service in Spanish, National Public Radio, The Walrus Magazine, Guernica Magazine, Virginia Quarterly Review, World Vision Report, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s Dispatches and Marketplace radio programs.

She’s a native of Caracas, Venezuela.

BOMBA ESTEREO’S BEAT DISNEYLAND

Simon Mejia, bassist from the Colombian electro-cumbia band Bomba Estereo, talks about going independent, aligning traditional Colombian rhythms with hip hop, kuduro and other sounds, and about helping an Afro-Colombian community record its rich musical history.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Generation Bass

Bomba Estereo‘s album Elegancia Tropical is available to purchase here.

Simón Mejía is the bassist of the Colombian band Bomba Estéreo, a psychedelic cumbia group self-described as “electro vacilón” that began in 2001. Their music merges folk sounds from the Colombian Caribbean coast like cumbia, bullerengue and champeta with electronica, reggae and hip-hop. The band’s latest album, Elegancia Tropical, is available now through Polen Records.

Bio image courtesy of Llanero Digital. 

SOMOS: HOW YOU SEE YOUR IDENTITY

We feature excerpts from one of two videos that Caesar Sanchez from Austin, Texas, sent us about his family members’ sense of their identity. The videos were sent in response to our call for how our listeners see their identities as part of our series SOMOS/We Are.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Somos por Roxanne Coffman from Ceasar Sanchez on Vimeo.

Somos por Ricardo Siller from Ceasar Sanchez on Vimeo.

NOTICIANDO: RECESSION RECOVERY

We’ve seen a lot of coverage about immigrant workers being hit the hardest by the recession, but what about recovery? A recent report by the Urban Institute found that immigrant workers are recovering faster than native-born workers despite suffering greater unemployment. For more on the report, we speak to María Enchautegui, Senior Associate at the Urban Institute in Washington, DC.


Click here to download this week’s show.

María E. Enchautegui is an economist with expertise in the area of immigration. She also studies the working conditions of low-wage work. Prior to joining the Urban Institute she served as Senior Economic Advisor to the Assistant Secretary for Policy at the Department of Labor. She also served as professor of Economics at the University of Puerto Rico, where she did her undergraduate work. She holds a PHD in Economics from Florida State University.

Enchautegui is particularly interested in the economics of immigration from the standpoint of the relationship between different population groups in the labor market, the functioning of the low-wage labor market and the factors that promote employment. She has published on the economic impacts of immigration, job quality, nonstandard work schedules, and informal work.

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

THIS WEEK'S CAPTIONS: Let's...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: In this week's show,…

This Week's Captions: Money...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: From Puerto Rico to…

CAPTIONS

Audio visual notes for the hearing impaired.

Join the conversation

© 2014 Futurov Media Group

Contact /

Your privacy is important to us. We do not share your information.

captcha

Tel /

+1 646-571-1220

Fax /

+1 646-571-1221

Mailing Address /

361 West 125st Street
Fourth Floor
New York, NY 10027