Latino USA

Archive for November 30th, 2012

REVIEWING THE CENTRAL PARK FIVE

Host Maria Hinojosa speaks with Newsday film critic Rafer Guzman about The Central Park Five, a new documentary by Ken Burns and his daughter Sarah Burns about a 1989 case where five young men were convicted of the brutal rape of a jogger. This case became a lightning rod about youth of color and violence in New York and in the nation.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Rafer Guzman is the film critic for Newsday. He is also a contributing critic to WNYC’s “The Takeaway” and co-host of the podcast “Movie Date.”

 



LIFE AFTER CENTRAL PARK

Yusef Salaam, one of the exonerated teens convicted of rape in the Central Park jogger case, talks about life after prison and about watching himself on screen in the film The Central Park Five.


Click here to download this week’s show. Photo courtesy of Maysles Institute.

Yusef Salaam was born and raised in New York City. He attended Public School 83, Manhattan East, The Arts Student League of New York and studied art at LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and jewelry making at the Fashion Institute of Technology. On April 19, 1989, at just 15 years of age, he learned that he, along with other young boys were being falsely arrested for rape. Yusef Salaam served approximately 7 years of his life in prison along with 3 years on parole. Now a proud father, Yusef advocates for education, the need for videotaping of all police interrogations, for policy change in the child welfare system & the prison industrial complex, the effects of the disenfranchisement of poor people and its overwhelming effects on their families and the entire community at large. He sits on the Board of the Campaign to End the Death Penalty, the advisory Board for The Learn My History Foundation: dedicated to Youth Empowerment, Education and Change, and is the inspiration behind People United for Children.

THE PRICE OF BURIALS

Many families of immigrants who die in the US shoulder the burden and cost of shipping the remains of their loved ones back to the countries where they were born. Lauren Silverman reports that the costs of repatriation can run as high as $10,000.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Lauren Silverman is a bilingual reporter and radio producer at National Public Radio in Washington D.C. She received the Gracie Allen Award from American Women in Radio and Television in 2005. She worked as a reporter at Michigan Radio while studying political science and Latin American studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She has written and recorded pieces for American Public Media’s Marketplace, as well as National Public Radio’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Among the pieces she has reported and produced are stories on the artifacts left behind by undocumented migrants crossing the Sonoran desert; the changing face of America’s Chinatowns; and the transformation of a historic neighborhood in Compton, CA.

GHETTO LIFE 101

The improbable story of Power Fuerza, the album that laid the ground for the birth of hip hop. The Ghetto Brothers were a gang that brokered peace among other Bronx gangs, took up guitars and combined Beatles melodies, James Brown funk and Santana psychedelic fuzz in a record that sounds like nothing less than a party.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Carolina Gonzalez is an award-winning journalist and scholar with over two decades of experience in print and radio. She served as an editorial writer at the New York Daily News, and has covered education, immigration, politics, music and Latino culture in various alternative and mainstream media outlets, such as WNYC radio, AARP Segunda Juventud, SF Weekly and the Progressive Media Project. The guidebook she co-authored with Seth Kugel, Nueva York: the Complete Guide to Latino Life in the Five Boroughs, was published in 2006 by St. Martin’s Press. She was raised in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, and Queens, New York and lives in Brooklyn, New York.

NOTICIANDO: HUNGER IN AMERICA

Latinos who live in the United States are twice as likely to go hungry than the rest of Americans, according to a yearly survey by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Alfredo Estrada, editor of Latino Magazine, tells us about “No Mas Hambre,” an initiative to raise awareness and encourage people to act.


Click here to download this week’s show.
Register for the “No Mas Hambre” Summit to take place Washington, DC on December 7, 2012

Alfredo J. Estrada is the editor of Latino Magazine, a publication that focuses on politics and culture. Estrada is a nationally recognized expert on Hispanic media who has served on the boards of KRLU-TV, the Harvard Hispanic Policy Journal, and other organizations. He also founded HISPANIC, an award-winning magazine for U.S. Hispanics.

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

THIS WEEK'S CAPTIONS: Let's...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: In this week's show,…

This Week's Captions: Money...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: From Puerto Rico to…

CAPTIONS

Audio visual notes for the hearing impaired.

Join the conversation

© 2014 Futurov Media Group

Contact /

Your privacy is important to us. We do not share your information.

captcha

Tel /

+1 646-571-1220

Fax /

+1 646-571-1221

Mailing Address /

361 West 125st Street
Fourth Floor
New York, NY 10027