Latino USA

Archive for December, 2012

MICHAEL PEÑA: THE NEW CESAR

We bring you a profile of actor Michael Peña, a Mexican American from the south side of Chicago. Next year, Peña will star in a new film about legendary farmworker advocate Cesar Chavez. Lily Percy reports.


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Lily Percy is a producer for NPR’s Weekend All Things Considered. She has also produced stories for StoryCorps and WNYC’s Soundcheck. The daughter of Colombian missionaries, she emigrated to Miami with her family at the age of five. She lives in Washington, D.C.

50 YEARS OF SABADO

The TV show Sabado Gigante has been a staple of Spanish-speaking households for 50 years. Larger-than-life host Don Francisco talks with host Maria Hinojosa about his first TV experience, his recipe for success, and transcontinental commuting.


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Mario Kreutzberger, better known as “Don Francisco,” is the creator and host of “Sábado Gigante” (Giant Saturday), the longest running variety show in television history –celebrating its 50th anniversary this year– and one of the most successful programs ever aired on Spanish-language TV. Born in Chile, the son of German Jewish immigrants who escaped their country during the turbulent times preceding World War II, Kreutzberger is a distinguished TV presenter and producer, entrepreneur, composer and author who has been involved in virtually every aspect of the entertainment industry for five decades. His fascination with television dates back to the early 1960s, when he pursued an opportunity to work in Chile’s fledgling broadcasting industry. His debut program, titled “Show Dominical” (Sunday Show), aired with limited success and was cancelled twice. On the third attempt, Kreutzberger added a number of new elements, called it “Sábado Gigante,” and began hosting it under the stage name “Don Francisco.” And so, on August 8, 1962, he launched the show that would make television history.

 

REMEMBERING JENNI

Jenni Rivera may not have been known by many people in the U.S.  before her death in a plane crash on December 9. But to her millions of fans, the “diva of banda” was one of them  — publicly dealing with bad romances, domestic abuse and the challenges of raising kids on her own. Host Maria Hinojosa gives us this commentary on the impact of this Mexican-American star.


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NOTICIANDO: NAFTA, DO WE HAFTA?

The impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement on economies, industries and labor markets across the three countries involved is still a hot issue among experts. Dean Baker, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research weighs the pros and cons of NAFTA, 20 years later.


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Dean Baker is the author of The End of Loser Liberalism: Making Markets Progressive, Taking Economics Seriously, False Profits: Recovering from the Bubble Economy, Plunder and Blunder: The Rise and Fall of the Bubble Economy, Social Security: The Phony Crisis (with Mark Weisbrot), and The Benefits of Full Employment (with Jared Bernstein).

He was the editor of Getting Prices Right: The Debate Over the Consumer Price Index, which was a winner of a Choice Book Award as one of the outstanding academic books of the year. He appears frequently on TV and radio programs, including CNN, CBS News, PBS NewsHour, and National Public Radio. His blog, Beat the Press, features commentary on economic reporting. He received his B.A. from Swarthmore College and his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan.

WOMEN AND VIOLENCE: HONDURAS

The UN calls the Central American nation of Honduras “the most violent country in the world.” The violence is fueled by poverty, drug trafficking, corruption, and increasingly, with the involvement of the military and police.  In the past few years, women have become frequent targets of rape, battering, and murder in Honduras. Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa explores the reasons why.


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María Emilia Martin is a pioneering public radio journalist with over two dozen awards for her work covering Latino issues and Latin America. She started her career at the first community public radio station owned and operated by Latinos in the U.S. She has developed ground-breaking programs and series for public radio, including NPR’s Latino USA, and Despues de las Guerras: Central America After the Wars. A recipient of Fulbright and Knight Fellowships, she has extensive experience in journalism and radio training, in the U.S., Mexico, Guatemala, Bolivia and other countries.

SQUEEZE PLAY: PERICO RIPIAO

Dominican youth in New York are modernizing the music style called perico ripiao. Adding R&B and hip hop, they make the style associated with the countryside into urban clubs. Marlon Bishop reports as part of our series on Latin accordion music styles as they live in the U.S., “Squeeze Play.”

Our series “Squeeze Play” on accordion music of Latin America in the US is funded, in part, by the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures (NALAC). NALAC envisions a cultural landscape that fully values and integrates the essential contributions of an expanding Latino arts field and its dynamic workforce.


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Marlon Bishop is a radio producer, writer, and reporter based in New York. His work is focused on music, Latin America, New York City and the arts, and has appeared in several public radio outlets such as WNYC News, Studio 360, The World and NPR News. He is an Associate Producer at Afropop Worldwide and a staff writer for MTV Iggy.

FELIZ HANUKKAH

When Austin resident Trina Hernandez found out her family had Jewish roots, it allowed her to ditch the commercial aspects of Christmas she had long disliked and connect to a tradition she found more meaningful for her and her son.


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Trina Hernandez is a busy madre y esposa and legal assistant by day and a blogger, contributor for Latinometro, and co-director for Austin’s LATISM chapter by night. She is also a proud resident of Austin, TX, sharing everything she experiences within the city. You can always find her on twitter (@atxtrina) or on her couch watching too much TV. And you can definitely always find her at home on Sabbath.

NOTICIANDO: MEXICAN MEDIA

Silencing the Mexican media has become a key strategy for organized crime in the ongoing drug war. And it remains so after the killing of 55 journalists and a total of 60,000 people across the country. We speak to Ana Arana, director of the MEPI Foundation in Mexico City and co-author of a new report that highlights the devastating effect of the drug war on the Mexican media.


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Ana Arana is an U.S. investigative journalist and director of the Fundacion MEPI, an independent journalism project based at the Tecnologico de Monterry in Mexico City. MEPI promotes binational and regional investigations. Arana is a former Knight International Journalism Fellow in Mexico, where she trained investigative units at various news outlets. One of the investigative teams at the daily El Universal won Mexico’s National Press Award in 2008.

Arana´s work has appeared in Foreign Affairs, Newsweek, Salon., The Columbia Journalism Review, the New York Daily News, Business Week, and the Village Voice. The Miami Herald, CBS News. She is a former reporter for the San Jose Mercury News and was a foreign correspondent for The Miami Herald in Central America and Colombia in the 1980s and 1990s. She is a graduate of the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and San Francisco State University.

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