Latino USA

Archive for February, 2013

“The Languages of Natividad” with Captions

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Imagine not only not speaking English but also speaking a language like Mixteco—how would you go to the doctor? A new hospital in Salinas has found a fix for this. And this month’s Harper’s features an article called “This Land Is Not Your Land,” about labor migration in America’s heartland. We speak to its author. Are you ready for Oscar weekend? We are! We go Hollywood and talk to acting powerhouse Miriam Colon, who tells us about her starring role in the new film Bless Me, Ultima.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

 

THIS LAND IS NOT YOUR LAND

Maria Hinojosa talks to Ted Genoways, the author of an article in this month’s Harpers called “This Land is Not Your Land.” It explores the roots of anti-immigrant sentiments in the town of Fremont, Nebraska.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Harper’s Magazine.

Genoways_headshot

Ted Genoways is a contributing writer at Mother Jones and editor-at-large at OnEarth. His book on Hormel and the American recession is forthcoming from HarperCollins.

 

THE LANGUAGES OF NATIVIDAD

Many of the new farmworkers in California’s Salinas Valley are indigenous. They speak dozens of languages and often, no Spanish at all. One hospital in the Salinas Valley is figuring out how to provide services in languages like Mixteca, Zapoteca and Triqui. Reporter Lisa Morehouse has this story.


Click here to download this week’s show. 

Image: Dr. Peter Chandler, Victor Sosa, Petra Leon, and Angelica Isidro go from English, to Spanish, to Mixteco. Leon, a Mixteco speaker, plans to give birth at Natividad in a couple of months. Photo courtesy of Lisa Morehouse.

 

Lisa-Morehouse

Lisa Morehouse is a public radio and print journalist, who has filed for National Public Radio, American Public Media, KQED Public Radio, Edutopia, and McSweeney’s. Her reporting has taken her from Samoan traveling circuses to Mississippi Delta classrooms to the homes of Lao refugees in rural Iowa. For the last year she’s reported and produced a public radio series New Harvest: The Future of Small Town California KQED’s The California Report. KALW is currently airing pieces she created while teaching radio production to incarcerated youth.

BLESS ME, MIRIAM

The new film Bless Me, Ultima based on the Rudolfo Anaya novel is out now in theaters. Maria Hinojosa speaks to actor Miriam Colon, who stars as the curandera, Última.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Blessmeultima.com.

Miriam Colon_photo

Miriam Colon Valle is known as one of the pioneers of the Hispanic Theatre movement in New York City. She came to the United States with a scholarship through the University of Puerto Rico and later became the first Puerto Rican to be accepted at the Famed Actor’s studio. She was appointed to serve as the New York State Council for the Arts by former Governor Nelson Rockefeller. As the president and founder of the Puerto Rican Traveling Theatre Company Inc., she produced more than 100 plays.

 

ADDICTION IN NEW MEXICO: LA CULTURA CURA

The state of New Mexico has the highest rate of drug-related deaths in the nation. Hispanics and Native Americans have borne the brunt of this devastation. In Albuquerque’s historically Latino South Valley neighborhood, black tar heroin has plagued families for generations. And prescription opiates have become an even bigger problem. But these days, the community is tapping into centuries-old cultural practices to help addicts find a new path to recovery. The core value here is respect.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of the producer (Megan Kamerick)

For more information on La Plazita, visit their website. You can also check out Casa De Salud Family Medical Office.

 Megan Kamerick has been a journalist for 20 years, working in Milwaukee, San Antonio, New Orleans and Albuquerque. She is currently the host and producer of Public Square at New Mexico PBS. She is also an independent public radio producer and does a woman’s newscast regularly for Women’s Focus on KUNM in Albuquerque. Megan received awards for investigative pieces, arts coverage, environmental stories, profiles, breaking news, radio interviews and her portrayal of women. She was named outstanding small business journalist in New Mexico by the U.S. Small Business Administration’s New Mexico office. Megan holds a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Iowa and a master’s degree in journalism from Marquette University. She is the immediate past president of the Journalism & Women Symposium. Her talk on women and media, delivered at TEDx Albuquerque, is now featured on the organization’s national site, www.ted.com.

WHEN ADDICTION HITS HOME

Professor Angela Garcia has personal experience with addiction. She talks to Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa about her thoughts on La Cultura Cura, her book The Pastoral Clinic: Addiction and Dispossession Along the Rio Grande, and her thoughts on the relationship between poverty and drug addiction.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Amazon.

 Angela Garcia is a Professor at Stanford University. A central theme of her work is the disproportionate burden of addiction, depression and incarceration among poor families and communities. Garcia’s book, The Pastoral Clinic: Addiction and Dispossession Along The Rio Grande (Universityof California Press, 2010) received the 2012 Victor Turner Prize and a 2010 Pen Center USA Award. The Pastoral Clinic explores the relationship between intergenerational heroin use, poverty and colonial history in northern New Mexico.

A PIECE OF A FALLING STAR

New Mexico poet Carlos Contreras works teaching inmates and writes about addiction and poverty in his community. He reads an excerpt from his poem “Falling Star.”


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Just Write. See Carlos Contreras performing another poem here.

 Carlos Contreras is a twenty-six-year-old poet who competed on the team that brought the National Poetry Slam Championship home to his native Albuquerque. His many other awards include the New Mexico Hispanic Entertainers Award for Poet of the Year in 2007. As a high school student, Carlos was accepted into the Voces program at the National Hispanic Cultural Center, a month-long workshop in poetry composition and performance. The next year he returned as an intern and mentor. Today, with a degree in English and Sociology from the University of New Mexico, he is the lead coordinator of the program. He has published poems in several anthologies, and a book, A Man in Pieces: Poems for My Father. Contreras performs solo and in groups around the state and the nation. Bio and headshot care of El Palacio.

WHEN BORDER PATROL CROSSES THE LINE

A new report by the immigrant rights group Families for Freedom and the New York University School of Law Immigrant Rights Clinic found that Border Patrol agents were making unlawful arrests alongside the US-Canada border. We speak to co-author and New York University School of Law professor Nancy Morawetz about the report’s findings.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of The News House (creative commons).

Nancy Morawetz is a Professor of Clinical Law at New York University School of Law, where she co-directs the Immigrant Rights Clinic (IRC). Professor Morawetz supervises students in immigration court, federal district court, the courts of appeals and the Supreme Court. Professor Morawetz and her students also work on a range of projects assisting community based organizations. Professor Morawetz serves as the chair of the Supreme Court Immigration Law Working Group, which monitors cases working their way to the Court and participates in amicus briefing. Professor Morawetz’s writings include Counterbalancing Distorted Incentives in Supreme Court Pro Bono Practice: Recommendations for the New Supreme Court Pro Bono Bar and Public Interest Practice Communities, 86 N.Y.U. L. Rev. 131 (2011); Rethinking Drug Inadmissibility, 50 Wm. & Mary L. Rev. 163 (2008); Citizenship and the Courts, 2007 U. Chi. Legal F. 447 (2007); The Invisible Border: Restrictions on Short-Term Travel By Noncitizens, 21 Geo. Imm. L. J. 201 (2007); Determining the Retroactive Effect of Laws Altering the Consequences of Criminal Convictions, 30 Ford. Urb. L. J. 1743 (2003); Understanding the Impact of the 1996 Deportation Laws and the Limited Scope of Proposed Reforms, 113 Harv. L. Rev. 1936 (2000); and Rethinking Retroactive Deportation Laws and the Due Process Clause, 73 N.Y.U.L. Rev. 97 (1998).

OLD REFORM, NEW LESSONS

Critics of the “path to citizenship” provisions of the immigration reform blueprint call it amnesty and say it will cost the American taxpayer millions to legalize the undocumented. From the Fronteras Desk, reporter Adrian Florido looks back on the 1986 immigration act to see what impact it had on wages and jobs — and what it costs.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Hispanic Nashville (creative commons).

Adrian Florido is a reporter for the Fronteras Desk where he covers the U.S.-Mexico border, immigrant and tribal communities, demographics, and culture. Before joining KPBS, he was a staff writer at Voice of San Diego. There he reported on San Diego neighborhoods, focusing on immigrant and under-served communities as well as development, planning, land use, and transportation. For a year, he delivered a weekly television segment on NBC San Diego.He’s a Southern California native who moved to San Diego in 2009 after earning an undergraduate degree at the University of Chicago. He majored in history with an emphasis on the US and Latin America. In college he was news editor of the student paper, the Chicago Maroon, and also spent time reporting from Capitol Hill and working with the advocacy group Reporters Without Borders.

FROM TIGRES TO TIGRILLOS: RAUL Y MEXIA

New brotherly duo Raul y Mexia debuted their first album, Arriba y Lejos. But the siblings are no strangers to the music scene. We speak to them about their new album and about growing up as the sons of Norteño giants Los Tigres del Norte.


Click here to download this week’s show.


Raul Hernandez and Hernan Hernandez Jr (Raul y Mexia) are musicians and the sons of Hernan Hernandez of Los Tigres del Norte. They first burst into the music scene with a video they made for Todos Somos Arizona in which they spoke out against Arizona’s SB 1070. Their first album, Arriba y Lejos just debuted on Nacional Records. Photo courtesy of Vivelo Hoy. More info here.

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