Latino USA

Archive for March, 2013

This Week’s Captions: News or Noise? The A-Word

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Get ready for our new series New or Noise where we take a look at media matters that may involve misunderstanding or misinformation and help you see the forest from the trees! First up: Amnesty. What does it mean? When did it become a dirty word? Our first News or Noise segment tells you more. Then we take you to North Carolina where undocumented teens are getting specially marked licenses. Is this helping? And we go digital—with an interview about a new web comedy series called East Willy B.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

News or Noise? The A-Word

When did  ”amnesty” become such a dirty word? For our first “News or Noise” segment –where we take a look at media matters that may involve misunderstanding or misinformation— María Hinojosa talks to attorney Allan Wernick about the use of the word amnesty when it comes to immigration policy.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Flickr (Creative commons). 

News or Noise logo final option 2-01“News or Noise?” is a dynamic multiplatform radio project produced by Latino USA to encourage listeners to think critically about the news. Supported by Chicago’s Robert R. McCormick Foundation as part of its “Why News Matters” initiative, this year-long series of radio reports will explore top stories in the news cycle around which there is extensive commentary, misinformation, confusion or misunderstanding. The companion “News or Noise?” online quiz, (schedule here), will ask listeners to put their critical reasoning skills to the test as they discern fact from fabrication about each news topic.

WernickAllan Wernick is a professor at Baruch College and he is the director of Citizen Now program at the City University of New York. He is a published author on U.S. immigration and citizenship issues and he is also a columnist for the New York Daily News and King Features Syndicate.

Undocumented Driving

North Carolina will finally issue driver’s licenses for undocumented immigrants who applied to Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. The only thing is these licenses won’t look like everyone else’s. Latino USA contributor Michelle Johnson reports.


Click here to download this week’s show.

michellesheadshotMichelle Johnson is a multimedia journalist who lives in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. When she is not working, you are likely to find her out with the dog, talking to strangers and collecting stories.

This is Bushwick

It’s a web comedy series about a group of friends living in the fast changing Bushwick neighborhood of Brooklyn. The new season of “East Willy B” premiers March 20th. Host María Hinojosa speaks with producer and actress Julia Grob about the “new generation Latino” sensibility of the show.


Click here to download this week’s show. 

JuliaGrobHeadshot Julia Ahumada Grob is an actor, writer, and creative producer of Chilean and Jewish heritage. She is the co-creator and lead actor of “East WillyB.” Named one of 25 emerging theater artists by Kevin Spacey, Julia has appeared on screen opposite Rosie Perez, Andre Royo (“The Wire”), Jaime Tirelli (“Girl Fight”) and onstage opposite Kathy Najimy, Billy Crudup, and Jason Biggs. Julia is a 2011 Fellow of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers (NALIP), Latino Producers Academy and Latino Artist Mentoring Program. Julia holds a BA from Brown University and has studied acting with the Labyrinth Theater Company, Steppenwolf Theater Company and at Upright Citizen’s Brigade.

This Week’s Captions: Mining & The Women of Guatemala

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Come with us to Guatemala and hear about the many indigenous women there who are involved in clashes with multinational mining companies that they say threaten their way of life. Then travel back to the US to Texas, where an all-girl conjunto group got their groove back. And speaking of grooves—we bring you a taste of Helado Negro and his new record, Invisible Life.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

MINING AND THE WOMEN OF GUATEMALA

Host Maria Hinojosa travels to Guatemala for a report on the many indigenous women there who are involved in clashes with multinational mining companies that they say are despoiling the environment and threatening their way of life.


Click here to download this week’s show.

María Emilia Martin is a pioneering public radio journalist with over two dozen awards for her work covering Latino issues and Latin America. She started her career at the first community public radio station owned and operated by Latinos in the U.S. She has developed ground-breaking programs and series for public radio, including NPR’s Latino USA, and Despues de las Guerras: Central America After the Wars. A recipient of Fulbright and Knight Fellowships, she has extensive experience in journalism and radio training, in the U.S., Mexico, Guatemala, Bolivia and other countries.

GIRLS OF CONJUNTO

Meet the Garza sisters. Playing Tex-Mex Conjunto music publicly used to be the sole domain of men…till sisters Lala and Marcella took up the accordion and the drums. They’re back on the scene after many years. Delaney Hall brings us this story from Stories from Deep in the Heart.


Click here to download this week’s show. This story was reported by Arlette Flores, Jennifer Gonzalez, Roberto Hernandez, and Steven Ugalde and produced by Delaney Hall. It was originally produced for Stories from Deep in the Heart, a project of Texas Folklife

DelaneyHallDelaney Hall is a radio producer and multimedia reporter in Austin, TX. She’s the lead producer of the Austin Music Map, a community documentary project based at KUTX and produced in collaboration with the Association of Independents in Radio and Zeega.

A TASTE OF HELADO NEGRO

Ecuador-via-Florida musician Roberto Carlos Lange, aka Helado Negro, just released his latest record Invisible Life. Hear about his family life, musical philosophy, and meanings behind the new tunes in his own words.


Click here to download this week’s show. 

HeladoNegroHeadshot From the room he grew up in, in South Florida, to his apartment in Savannah, where that restless tropical silent partner, humidity, continued to creep in, and now in his current home in Brooklyn – Roberto Lange of Helado Negro has never not made music. Tones whittled out of these places, memories, time and all its impressions, Invisible Life is Helado Negro’s third full-length album. Like captured light, it is a reflection of Helado Negro’s refined love affair with synthesis, sampling, and his own strengthening voice.

This Week’s Captions: Latinos & Gun Control

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

How do Latinos feel about restrictions on gun control? Is now the time to restrict the right to bear arms? We hear two interesting perspectives on the relationship between Latinos and guns. And did you know that Latino farmers and ranchers sued the US Department of Agriculture and won? The USDA was not giving grants to Latino and African American farmers fairly. And now that the lawsuit is over, many ranchers are not signing up for compensation. Hear that (and Tex-Mex norteño!) on this week’s show.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

LATINOS AND GUNS

As the debate on gun control marches on, both supporters and critics of regulation have raised their voices. But where do Latinos stand on the right to bear arms? New York City attorney and independent columnist Raul Reyes and Assistant Professor of Politics and International Affairs Dr. Stephen Nuño bring you two different perspectives on the topic.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Flick (creative commons).

RaulReyes Raul A. Reyes is an attorney and columnist in New York City. A third-generation Mexican-American, he writes frequently on issues affecting the Latino community. Reyes is a member of the Board of Contributors of USA Today as well as a contributor to The TODAY Show, CNN, MSNBC, NBC Latino, Current TV, NPR, BBC World Service, and FOX News Radio. He is a graduate of Harvard University and Columbia School of Law.

StephenNuno Stephen A Nuño is an Assistant Professor studying Political Behavior, Race and Ethnic Politics, Latino Politics, Mobilization, and Partisanship at Northern Arizona University. He is also a Research Associate at the Leavey Center for the Study of Los Angeles at Loyola Marymount University. He grew up on the outskirts of East L.A., in a multicultural neighborhood called Alhambra.

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