Archive for April, 2013

The Boston Marathon Bombing, “News or Noise?”

For this week’s “News or Noise?” –where we take a look at media matters that may involve misunderstanding or misinformation— we discuss the media’s coverage of the Boston Marathon bombing. To separate the news from the noise, María Hinojosa speaks with Dan Kennedy, journalism professor at Northeastern University in Boston.


Click here to download this week’s show.  Image courtesy of flickr (abustaca).

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Having trouble taking the quiz on your mobile device? Go to the quiz directly here.

News or Noise logo final option 2-01“News or Noise?” is a dynamic multiplatform radio project produced by Latino USA to encourage listeners to think critically about the news. Supported by Chicago’s Robert R. McCormick Foundation as part of its “Why News Matters” initiative, this year-long series of radio reports will explore top stories in the news cycle around which there is extensive commentary, misinformation, confusion or misunderstanding. The companion “News or Noise?” online quiz, (schedule here), will ask listeners to put their critical reasoning skills to the test as they discern fact from fabrication about each news topic.

Kennedy headshotDan Kennedy teaches journalism at Northeastern University in Boston. He is a regular panelist on “Beat the Press,” a weekly media roundtable on WGBH-TV. He is also a regular contributor on media and politics for the Huffington Post, and has written for the Guardian, Nieman Reports, the Nieman Journalism Lab, Slate, the Boston Globe, and CommonWealth Magazine. In 2001, he received the National Press Club’s Arthur Rowse Award for Press Criticism. He is the author of “Little People: Learning to See the World Through My Daughter’s Eyes”. His blog, Media Nation, tracks issues related to journalism, politics and culture.

Domestic Workers and Mediators

In Massachusetts, domestic workers and employers learn to resolve disputes through mediation, instead of in court. Shannon Mullen reports.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Andrew Stelzer. 

ShannonShannon Mullen is a film producer and a freelance journalist based in New England, where she files news and feature stories from around the region for National Public Radio’s flagship programs, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as American Public Media’s Marketplace. Her work has also been published in Edible Boston, Boston Magazine, the Boston Globe Magazine and New Hampshire Magazine.

Peak Shots

We meet Claudia Lopez, the first Colombian woman to summit in the Himalayas. Lopez makes her living photographing world-class climbers, but she volunteers helping injured climbers get their confidence back. Juliana Schatz reports.

This story is part of the RadioNature series which explores the ways Latinos connect with nature. RadioNature is supported by the REI Foundation.


Click here to download this week’s show. Cover image courtesy of Andrew Stelzer. 

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Images courtesy of Claudia Lopez.

Schatz_headshotJuliana Schatz specializes in stories of public health and human rights in communities of color, but her love for the outdoors and adrenaline means she occasionally dabbles in adventure storytelling. Her work with PBS FRONTLINE, GlobalPost and Sender Films has taken her from the peaks of Giza to the sky-high Rocky Mountains.

 

 

 

 

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“Violeta Went to Heaven”

Chilean folksinger Violeta Parra helped revive her country’s traditional music and introduced the Nueva Canción genre to the world. “Violeta Went to Heaven,” a film about the life of Violeta Parra, is now playing in major U.S cities. Latino USA producer Andrés Caballero spoke to the film’s director, Andrés Wood, in New York City.


Click here to download this week’s show.  Image courtesy of Kino Lorber.

Wood.photoAndrés Wood is the director of “Violeta Went to Heaven.” He is also known for “Machuca,” “The Good Life” and “Football Stories.” Wood is an Economics graduate from Universidad Católica de Chile (1988). He also studied film at New York University.

 

 

You crazy? Latinos and Mental Health

Growing up can be an emotional rollercoaster. Where do Latino youth caught up between culture and universal challenges to emotional well-being go for support? We hear from three young Latinos and how they cope with anxiety, depression, peer pressure and relationships. We also speak to Dr. Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola, a professor and founding director of the UC Davis Center for Reducing Health Disparities.

Image courtesy of Nicole Plata.
Andrew Stelzer, Pauline Bartolone, and Jon Kalish contributed to this report.


Click here to download this week’s show.

View our panel featuring these guests and more resources.

sergioDr. Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola is a Professor of Clinical Internal Medicine, the Founding Director of the UC Davis Center for Reducing Health Disparities (CRHD), the Director of the Community Engagement Program of the UC Davis Clinical Translational Science Center (CTSC), and Co-Director of the National Institute of Aging (NIA) funded Latino Aging Research and Resource Center (LARRC).

claudiaClaudia Mendez is a 22 years old student at San Francisco State University. She was born and raised in the Mission District of San Francisco, CA, and was placed in foster care at the age of 16 because of family abuse. After realizing that there were many gaps in the foster care system, Claudia decided that she wanted to be an advocate for her community and help change different systems to better the lives of other young people. She is proudly a San Francisco State University Guardian Scholar pursuing a Bachelors degree in Comparative World Literature and plans to attend law school to become a dependency lawyer. She is also a member of Honoring Emancipated Youth and trainer at Transitional Youth Initiative. Besides school, some of Claudia’s hobbies are photography, soccer with friends and family, and scrapbooking.

nikkoNikko Reynoso is a Chicano trans* activist committed to social justice, gender equity, and anti-racist advocacy. From East Side San Jose, he speaks on issues relating to the intersections of identity, including sexuality, race, gender, and class. He is also a 3rd year UC Davis student studying Women and Gender studies, Chicana/o studies and Sociology.

nicoleNicole Plata is the Youth Initiatives Coordinator for the Mental Health Association of San Francisco. She is a passionate and uncompromising advocate for Transitional Aged Youth (TAY) in the mental health system. Her passion is rooted in her own experience with trauma and is inspired by the investment of her mentors and her faith in God.
She is a native of East Side San Jose, and identifies as a Mixed-Race Latina of Panamanian and Puerto Rican descent. Having overcome a variety of challenges in her youth, from abuse and community violence to involvement in the criminal justice system and a traumatic brain surgery, Nicole offers a well-informed perspective to those she works with. She seeks to use her perspective and experience to advocate and inform services for the diverse youth of California. She does this through her work for the Mental Health Association of San Francisco and her involvement on various Transition Age Youth advocacy groups within San Francisco County and statewide. In her free time, Nicole is an artist and muralist who loves to awaken her roots through salsa dancing.

You Crazy! Growing Up Latin@ and Surviving to 25

 
WHEN:
April 23, 2013
6:00 – 6:30 PM reception and food
6:30 – 8:00 PM panel and Q&A

 
WHERE:
UC Davis Student Community Center, 2nd Floor, 397 Hutchison Drive, Davis, CA

 
This event was part of a series of free public Latino USA events on health in California.

 
 
Watch the recording of this ground-breaking event:

 

Growing Up Latino and Surviving to 25 from The Futuro Media Group on Vimeo.

 
Scroll down for photos from this event.

 
DESCRIPTION:

Surviving the emotional roller coaster of adolescence is a double and sometimes triple challenge for Latin@ youth. Culture and tradition complicate universal adolescent issues like anxiety, depression, peer pressure, and relationships. Youth in immigrant families often have difficulty navigating the different worlds of school and the streets, home and family. Family separations, mislabeling/misdiagnosis, and pressure to “be quiet” further complicate the challenges to emotional well-being. Where do young people go to get support? Do counselors and mental health professionals understand cultural factors? Do they even literally speak the same language?

A panel of renowned speakers explore the challenging ground of growing up Latino/a. Dr. Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola and Dr. Lina Mendez share key findings from a June 2012 study of the landscape of mental health services for Latinos in California. Dr. Luis Zayas shares findings from his 25 years of research on Latina suicide and family separation. Three youth leaders—Nicole Plata, Claudia Mendez, and Nikko Gabriel Reynoso—speak about their personal experiences surmounting the myriad challenges of growing up, coping with (mis)diagnosis, foster care, identity, coming out, family, and themselves. Excerpted recordings from an exclusive January 2013 interview with Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor explore her childhood and coming to terms with family issues.

 
Listen to the radio story:

 
PANELISTS:
 

sergioDr. Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola
Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola, M.D., Ph.D., is Professor of Clinical Internal Medicine, the Founding Director of the UC Davis Center for Reducing Health Disparities (CRHD), the Director of the Community Engagement Program of the UC Davis Clinical Translational Science Center (CTSC), and Co-Director of the National Institute of Aging (NIA) funded Latino Aging Research and Resource Center (LARRC). He has nearly 30 years of experience working in the mental health field as a researcher, clinician, professor, and advocate. Dr. Aguilar-Gaxiola has created a substantive applied research program that focuses on cross-cultural comparative epidemiologic research on patterns and correlates of mental disorders, substance abuse and health conditions; the identification of unmet health and mental needs and associated risk and protective factors in underserved populations; community-engaged approaches to reducing health disparities in underserved populations; and quality of care improvement through the provision of culturally and linguistically appropriate services.

Dr. Aguilar-Gaxiola’s most recent work is focused on translating and bridging research with services delivery and policy development. He has been appointed to numerous policy and research advisory boards, at the local, state, national and international levels, including a four year appointment to the National Advisory Mental Health Council of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and the World Health Organization (WHO). His work has been nationally recognized; in 2005 he was awarded the U.S. DHHS’ Office of Minority Health’s National Minority Health Community Leader Award (Hispanic Community).

  

linaDr. Lina Mendez
Lina R. Méndez Ph.D is a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Internal Medicine at the UC Davis Medical Center, and a project manager for the Center for Reducing Health Disparities (CRHD). Her work focuses on identifying evidence-based best practices for prevention and early intervention for Latinos in mental health. Through this, she has conducted community-based forums across California to investigate the unmet mental health needs of Latinos throughout the state. She documented their voices in both rural and urban areas as well as the Latino Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Questionable (LGBTQ) community.

 

 

nicoleNicole Plata
Nicole Plata is the Youth Initiatives Coordinator for the Mental Health Association of San Francisco. She is a passionate and uncompromising advocate for Transitional Aged Youth (TAY) in the mental health system. Her passion is rooted in her own experience with trauma and is inspired by the investment of her mentors and her faith in God.

She is a native of East Side San Jose, and identifies as a Mixed-Race Latina of Panamanian and Puerto Rican descent. Having overcome a variety of challenges in her youth, from abuse and community violence to involvement in the criminal justice system and a traumatic brain surgery, Nicole offers a well-informed perspective to those she works with. She seeks to use her perspective and experience to advocate and inform services for the diverse youth of California. She does this through her work for the Mental Health Association of San Francisco and her involvement on various Transition Age Youth advocacy groups within San Francisco County and statewide. In her free time, Nicole is an artist and muralist who loves to awaken her roots through salsa dancing.

 

nikkoNikko Gabriel Reynoso
Nikko Reynoso is a Chicano trans* activist committed to social justice, gender equity, and anti-racist advocacy. From East Side San Jose, he speaks on issues relating to the intersections of identity, including sexuality, race, gender, and class. He is also a 3rd year UC Davis student studying Women and Gender studies, Chicana/o studies and Sociology.

 

 

 

claudiaClaudia Mendez
Claudia Mendez is a 22 years old student at San Francisco State University. She was born and raised in the Mission District of San Francisco, CA, and was placed in foster care at the age of 16 because of family abuse. After realizing that there were many gaps in the foster care system, Claudia decided that she wanted to be an advocate for her community and help change different systems to better the lives of other young people. She is proudly a San Francisco State University Guardian Scholar pursuing a Bachelors degree in Comparative World Literature and plans to attend law school to become a dependency lawyer. She is also a member of Honoring Emancipated Youth and trainer at Transitional Youth Initiative. Besides school, some of Claudia’s hobbies are photography, soccer with friends and family, and scrapbooking.

 

Moderator:  
mariaMaria Hinojosa, Moderator
CEO and President, The Futuro Media Group
For 25 years, Maria Hinojosa has helped tell America’s untold stories and brought to light unsung heroes in America and abroad. In April 2010, Hinojosa launched The Futuro Media Group with the mission to produce multi-platform, community-based journalism that respects and celebrates the cultural richness of the American Experience. She is the anchor and Executive Producer of her own long-running weekly NPR show, Latino USA, anchor of the Emmy Award winning talk show Maria Hinojosa: One-on-One from WGBH/La Plaza, Contributing Correspondent for Frontline and Need to Know on PBS.

Prior to launching The Futuro Media Group, Hinojosa was a Senior Correspondent for NOW on PBS, the CNN Urban Affairs correspondent for 8 years, a reporter for NPR, and producer for CBS Radio. She has written two books, including her motherhood memoir: “Raising Raul: Adventures Raising Myself and My Son.”

Hinojosa has won top honors in American journalism including four Emmy’s, the John Chancellor Award, the Studs Terkel Community Media Award, the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Reporting on the Disadvantaged, the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Overseas Press Club for best documentary for her groundbreaking Child Brides: Stolen Lives, and the Ruben Salazar Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Council of La Raza. In 2009, Hinojosa was honored with an AWRT Gracie Award for Individual Achievement as Best TV Correspondent. In 2011 she received honors from the New York Women’s Foundation, Hispanics in Philanthropy, and The Opportunity Agenda.
 
 
 
EVENT PHOTOS:  

L-R: Dr. Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola, Nicole Plata, Maria Hinojosa, Nikko Gabriel Reynoso, Lina Mendez, Claudia Mendez

L-R: Dr. Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola, Nicole Plata, Maria Hinojosa, Nikko Gabriel Reynoso, Lina Mendez, Claudia Mendez

 
 
 

The welcoming address was done by Roxana Reyes (front row, end seat), who is a UC Davis Community Counselor and part of the Community Advising Network.

The welcoming address was done by Roxana Reyes (front row, end seat), who is a UC Davis Community Counselor and part of the Community Advising Network.

 
 
 

Nikko Gabriel Reynoso shares his experience, while Maria Hinojosa, Dr. Lina Mendez, and Claudia Mendez listen.

Nikko Gabriel Reynoso shares his experience, while Maria Hinojosa, Dr. Lina Mendez, and Claudia Mendez listen.

 
 
 

Standing-room-only crowd in the UC Davis Student Community Center

Standing-room-only crowd in the UC Davis Student Community Center

 
 
 

 
 
CHECK OUT THE ONLINE CONVERSATION:  

CO-SPONSORS:  
UC Davis Center for Reducing Health Disparities
UC Davis Cross Cultural Center

PARTNERS:  
Community Advising Network (UC Davis CAPS)
Capital Public Radio
Sacramento Youth Empowerment Studios

 

MADE POSSIBLE WITH THE SUPPORT OF:    

The California Endowmenturl-1

 

 

 

 

The Enforcement Taboo

From rallies in the Capitol, to acts of protest near the Texas/Mexico border, to a federal court room in New York, immigration activists give a final push to ensure that Congress delivers the long awaited bill reforming immigration policy and enforcement. María Hinojosa speaks to Juan Cartagena, president and general counsel of Latino Justice PRLDEF based in New York City.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of the Wilson Center’s Mexican Institute.

juanJuan Cartagena is the president and general counsel for LatinoJustice PRLDEF. He is a constitutional and civil rights attorney with experience in employment rights, language rights, voting rights, public education financing, environmental law, housing and access to public hospitals.

The Congressional Potluck

So far, we’ve gotten a taste of what the Senate is preparing around immigration: but what’s cooking at the House? María Hinojosa talks to two leading voices shaping immigration legislation in the House of Representatives.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of the Wilson Center’s Mexican Institute.

Gutierrez headshotCongressman Luis V. Gutierrez is a senior Democrat on the House Financial Services Committee, serving as the of the Committee on Financial Services’ Subcommittee on Domestic and International Monetary Policy, Trade, and Technology in the 110th Congress, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit Subcommittee in the 111th Congress, and as the Ranking Member of the Housing, Insurance, and Community Opportunity Subcommittee in the 112th Congress. He played a significant role in shaping the (“Dodd-Frank”) Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in the 111th Congress, focusing particularly on consumer credit issues, remittances, and preventing future tax-payer funded bailouts of financial firms deemed “too big to fail.”

Becerra headshotCongressman Xavier Becerra was first elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1992, and serves as Chairman of the House Democratic Caucus. He is a member of the Committee on Ways And Means and is Ranking Member of the Ways and Means Subcommittee on Social Security. He was the first Latino to serve on the Ways and Means Committee, and is a member of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus (CHC) where he served as Chair during the 105th Congress (1997-98).

After the Prize

Quiara Alegría Hudes won the 2012 Pulitzer for her play “Water by the Spoonful,” about a Puerto Rican vet who returns to family strife in Philadelphia. It’s the second in a trilogy, and Maria Hinojosa speaks to the playwright just before the opening of the third play, “The Happiest Song Plays Last.”


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of The Goodman Theatre. Click here for more information on “The Happiest Song Plays Last.”

HudesQuiara_288x375Quiara Alegría Hudes is the author of “Water by the Spoonful,” winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. “Water by the Spoonful” is the second in a trilogy of plays. The first, “Elliot, A Soldier’s Fugue,” was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in 2007. She wrote the book for the Broadway musical “In the Heights,” which received the 2008 Tony Award for Best Musical, a Tony nomination for Best Book of a Musical, and was a 2009 Pulitzer Prize finalist.Hudes received a B.A. in music cum laude from Yale University and an M.F.A. in playwriting from Brown, She was recently inducted into the Central High School Hall of Fame–the first Latina and among the first group of women to receive this honor since the school’s founding in 1836. She now lives in New York with her husband and daughter.

Immigrants and Solitary Confinement

On any given day, some 300 people in U.S immigration detention centers are placed in special “segregation.” Researchers say the practice of solitary confinement can be especially detrimental to immigrant detainees’ mental health. Catherine Rentz, with the Investigative Reporting Workshop at American University, looks at how widespread the practice is, why detainees are put in solitary, and how long they stay.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Catherine Rentz, The Investigative Reporting Workshop.  

CRentz-150x150Catherine Rentz is a reporter and documentary filmmaker in residence at the Investigative Reporting Workshop at American University in Washington D.C. She’s produced several documentaries for PBS FRONTLINE about the airline industry, environmental resources, retirement finances, U.S. intelligence apparatus and immigration.

Little Dreamers

Nine-year-old Rodrigo Guzman was denied entry back into the United States after a routine visit to Mexico with his family. When his classmates at Jefferson Elementary School in Berkeley heard about Rodrigo’s dilemma, they started an online campaign to allow the family to return. Reporter Andrew Stelzer reports on the fourth-graders’ efforts to petition Congress for Rodrigo’s return, and for a fair and logical federal immigration policy.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Andrew Stelzer. 

andrew-stelzer-headshotAndrew Stelzer is an award winning radio producer and news reporter, currently working as a producer and host at the National Radio Project in Oakland, CA. Andrew’s radio work has been featured nationally and Internationally on programs including NPR’s Weekend Edition, PRI’s The World, Studio 360, Weekend America, Marketplace, Living on Earth, On the Media, Free Speech Radio News, Latino USA, Only a Game, Radio Netherlands, World Radio Switzerland, Independent Native News, Radio France International, and the Workers Independent News Service. He also files regularly for KQED radio news in San Francisco.

“News or Noise?”: Illegal Immigrant

The Associated Press announced it will stop using the term “illegal immigrant.” For our “News or Noise?” segment –where we take a look at media matters that may involve misunderstanding or misinformation— Latino USA host María Hinojosa talks to the Poynter Institute’s Kenny Irby about why this matters.


Click here to download this week’s show.  Image courtesy of Cuentame.

Check out the post on the AP blog, “Illegal immigrant no more.”

Click here to take the quiz!

Having trouble taking the quiz on your mobile device? Go to the quiz directly here.

News or Noise logo final option 2-01“News or Noise?” is a dynamic multiplatform radio project produced by Latino USA to encourage listeners to think critically about the news. Supported by Chicago’s Robert R. McCormick Foundation as part of its “Why News Matters” initiative, this year-long series of radio reports will explore top stories in the news cycle around which there is extensive commentary, misinformation, confusion or misunderstanding. The companion “News or Noise?” online quiz, (schedule here), will ask listeners to put their critical reasoning skills to the test as they discern fact from fabrication about each news topic.

Kenny Irby.photoKenny Irby is Poynter’s senior faculty and director of community relations. He’s also the director of the Write Field initiative, a dynamic new academic enrichment and mentoring program for middle school minority male youth. Irby founded Poynter’s photojournalism program in 1995.

Frida & Diego in Their Own Words

An exhibition at the High Museum in Atlanta portrays Mexican artists Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera in a new way. Along with their paintings, there are quotes from each artist about their tempestuous relationship and the tumultuous times they lived in.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Flickr.

Rich Halten2Rich Halten has had a nearly life-long love affair with radio. It started when he was 13, hanging around a station in his Florida hometown. By 16 he was spinning records after school and weekends at the station. He went on to work in radio and TV through college and even during his Army hitch, serving at the American Forces Network in Europe. After a successful career in advertising, Rich returned to his radio roots. Following a stint as a producer at an Atlanta Sports/Talk station, he segued to public radio. In the past five years he’s produced short and long-form pieces that aired on NPR stations around the country, as well as Radio National Australia, and were featured on-line. He continues to be guided by the belief that the pictures ARE better on the radio.

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