Latino USA

Archive for May, 2013

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: THE SUMMER JUKEBOX EDITION

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we help you get your summer playlist ready with an show dedicated to music. We sit down with Bajofondo’s Gustavo Santaolalla to talk about the group’s most recent album, “Presente.” We sit down with Venezuelan guitarist and singer Jose Luis Pardo from Los Amigos Invisibles; and, as part of our accordion series, we speak to Very Be Careful, a Los Angeles based band that’s helping revive Colombian vallenato in the U.S. Finally, an interview with Mexican rapper Carla Reyna, aka Niña Dioz.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Bajofondo? “Presente!”

If you’ve seen Babel, Motorcycle Diaries, or Brokeback Mountain you’ve heard the music of producer and film score composer Gustavo Santaolalla.  This time around, his most recent work comes with Argentine-Uruguayan electro-tango group Bajofondo. María Hinojosa speaks to Santaolalla about their newest record, “Presente.”
Photo courtesy of BajofondoMusic.Com.

 

Click below for an extended version of Maria’s interview with Gustavo Santaollala:

 

GustavoGustavo Santaolalla is a composer, producer, guitarist, and he directs a record label and a publishing company. His production career started with Argentine singer Leon Gieco in 1973. He continued to work on albums by G.I.T. and Divididos (La Era de la Boludez), and later with Mexican bands like Maldita Vecindad and Café Tacuba. His work as a film score composer began with his contribution to the soundtrack for “The Insider.” He later worked on “Amores Perros”, “21 Grams”, “Motorcycle Diaries”, “Brokeback Mountain”, and “Babel”.

The “Six” Amigos

Venezuelan band Los Amigos Invisibles bring their fusion jazz and Latino funk to liven up the party. María Hinojosa speaks with guitarist, singer, and D.J Jose Luis Pardo, aka Cheo, about their newest album, “Repeat After Me.”
Album cover courtesy of Los Amigos Invisibles.

Screen Shot 2013-05-31 at 12.45.18 PMJose Luis Pardo, aka Cheo, or “DJ Afro” is the guitarist and singer of Los Amigos Invisibles; he is also a producer and editor.

Vallenato Fever

As part of our accordion series, we hear vallenato, a Colombian style mix of African, European and indigenous sounds. Julie Caine reports on Los Angeles based Very Be careful, one of the U.S bands that’s bringing vallenato back to life.

Photo courtesy of Very Be Careful Facebook.


sound-226x300Julie Caine is a photographer by background, a filmmaker by training, and a radio producer by passion.

Spitting in Spanglish

From the Mecca of Mexican hip-hop, 27-year-old rapper Carla Reyna, aka Niña Dioz, talks about hip-hop, race, and her new album, “Indestructible.”
Photo Courtesy of Niña Dioz Facebook.

Screen Shot 2013-05-31 at 1.34.13 PMCarla Reyna, better known by her MC name Niña Dioz, emerged from the underground hip-hop scene in Monterrey, Mexico. After years of making a name for herself in Mexico and internationally on the hip-hop festival circuit, she has finally released her first full-length album, “Indestructible,” a collection of Spanglish rhymes and high-energy beats.

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: STRAIGHT OUT OF COMMITTEE

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we bring you an update on the Senate immigration plan as it heads to the Senate floor. And we report from two of the dozens of schools shuttered in Chicago. We sit down with Dominican-American author Raquel Cepeda to talk about her memoir “Bird of Paradise: How I Became a Latina.” Finally, the premiere of “Rebel,” a story about the Cuban women who disguised herself as a man to fight in the Civil War.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

REFORM MOVES TO SENATE

The Gang of Eight’s immigration plan cleared the Senate Judiciary Committee this month. The bill is expected to hit the floor in June for a vote. María Hinojosa speaks to Ted Hesson, immigration editor at Fusion, and Julia Preston, New York Times national immigration correspondent.

Among the amendments approved this month is one that limits the use of solitary confinement inside detention centers, an issue we’ve followed closely and reported on.
Click HERE for a list of amendments.

 

Image courtesy of Commons/wikimedia.org.

TanyaJulia Preston was a member of The New York Times staff that won the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for reporting on internationalaffairs for its series that profiled the corrosive effects of drug corruption in Mexico. Ms. Preston came to The Times in July 1995 after working at the Washington Post for nine years as a foreign correspondent. She is a 1997 recipient of the Maria Moors Cabot Prize for distinguished coverage of Latin America and a 1994 winner of the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Humanitarian Journalism.

Lisa CarterTed Hesson is the immigration editor for Fusion, a joint venture of ABC News and Univision. Before joining the team in 2012, he served as online editor for Long Island Wins, a non-profit organization focusing on local and national immigration issues. Ted has written for a variety of magazines, newspapers, and online publications, including The Journal News, Time Out New York, and the Philadelphia City Paper. He earned his master’s degree at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and his bachelor’s degree at Boston College. He resides in Washington, D.C.

 

 

 

 

 

CHICAGO SHUTDOWNS: WHAT’S LOST

Despite strong protests, the city of Chicago announced it would close 50 neighborhood public schools at the end of this school year. Students from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University reported on several of the schools listed for closure. One was home to an innovative program for children with special needs, the other ran health care and food programs for the neighborhood at large. Bryan Lowry, Jennifer Kirby report. Carrie Eidson contributed to this report.

Image courtesy of Flickr/chicagopublicradio.

Lowry Edit

Bryan Lowry is a graduate student in journalism at Northwestern University’s Medill School, specializing in public affairs reporting. He previously served as an English teacher in the San Francisco Unified School District for three years. The experience of working with children from San Francisco’s often overlooked low-income communities inspired him to embark on a career as journalist to tell the type of stories that sometimes fall through the cracks. He is a native of Pennsylvania and a graduate of Boston University.

KirbyPhotoJen Kirby is a graduate student at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, where she focuses on magazine writing and urban reporting. She previously worked in the non-profit sector and received her bachelor’s degree in international politics from Georgetown University in Washington, DC.

 

eidsonCarrie Eidson is a graduate student at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, where she focuses on urban affairs reporting. She is a native of Asheville, North Carolina.

 

THE SCIENCE OF “LATINA”

Dominican-American author Raquel Cepeda went on a search to find out about her heritage and identity. How? Through ancestral DNA testing. María Hinojosa speaks with Cepeda about her memoir, “Bird of Paradise: How I Became Latina.”

Raquel.photoRaquel Cepeda is an award-winning journalist, cultural activist and documentary filmmaker. A former magazine editor, her byline has appeared in The Village Voice, CNN.com, and the Associated Press. She directed and produced “Bling: A Planet Rock,” about American hip-hop culture’s obsession with diamonds.

SECRET REBEL

Cuban immigrant Loreta Velazquez once disguised herself as a man just so she could fight in the Civil War. We speak to writer and director María Agui Carter about her film, “Rebel,” premiering nationwide on PBS.

Image courtesy of Flickr/TradingCardsNPS.

MariaMaría Agui Carter emigrated to the U.S. from Ecuador, grew up an undocumented “Dreamer” in New York City, and graduated from Harvard College. A filmmaker and scholar, she has won the George Peabody Gardner, Warren and Rockefeller Grants and has been a visiting scholar at Harvard and Tulane. Her work has been shown at film festivals and has been broadcast internationally. Based in Boston, she is an advocate for Latino and social issue filmmakers. She currently serves as the Chair of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers.

 

 

Watch Rebel – Preview on PBS. See more from VOCES.

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