Show Buttons
Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkdin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Hide Buttons

Archive for June, 2013

Decisions, Decisions at the Supreme Court

The Supreme Court ruled its last batch of decisions on several cases that directly impact Latinos and other people of color. Among these, a decision that invalidates one of the most important provisions of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Myrna Perez, Deputy Director at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law, talks about some of these cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr/SEIU



pabloMyrna Perez is a senior counsel for the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, a legal research and advocacy organization at New York University. She also works on a variety of voting rights related issues, including redistricting, voter registration list maintenance, and access to the ballot box. Before joining the center, Ms. Pérez was the Civil Rights Fellow at Relman & Dane, a civil rights law firm in Washington, D.C.

News or Noise? The Intern Edition

Interns are challenging their unpaid status in court. In recent one federal case, courts ruled in their favor, saying they should have been paid for their work. Maria Hinojosa discusses the case and its coverage with journalist and media critic Farai Chidey and Latino USA summer intern Hanna Guerrero.

Image courtesy of

Click here to take the quiz!

Having trouble taking the quiz on your mobile device? Go to the quiz directly here.

head_shot_lasloFarai Chideya has combined media, technology, and socio-political analysis during her 20-year career as an award-winning author and journalist. She is a Distinguished Writer in Residence at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute


head_shot_lasloHanna Guerrero is a journalism student at DePaul University. She is a summer intern at Latino USA.

Dual Language Central

It’s been 50 years since the nation’s first bilingual education program started in Miami. Reporter Trina Sargalski  visits the Coral Way elementary school to find out the secret of its success.

Image courtesy of

head_shot_lasloTrina Sargalski is a freelance producer and reporter. She covers food and South Florida life for WLRN Miami Herald News. She also writes about food as the Miami editor of Tasting Table and as the editor of her own blog, Miami Dish.

Radio Vieques

For more than five decades, the U.S Navy used the Puerto Rican island of Vieques as a practice bombing range. Ten years after the Navy pulled out of the island, Viequenses struggle with health problems they say are caused by environmental toxins left by the bombings. That’s why artists from Puerto Rico are coming together to raise funds for Radio Vieques, a new community radio station that will inform Viequenses and help them navigate their future.

Image courtesy of Flickr


Congressional House Divided

Just after the last presidential election, prominent Republicans sent a clear message to support an immigration overhaul. But after months of debate, divisions among Republicans in Congress over a path to citizenship in the bill threaten the new pro-Latino rhetoric the party has worked so hard to promote. Matt Laslo reports from Washington.

Image courtesy of Flickr/Joe Goldberg.

head_shot_lasloMatt Laslo is a freelance reporter who has been covering Congress, the White House and the Supreme Court for more than five years. He has filed stories for more than 40 local NPR stations. His work has also appeared in The Atlantic, The Chattanooga Times Free Press, National Public Radio, The Omaha World-Herald, Pacifica Radio, Politics Magazine, and Washington Magazine.

Tackling the GOP’s Latino Problem

The Republican Party continues to struggle to recover the level of Latino support it enjoyed during the George W. Bush era. The $64 million question: can the Republicans do it, and how? María Hinojosa speaks with Pablo Pantoja, former Republican National Committee Hispanic outreach director in Florida, and George Antuna, co-founder of the Hispanic Republicans of Texas.

Photo courtesy of…


pabloPablo Pantoja has worked and volunteered in several roles with the Republican Party at the local, state, and national levels. Recently, he repudiated the culture of intolerance in the Republican Party through a public letter to his friends and took a stand by switching to the Democratic Party. Pantoja is a veteran of the Army National Guard and holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Spanish and a Master’s Degree in Political Science, Applied American Politics and Policy from Florida State University.

Screen Shot 2013-06-21 at 1.21.40 PMGeorge Antuna Jr. is the co-founder of the Hispanic Republicans of Texas. He is a former candidate for the Texas House of Representatives and worked for U.S. Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison as Regional Director for San Antonio, South Central Texas and El Paso. Before entering public service, he was the Director of Protocol for then Texas Secretary of State, Henry Cuellar, and Policy Analyst of Workforce Development, Economic Development and International Relations for then Lt. Governor Rick Perry. Mr. Antuna was elected to the council of the City of Schertz in May, 2011. He currently works in the financial services industry.


Charrito de Oro

Ten-year-old Sebastian de la Cruz got a dream gig singing the U.S national anthem “Mariachi style” during this year’s NBA finals. But after his performance, a wave of bigoted remarks soon followed. Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa cheers on the little “Charro” for turning negativity into a chance to showcase his pride.

Check out el Charrito sing at Game 4 of the NBA finals.

Bienvenidos a Woodburn

The increase in Latino populations throughout many U.S. communities in the past two decades may be old news. But in states like Oregon, the change is very recent and very dramatic. Producer Dmae Roberts brings us a portrait of a town transformed in the Beaver state. Woodburn is now 60% Latino, the highest proportion in the state.

Image of the Quinteros at their Woodburn “taquería,” courtesy of Dmae Roberts.

DmaeDmae Roberts is a two-time Peabody award-winning radio artist and writer based in Portland, Oregon who has written and produced more than 500 audio art pieces and documentaries for NPR and PRI. She is a USA Rockefeller Fellow and received the Dr. Suzanne Award for Civil Rights and Social Justice from the Asian American Journalists Association for her Peabody-winning eight-hour Crossing East Asian American history series that ran on 230 stations. Her essay “Finding The Poetry” was published in John Biewen’s essay book Reality Radio (UNC Press).


Latino USA takes a minute to remember Arturo Vega, the Mexican immigrant and “Fifth Ramone,” who designed the iconic logo for the classic New York punk band. He died earlier this month at 65 years of age.

Photo courtesy of



Repainting Farm Labor… With Blue

For the nearly one-and-a-half million migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the U.S, the solution to legalization no longer lies on a green card, but a “blue card.” A new provision in the Senate immigration reform bill could expedite the path to legalization for immigrant farmworkers seeking permanent residency. Sean Powers reports from Illinois.

Photo courtesy of Sean Powers.

SeanPowersRadioStudioSean Powers is a reporter and digital editor at Illinois Public Media. Powers is a native of the south suburbs of Chicago, and he graduated with a journalism degree from the University of Missouri. In 2012, he completed a fellowship at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. He’s currently working on a master’s degree in the library science program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

“News or Noise?” The Media’s Choice

For this week’s “News or Noise?” we look at media coverage on labor provisions in the Senate immigration reform bill. Why so much media buzz around visas for high tech workers in comparison to the coverage on the farmworker deal? María Hinojosa speaks with Ted Hesson, immigration editor at Fusion.

Photo courtesy of


Click here to take the quiz!

Having trouble taking the quiz on your mobile device? Go to the quiz directly here.


Hesson-headshotTed Hesson is the immigration editor for Fusion, a joint venture of ABC News and Univision. Before joining the team in 2012, he served as online editor for Long Island Wins, a non-profit organization focusing on local and national immigration issues. Ted has written for a variety of magazines, newspapers, and online publications, including The Journal News, Time Out New York, and the Philadelphia City Paper. He earned his master’s degree at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and his bachelor’s degree at Boston College. He resides in Washington, D.C.

“Voluntary Departure?”

The ACLU filed a lawsuit last week against the U.S. government alleging that immigration officers are pressuring undocumented immigrants into signing their own deportation orders and waiving their rights to appear before an immigration judge. John Carlos Frey reports.

Photo: Family victim of coerced deportation. Courtesy of Rebecca Rauber.

john-carlos-frey-cropped_150-122x150John Carlos Frey is a freelance investigative reporter and documentary filmmaker based in Los Angeles. His investigative work has been featured on the 60 Minutes episode, “The All American Canal;” a three-part series for PBS entitled “Crossing the Line;” and several episodes of Dan Rather Reports, “Angel of the Desert,” and “Operation Streamline.” In 2011 Frey documented the journey of Mexican migrants across the US-Mexico border and walked for days in the Arizona desert risking his own life for the documentary Life and Death on the Border”. John Carlos Frey has also written articles for the Los Angeles Times, the Huffington Post, Salon, Need to Know online, the Washington Monthly, and El Diario (in Spanish). Frey’s documentary films include The Invisible Mexicans of Deer Canyon (2007), The Invisible Chapel (2008), and The 800 Mile Wall (2009). He is the 2012 recipient of the Scripps Howard Award and the Sigma Delta Chi award for his Investigative Fund/PBS reporting on the excessive use of force by the US Border Patrol.

Judy Reyes, the Devious Maid

The new Lifetime show Devious Maids, executive produced by Eva Longoria, is the first prime time program in TV history to feature an all-Latina leading cast. But even before its June 23 premiere, the show has already generated criticism around the portrayal of Latinas as maids. Actress Judy Reyes, who stars as devious maid Zoila Diaz, talks about her new role, the criticism surrounding the program, and what it means to play complex Latina characters.

Image courtesy of Jim Fiscus.

Click below for the extended interview with Judy Reyes:



Judy Reyes is a first generation Dominican-American actress born in the Bronx, NY. She came into popular view playing nurse Carla Espinosa on the NBC sitcom Scrubs. Judy has now taken on the role of Zoila Diaz on the Lifetime Television show, Devious Maids.

Image courtesy of Richard McLaren.

Rhyming for Democracy

Destiny Galindo is a 17-year-old rapper who may not be able to vote, but believes in the power of the people all the same. The Arizona teenager was just awarded a $25,000 prize in the Looking@Democracy challenge sponsored by The MacArthur Foundation.

Image courtesy of Destiny Galindo, “American Vision”.


Destiny Galindo is a 17-year-old Mexican-American rapper hailing from Phoenix, Arizona. She graduated high school this year, and was just awarded a $25,000 prize in the Looking@Democracy challenge sponsored by The MacArthur Foundation for her music video “American Vision”.

Into the Wild… New World

For many students, summertime means graduation time. Getting into college is already a task on its own. But what about getting a job? We hear from three Latino graduates from Missouri and North Carolina about what it meant to finish college and about their transition from the school gates to the brave new world.

Photo courtesy of Flickr/My Standard Break From Life.


SergioWhen Sergio entered the University of North Carolina in 2006, there were only one or two other students there besides him who were undocumented, and he was careful to keep quiet about his status. Many of his friends and relatives had told him not to bother trying to go to college and to just get a job at Burger King or MacDonald’s, but Sergio didn’t listen to them. With the help of a full scholarship, he graduated in 2011 with a degree in English. He’s been working in the restaurant business since then. But when his Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals permit comes through, he hopes to work in education or a related profession.

GinaGeorgina Leal graduated from DePaul University with a B.A. in Anthropology and Latin American/Latino studies. She is currently completing a year of service with the Vincentian Mission Corps in St. Louis, and hopes to pursue a PhD in socio-cultural Anthropology.



jaysonJayson came to the U.S. from Guatemala with his family eight years ago. With scholarship money, he became the first in his family to go to college, graduating from the University of Richmond in 2012 with a degree in business administration. Because he’s undocumented, Jayson couldn’t get a job in his field and spent the last year painting houses. But once he gained a legal presence in the US through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, Jayson got several job offers and accepted one in hospital administration. He and his partner are expecting their first child this summer.


THIS WEEK'S SHOW: In this week's show,…

This Week's Captions: Money...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: From Puerto Rico to…


Audio visual notes for the hearing impaired.

Join the conversation

© 2015 Futuro Media Group

Contact /

Your privacy is important to us. We do not share your information.

[bwp-recaptcha bwp-recaptcha-913]

Tel /

+1 646-571-1220

Fax /

+1 646-571-1221

Mailing Address /

361 West 125st Street
Fourth Floor
New York, NY 10027