Decisions, Decisions at the Supreme Court

The Supreme Court ruled its last batch of decisions on several cases that directly impact Latinos and other people of color. Among these, a decision that invalidates one of the most important provisions of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Myrna Perez, Deputy Director at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law, talks about some of these cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr/SEIU

 

 

pabloMyrna Perez is a senior counsel for the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, a legal research and advocacy organization at New York University. She also works on a variety of voting rights related issues, including redistricting, voter registration list maintenance, and access to the ballot box. Before joining the center, Ms. Pérez was the Civil Rights Fellow at Relman & Dane, a civil rights law firm in Washington, D.C.

News or Noise? The Intern Edition

Interns are challenging their unpaid status in court. In recent one federal case, courts ruled in their favor, saying they should have been paid for their work. Maria Hinojosa discusses the case and its coverage with journalist and media critic Farai Chidey and Latino USA summer intern Hanna Guerrero.

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head_shot_lasloFarai Chideya has combined media, technology, and socio-political analysis during her 20-year career as an award-winning author and journalist. She is a Distinguished Writer in Residence at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute

 

head_shot_lasloHanna Guerrero is a journalism student at DePaul University. She is a summer intern at Latino USA.

Dual Language Central

It’s been 50 years since the nation’s first bilingual education program started in Miami. Reporter Trina Sargalski  visits the Coral Way elementary school to find out the secret of its success.

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head_shot_lasloTrina Sargalski is a freelance producer and reporter. She covers food and South Florida life for WLRN Miami Herald News. She also writes about food as the Miami editor of Tasting Table and as the editor of her own blog, Miami Dish.

Radio Vieques

For more than five decades, the U.S Navy used the Puerto Rican island of Vieques as a practice bombing range. Ten years after the Navy pulled out of the island, Viequenses struggle with health problems they say are caused by environmental toxins left by the bombings. That’s why artists from Puerto Rico are coming together to raise funds for Radio Vieques, a new community radio station that will inform Viequenses and help them navigate their future.

Image courtesy of Flickr

 

Congressional House Divided

Just after the last presidential election, prominent Republicans sent a clear message to support an immigration overhaul. But after months of debate, divisions among Republicans in Congress over a path to citizenship in the bill threaten the new pro-Latino rhetoric the party has worked so hard to promote. Matt Laslo reports from Washington.

Image courtesy of Flickr/Joe Goldberg.


head_shot_lasloMatt Laslo is a freelance reporter who has been covering Congress, the White House and the Supreme Court for more than five years. He has filed stories for more than 40 local NPR stations. His work has also appeared in The Atlantic, The Chattanooga Times Free Press, National Public Radio, The Omaha World-Herald, Pacifica Radio, Politics Magazine, and Washington Magazine.

Tackling the GOP’s Latino Problem

The Republican Party continues to struggle to recover the level of Latino support it enjoyed during the George W. Bush era. The $64 million question: can the Republicans do it, and how? María Hinojosa speaks with Pablo Pantoja, former Republican National Committee Hispanic outreach director in Florida, and George Antuna, co-founder of the Hispanic Republicans of Texas.

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pabloPablo Pantoja has worked and volunteered in several roles with the Republican Party at the local, state, and national levels. Recently, he repudiated the culture of intolerance in the Republican Party through a public letter to his friends and took a stand by switching to the Democratic Party. Pantoja is a veteran of the Army National Guard and holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Spanish and a Master’s Degree in Political Science, Applied American Politics and Policy from Florida State University.

Screen Shot 2013-06-21 at 1.21.40 PMGeorge Antuna Jr. is the co-founder of the Hispanic Republicans of Texas. He is a former candidate for the Texas House of Representatives and worked for U.S. Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison as Regional Director for San Antonio, South Central Texas and El Paso. Before entering public service, he was the Director of Protocol for then Texas Secretary of State, Henry Cuellar, and Policy Analyst of Workforce Development, Economic Development and International Relations for then Lt. Governor Rick Perry. Mr. Antuna was elected to the council of the City of Schertz in May, 2011. He currently works in the financial services industry.

 

Charrito de Oro

Ten-year-old Sebastian de la Cruz got a dream gig singing the U.S national anthem “Mariachi style” during this year’s NBA finals. But after his performance, a wave of bigoted remarks soon followed. Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa cheers on the little “Charro” for turning negativity into a chance to showcase his pride.

Check out el Charrito sing at Game 4 of the NBA finals.

Bienvenidos a Woodburn

The increase in Latino populations throughout many U.S. communities in the past two decades may be old news. But in states like Oregon, the change is very recent and very dramatic. Producer Dmae Roberts brings us a portrait of a town transformed in the Beaver state. Woodburn is now 60% Latino, the highest proportion in the state.

Image of the Quinteros at their Woodburn “taquería,” courtesy of Dmae Roberts.


DmaeDmae Roberts is a two-time Peabody award-winning radio artist and writer based in Portland, Oregon who has written and produced more than 500 audio art pieces and documentaries for NPR and PRI. She is a USA Rockefeller Fellow and received the Dr. Suzanne Award for Civil Rights and Social Justice from the Asian American Journalists Association for her Peabody-winning eight-hour Crossing East Asian American history series that ran on 230 stations. Her essay “Finding The Poetry” was published in John Biewen’s essay book Reality Radio (UNC Press).

Repainting Farm Labor… With Blue

For the nearly one-and-a-half million migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the U.S, the solution to legalization no longer lies on a green card, but a “blue card.” A new provision in the Senate immigration reform bill could expedite the path to legalization for immigrant farmworkers seeking permanent residency. Sean Powers reports from Illinois.

Photo courtesy of Sean Powers.


SeanPowersRadioStudioSean Powers is a reporter and digital editor at Illinois Public Media. Powers is a native of the south suburbs of Chicago, and he graduated with a journalism degree from the University of Missouri. In 2012, he completed a fellowship at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. He’s currently working on a master’s degree in the library science program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.