Latino USA

Archive for June, 2013

ADIOS TO “DON RAMONE”

Latino USA takes a minute to remember Arturo Vega, the Mexican immigrant and “Fifth Ramone,” who designed the iconic logo for the classic New York punk band. He died earlier this month at 65 years of age.

Photo courtesy of flickr.com/photos/toniblay

 

 

This Week’s Captions: REPAINTING FARM LABOR… WITH BLUE

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we look at a Senate immigration proposal that could pave a quicker road to legalization, for farmworkers. And for “News or Noise?”… Why so much more media buzz on immigration deals for tech workers over farmworkers? Then, an ACLU lawsuit against the U.S. government for coercing immigrants to sign their own deportations. And we speak with Judy Reyes about the new Lifetime show Devious Maids. Finally, we talk to Destiny Galindo, a 17-year-old Arizonian who raps about democracy.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Repainting Farm Labor… With Blue

For the nearly one-and-a-half million migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the U.S, the solution to legalization no longer lies on a green card, but a “blue card.” A new provision in the Senate immigration reform bill could expedite the path to legalization for immigrant farmworkers seeking permanent residency. Sean Powers reports from Illinois.

Photo courtesy of Sean Powers.


SeanPowersRadioStudioSean Powers is a reporter and digital editor at Illinois Public Media. Powers is a native of the south suburbs of Chicago, and he graduated with a journalism degree from the University of Missouri. In 2012, he completed a fellowship at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. He’s currently working on a master’s degree in the library science program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

“News or Noise?” The Media’s Choice

For this week’s “News or Noise?” we look at media coverage on labor provisions in the Senate immigration reform bill. Why so much media buzz around visas for high tech workers in comparison to the coverage on the farmworker deal? María Hinojosa speaks with Ted Hesson, immigration editor at Fusion.

Photo courtesy of FWD.us.

 

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Hesson-headshotTed Hesson is the immigration editor for Fusion, a joint venture of ABC News and Univision. Before joining the team in 2012, he served as online editor for Long Island Wins, a non-profit organization focusing on local and national immigration issues. Ted has written for a variety of magazines, newspapers, and online publications, including The Journal News, Time Out New York, and the Philadelphia City Paper. He earned his master’s degree at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and his bachelor’s degree at Boston College. He resides in Washington, D.C.

“Voluntary Departure?”

The ACLU filed a lawsuit last week against the U.S. government alleging that immigration officers are pressuring undocumented immigrants into signing their own deportation orders and waiving their rights to appear before an immigration judge. John Carlos Frey reports.

Photo: Family victim of coerced deportation. Courtesy of Rebecca Rauber.


john-carlos-frey-cropped_150-122x150John Carlos Frey is a freelance investigative reporter and documentary filmmaker based in Los Angeles. His investigative work has been featured on the 60 Minutes episode, “The All American Canal;” a three-part series for PBS entitled “Crossing the Line;” and several episodes of Dan Rather Reports, “Angel of the Desert,” and “Operation Streamline.” In 2011 Frey documented the journey of Mexican migrants across the US-Mexico border and walked for days in the Arizona desert risking his own life for the documentary Life and Death on the Border”. John Carlos Frey has also written articles for the Los Angeles Times, the Huffington Post, Salon, Need to Know online, the Washington Monthly, and El Diario (in Spanish). Frey’s documentary films include The Invisible Mexicans of Deer Canyon (2007), The Invisible Chapel (2008), and The 800 Mile Wall (2009). He is the 2012 recipient of the Scripps Howard Award and the Sigma Delta Chi award for his Investigative Fund/PBS reporting on the excessive use of force by the US Border Patrol.

Judy Reyes, the Devious Maid

The new Lifetime show Devious Maids, executive produced by Eva Longoria, is the first prime time program in TV history to feature an all-Latina leading cast. But even before its June 23 premiere, the show has already generated criticism around the portrayal of Latinas as maids. Actress Judy Reyes, who stars as devious maid Zoila Diaz, talks about her new role, the criticism surrounding the program, and what it means to play complex Latina characters.

Image courtesy of Jim Fiscus.

Click below for the extended interview with Judy Reyes:

 

Tanya

Judy Reyes is a first generation Dominican-American actress born in the Bronx, NY. She came into popular view playing nurse Carla Espinosa on the NBC sitcom Scrubs. Judy has now taken on the role of Zoila Diaz on the Lifetime Television show, Devious Maids.

Image courtesy of Richard McLaren.

Rhyming for Democracy

Destiny Galindo is a 17-year-old rapper who may not be able to vote, but believes in the power of the people all the same. The Arizona teenager was just awarded a $25,000 prize in the Looking@Democracy challenge sponsored by The MacArthur Foundation.

Image courtesy of Destiny Galindo, “American Vision”.

Tanya

Destiny Galindo is a 17-year-old Mexican-American rapper hailing from Phoenix, Arizona. She graduated high school this year, and was just awarded a $25,000 prize in the Looking@Democracy challenge sponsored by The MacArthur Foundation for her music video “American Vision”.

This Week’s Captions: INTO THE WILD… NEW WORLD

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we hear from Latino college graduates on what it’s like to step into the brave new world, with a little word of advice. And, a recent study shows Latinos entering U.S. colleges at a higher rate than any other ethnic group: but, what about college completion? Then, we bring you an update on Fisher v University of Texas at Austin, a case on affirmative action and college admission, soon to be decided by the U.S. Supreme Court. A look back at the “Bracero Program,” with a taste of injustice. Finally, a tour of a garden between the U.S. and Mexico where the flora and fauna defy the border fence.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Into the Wild… New World

For many students, summertime means graduation time. Getting into college is already a task on its own. But what about getting a job? We hear from three Latino graduates from Missouri and North Carolina about what it meant to finish college and about their transition from the school gates to the brave new world.

Photo courtesy of Flickr/My Standard Break From Life.

 

SergioWhen Sergio entered the University of North Carolina in 2006, there were only one or two other students there besides him who were undocumented, and he was careful to keep quiet about his status. Many of his friends and relatives had told him not to bother trying to go to college and to just get a job at Burger King or MacDonald’s, but Sergio didn’t listen to them. With the help of a full scholarship, he graduated in 2011 with a degree in English. He’s been working in the restaurant business since then. But when his Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals permit comes through, he hopes to work in education or a related profession.

GinaGeorgina Leal graduated from DePaul University with a B.A. in Anthropology and Latin American/Latino studies. She is currently completing a year of service with the Vincentian Mission Corps in St. Louis, and hopes to pursue a PhD in socio-cultural Anthropology.

 

 

jaysonJayson came to the U.S. from Guatemala with his family eight years ago. With scholarship money, he became the first in his family to go to college, graduating from the University of Richmond in 2012 with a degree in business administration. Because he’s undocumented, Jayson couldn’t get a job in his field and spent the last year painting houses. But once he gained a legal presence in the US through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, Jayson got several job offers and accepted one in hospital administration. He and his partner are expecting their first child this summer.

Latinos in College, the New and the Old

We often hear about Latinos being underrepresented in college campuses when compared to other ethnicities. A recent report, however, shows that for the first time, there are more Latino high school graduates entering college than whites. But what about finishing college? For an overview on new and old trends, María Hinojosa speaks with Richard Fry, senior research associate at the Pew Research Hispanic Center.

Photo courtesy of Flickr/always.amym.

 

Fry.photoRichard Fry is a senior economist at the Pew Research Hispanic Center. He is an expert on school and college enrollment in the United States, as well as the returns to education in the labor market, marriage market, and its connection to household economic well-being such as net worth. Before joining the Pew Research Center in 2002, he was a senior economist at the Educational Testing Service (ETS).

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