Latino USA

Archive for July, 2013

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: In the Air, On the Air

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we go to California to find out how agricultural workers are protecting themselves from deadly heat. Then, we learn about how residents of Albuquerque are measuring pollution in the air. We explore what we mean when we discuss bias in the news media. And we hear from immigrants to the US who don’t want to become citizens.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Heat stress in the fields

It’s been a hot summer throughout the country, and for people working outside, the high temperatures can be deadly. Lisa Morehouse reports from California, where the deaths of three agricultural workers are being investigated.

Image courtesy of Lisa Morehouse


Lisa-Morehouse-150x150Lisa Morehouse is an award-winning independent public radio and print journalist, who’s filed for KQED’s The California Report, NPR’s Latino USA and All Things Considered, Edutopia magazine and McSweeney’s. Her reporting has taken her from Samoan traveling circuses to Mississippi Delta classrooms to the homes of Lao refugees in rural Iowa.  She’s currently working on After The Gold Rush: The Future of Rural California, an audio documentary website and series. A former public school teacher, Morehouse also works with at-risk youth to produce radio diaries.

Air Quality in Albuquerque

Residents of a poor industrial neighborhood in Albuquerque are learning to monitor the quality of their air. KUNM’s Sara Van Note reports.

Image courtesy of Sara Van Note



VanNote Sara Van Note is a freelance journalist and educator based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. She files locally with KUNM, and has reported on immigration and education issues. She’s inspired by the Southwest’s incredible landscapes and people, and keeps an ear out for rich accents, unexpected birdsong, and watery oases. Sara recently returned from a year in Nicaragua, where she taught kids yoga and English and shared her photos and wonderings on her personal blog and in online news outlets. Her work with a women’s community radio project in northern Nicaragua helped her develop a new understanding of the power of radio.

 

This story is part of the RadioNature series which explores the ways Latinos connect with nature. RadioNature is supported by the REI Foundation.

 

 

 

 

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News or Noise: Bias

In the latest installment of our news literacy series News or Noise, senior producer Carolina Gonzalez talks with journalism students Hanna Guerrero and Laura Rodriguez about what we mean when we discuss bias in the news media.

Image courtesy of MSNBC

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Special thanks to our collaborators on our “News or Noise?” segment:
Radio Camp at Union Docs
The Pasos al Futuro Workshop at DePaul University 


head_shot_lasloHanna Guerrero is a journalism student at DePaul University. She is a summer intern at Latino USA.

 

 

 

Laura Rodriguez was born and raised in Guanajuato, Mexico and came to the United States at the age of 9. She is currently a 4th year student at DePaul University pursuing a degree in broadcast journalism, a minor in Latino Media and in the Spanish Language.

Reluctant Citizens

Not everyone who immigrates to the United States wants to become a citizen. There are around ten million legal permanent residents who aren’t applying. We’ll hear why. Reported by Jacob Lewin.

Image courtesy of Flickr

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: The Latin Alternative Music Conference

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Latino USA returns to the Latin Alternative Music conference, a showcase of the latest and greatest tunes from across Latin America. Guest host Nadia Reiman digs through the best new music and talks to artists both old and new about what advice they could use, what advice they can give, and why Chile is going through a pop renaissance.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

¡A bailar! at the LAMC

Latino USA returns to the Latin Alternative Music conference, a showcase of the latest and greatest tunes from across Latin America. Guest host Nadia Reiman digs through the best new music and talks to both new artists and veterans about what advice they could use, what advice they can give, and why Chile is going through a pop renaissance.

Image courtesy of Karlo Ramos.

Click photo below to scroll through the gallery of Nadia and producer Michael Johnson’s photos from LAMC:

[nggallery id=3]

Fixing a system, piece by piece?

Both political parties agree: the immigration system is broken. But is that enough to get immigration reform bills through the House of Representatives? We hear from Congressmen Xavier Becerra and Raul Labrador.

Image courtesy of Flickr 

First elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1992, Xavier Becerra represents California’s 34th District and serves as Chairman of the House Democratic Caucus. He is a longstanding member of the powerful Ways and Means Committee and is the ranking member of the Subcommittee on Social Security.

 

 

Rep. Raúl Labrador’s political career began in 2006 when he was elected to the Idaho State Legislature representing western Ada County. In 2010, Raúl was elected to represent the people of the first congressional district of Idaho.

This Week’s Captions: The Border

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Latino USA spends this week on the U.S.-Mexico border. We’ll hear deported parents trying to bring their child back from the United States, a Mexican village along a re-opening border, and hear reviews of border crossings from Yelp.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Purgatorio

How should one view the US/Mexico border? Guest host Carolina Gonzalez talks to film director Rodrigo Reyes about his vision in his new documentary, Purgatorio.

 

Born in Mexico City in 1983, Rodrigo Reyes attended college in UC San Diego, as well as Madrid and Mexico City, earning degree in International Studies. Instead of following this career path, Reyes channeled his multi-cultural background in to becoming a filmmaker. Reyes has directed several documentaries exploring Mexico, including the experimental narrative Memories of the Future. In 2012, he was selected to the prestigious IFP Filmmaker Labs with his latest documentary Purgatorio. In 2013 this film premiered at the Guadalajara IFF as well as Los Angeles Film Festival to great reviews.

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