Latino USA

Archive for September 13th, 2013

Deportee Plane

Reporter Valerie Hamilton tells the story of deportees who died in a 1948 plane crash. Their identities remained unknown until now. Also, Maria Hinojosa interviews Hamilton about the Woody Guthrie song “Deportee,” inspired by the crash. Additional reporting by Rebecca Plevin.

Photo: Tim Hernandez, right, and folk musician John McCutcheon, left, unveiling the new memorial dedicated to the victims of the deportee plane crash. Also unveiling the memorial were musician Lance Canales and Jaime Ramirez, the relative of two crash victims. Image courtesy of Rebecca Plevin/Valley Public Radio.

 

The plane crash victims:

Miguel Negrete Álvarez
Tomás Aviña de Gracia
Francisco Llamas Durán
Santiago García Elizondo
Rosalio Padilla Estrada
Tomás Padilla Márquez
Bernabé López Garcia
Salvador Sandoval Hernández
Severo Medina Lára
Elías Trujillo Macias
José Rodriguez Macias
Luis López Medina
Manuel Calderón Merino
Luis Cuevas Miranda
Martin Razo Navarro
Ignacio Pérez Navarro
Román Ochoa Ochoa
Ramón Paredes Gonzalez
Guadalupe Ramírez Lára
Apolonio Ramírez Placencia
Alberto Carlos Raygoza
Guadalupe Hernández Rodríguez
Maria Santana Rodríguez
Juan Valenzuela Ruiz
Wenceslao Flores Ruiz
José Valdívia Sánchez
Jesús Meza Santos
Baldomero Marcas Torres

Valerie. photoValerie Hamilton is an independent producer. She reports on issues on and around the U.S-Mexico border for U.S. and European public media. She’s based in Los Angeles.

TRUST Around the Country

Local governments in California, New Orleans, and Connecticut are implementing laws known as “TRUST acts,” limiting the scope of cooperation between local law enforcement and the federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency. We’ll hear pieces from Adrian Florido in California, Kate Richardson in New Orleans, and Lucy Nalpathanchil in Connecticut. We’ll also hear from a Connecticut TRUST act booster, state senate majority leader Martin Looney.

Photo: Josemaria Islas at a rally in New Haven, CT. His detention and pending deportation spurred the Connecticut TRUST act. Image courtesy of Unidad Latina En Acción.


looney-hi

Senator Looney is in his sixth term as Senate Majority Leader of the General Assembly, having first been elected to that leadership post in 2003. He is also Chair of the Executive and Legislative Nominations Committee and Vice Chair of the Legislative Management Committee. Since being elected to the State Senate in 1993 and prior to his election as Majority Leader, he served six years as Senate Chair of the Finance, Revenue and Bonding Committee; Chairman of the Banks Committee; and one term as Ranking Member of the Judiciary Committee.

RebeccaPlevin Adrian Florido is a reporter for the Fronteras Desk where he covers the U.S.-Mexico border, immigrant and tribal communities, demographics, and culture. Before joining KPBS, he was a staff writer at Voice of San Diego. There he reported on San Diego neighborhoods, focusing on immigrant and under-served communities as well as development, planning, land use, and transportation.

kate pic

Kate Richardson is from Houston, Texas. She is an independent radio producer and contributor to WWNO in New Orleans. She helps run a community media project called The Listening Post and teaches Spanish at Delgado Community College.

 

nalpathanchil by Chion Wolf

Lucy Nalpathanchil is WNPR’s All Things Considered Host and Correspondent. She’s an award-winning reporter who has worked in several states since starting her career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh. Lucy now lives in beautiful New England where she reports on news stories in the Connecticut region and contributes to National Public Radio.  While at WNPR, her stories have focused on immigration including New Haven’s controversial ID card program, efforts for an in-state tuition law for undocumented students, and the “Becoming American” series

 

Dangerous Deportations

Mexican deportees are often dropped off in dangerous border cities at night. Reporter Maria Zamudio takes us to the Mexican city of Matamoros to see what they face when they arrive.

For Maria’s report in The Chicago Reporter, click HERE.

Image courtesy of Maria Zamudio.

 

mzamudio2Maria Zamudio is an award-winning investigative reporter. She joined The Chicago Reporter Magazine to cover immigration, labor and health in 2011. Prior to joining the investigative magazine, she spent three years in California working for several daily newspapers. She’s a bilingual reporter and blogger with experience producing radio and video stories. She been awarded many prestigious fellowships including  the New York Times fellowship in 2003. She graduated from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2007.

 

 

Diversity Visa

You might think immigration reform would make it easier for people to come to the U.S. But one proposal on the table, the elimination of the Diversity Visa program would actually have the opposite effect. Matt Laslo reports.

Image courtesy of Flicker.

 

MATT-LASLOBased on Capitol Hill, Matt Laslo is a freelance reporter who has been covering Congress, the White House and the Supreme Court for more than five years. While he has filed stories for more than 40 local NPR stations, his work has also appeared in The Atlantic, The Chattanooga Times Free Press, National Public Radio, The Omaha World-Herald, Pacifica Radio, Politics

 

 

Santiago Postcard

Reporter Alexandra Hall sends us an audio postcard from Santiago, Chile, on the fortieth anniversary of the U.S. backed coup against Salvador Allende.

Image courtesy of Flickr.

 

Alexandra HallAlexandra Hall is an independent radio producer currently based in Santiago. She holds an M.A. in Latin American Studies from Columbia and a B.A. in Spanish from UC Santa Cruz. Alexandra is an intern with Chile’s finest news station, Radio Cooperativa, and the Co-host of NACLA Radio. She is best known for going rogue to get the story- from New England to the Southern Cone.

 

 

Intervention

This past week, the Obama administration considered attacking Syria because of its use of chemical weapons. Maria Hinojosa discusses what this means for Latinos given past interventions in Latin America.

Photo courtesy Flickr

Robert Litwak is Vice President for Scholars and Director of International Security Studies at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington. He is also an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service and a Consultant to the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Dr. Litwak served on the National Security Council staff as Director for Nonproliferation in the first Clinton administration.

 

“Latino Americans”

PBS debuts part one of a six-hour documentary American Latino history on Wednesday, September 17th. Host Maria Hinojosa talks to Vicki Ruiz, a UC Irvine historian featured in the series, and Jose Fulgencio, a young Latino blogger, about the series. The conversation focuses on the birth of anti-Latino immigrant rhetoric during the Great Depression and why this history is not taught in schools.

Photo courtesy PBS.

Vicki Ruiz is a professor of history at U.C. Irvine specializing in Chicano/Latino studies. Her research encompasses 20th century U.S. History, Chicano/Latino history through oral narratives, gender studies, labor and immigration.

 

 

 
Jose FulgencioJose Fulgencio is a blogger and public speaker. A young Latino first generation college graduate, he has a B.A. In Political Science form Northeastern Illinois University and a Master of Arts in Political Science form Oklahoma State University. His work has appeared in Urban Times, The Washington Times Communities and Policy Mic.

 

Sabiduría: Consuelo Castillo Kickbusch

We wrap up the show with another “Sabiduria,” or words of wisdom. Author and retired US Army Lieutenant Colonel Consuelo Castillo Kickbusch talks about about owning your past.

Photo courtesy of Flickr

 


Consuelo Castillo Kickbusch was born and raised along the border in a small barrio in Laredo, Texas. Although she grew up without material wealth, Consuelo was taught by her immigrant parents that she was rich in culture, tradition, values and faith. After graduating from Hardin Simmons University, Consuelo entered the U.S. Army as an officer and served for two decades. She became the highest-ranking Hispanic woman in the Combat Support Field of the U.S. Army. In 1996, Consuelo Castillo Kickbusch founded the human development company, Educational Achievement Services, Inc. (EAS, Inc.), tofulfill her mission of preparing tomorrow’s leaders. Consuelo Castillo Kickbusch is the proud mother of five daughters, the proud grandmother of 3, and currently resides in Las Vegas, Nevada with her husband, David.

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