Latino USA

Archive for 2013

Legalizing Love

On June 26th the US Supreme Court ruled the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional, paving the way for federal recognition of same-sex marriages and allowing Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender immigrant couples to apply for the same immigration benefits as straight couples. Pablo Garcia Gamez and Santiago Ortiz, a married couple from Queens, New York, discuss how the DOMA ruling has already changed their lives. Then, Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa speaks with Rachel Tiven, Executive Director of Immigration Equality, about the impact of the ruling.

Image courtesy of Immigration Equality/Judy G. Rolfe

 

To listen to more of Pablo and Santiago’s story, click HERE for the extended interview:

 

Santiago Ortiz and Pablo Garcia  Gamez
Santiago Ortiz and Pablo García Gamez have been together for 23 years. They married in Connecticut in 2011 and live in Elmhurst, Queens, New York. Santiago (left) was born in Manhattan’s Lower East Side to parents who migrated from Puerto Rico. Pablo (right) is a native of Venezuela, Caracas and has been living undocumented for over 20 years. He will now be able to apply for a green card as Santiago’s spouse. Once his immigration status is in order, he plans to begin teaching college Spanish.

Rachel Tiven is the Executive Director of Immigration Equality, a legal advocacy organization representing LGBTQ immigrants. Rachel received her law degree from Columbia Law School and her bachelor’s degree from Harvard.

 

Somos Muslims

As we approach the start of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, we explore the intersection of Muslim and Latino identities as part of our series on identity, Somos—Who We Are. Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa speaks with Hazel Gomez, a community organizer, Hamza Perez, an activist, and Wilfredo Amr Ruiz, an attorney and Muslim Chaplain.

 

And listen to the extended interview below:


 

 

Image Credit: Flickr

Hazel Gomez has worked as a community organizer for the last three years focusing on immigration reform, criminal justice reform, and the intersection between the two. Hazel is the daughter of Puerto Rican and Mexican parents and is committed to seeing the growth and deepening of Islam within Latino American communities. In the ever-growing mosaic of Islam in America, she is interested in the creation of an authentic Latino Muslim experience. She considers herself an active student of knowledge, having intermittently studied under some of the West’s most prominent and learned scholars, and currently exploring traditional paths of Islamic knowledge. She graduated from Loyola University Chicago with a B.S. in Forensic Science and two minors in Chemistry and Psychology of Crime and Justice.

Hamza Perez is the founder of the S.H.E.H.U. Program (Services Helping to Empower and Heal Urban Communities) and one of the co-founders of the Light of the Age Mosque in Pittsburgh PA. Hamza Perez was also ranked one of the top 500 most influential muslims in the world in 2010 by The Royal Islamic Strategic Studies Centre for his work with youth. In 2009 PBS released an award winning film titled “New Muslim Cool” about the life of Hamza Perez, his music and his community.

Wilfredo Amr Ruiz is also a Muslim Chaplain and Political Analyst on the Middle East and Muslim World. He is a regular columnist at various newspapers and electronic media outlets in New York, Puerto Rico and Spain. Attorney Ruiz is presently a Civil Rights Counsel for the Council of American Islamic Relations (CAIR Florida) and he is regularly interviewed and consulted at national and international media outlets on diverse issues on politics of the Middle East and the Muslim World, Islam and Christian-Muslim relations.

Newark Forró

For the latest dispatch in our series on Latino accordion music, we tune our ears to Brazilian forró, a high-energy dance sound from the country’s tropical Northeast came to fame in the 1940s. Reporter Marlon Bishop brings us this accordion story from the vibrant Brazilian community of Newark, New Jersey.

 

Marlon is a radio producer, writer, and reporter based in New York. His work is focused on music, Latin America, New York City and the arts, and has appeared in several public radio outlets such as WNYC News, Studio 360, The World and NPR News. He is an Associate Producer at Afropop Worldwide and a staff writer for MTV Iggy.

 

 

 

 

Deporting the Statue

Host Maria Hinojosa  reflects on a question raised by an online video: what if we treated Lady Liberty the same way we treated other undocumented people?

Check out the entire “Deport the Statue” video below:

This Week’s Captions: DECISIONS, DECISIONS AT THE SUPREME COURT

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, the U.S. Supreme Court decides on crucial cases for Latinos.

For “News or Noise?” we talk about unpaid internships and their effects on journalism. Then, visit a dual language program in Florida, the state where bilingual education began. Finally, ten years after the U.S Navy ceased its practice range bombings in Vieques, artists get together to raise money for a radio station that will help Viequenses cope with new challenges.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Decisions, Decisions at the Supreme Court

The Supreme Court ruled its last batch of decisions on several cases that directly impact Latinos and other people of color. Among these, a decision that invalidates one of the most important provisions of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Myrna Perez, Deputy Director at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law, talks about some of these cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr/SEIU

 

 

pabloMyrna Perez is a senior counsel for the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, a legal research and advocacy organization at New York University. She also works on a variety of voting rights related issues, including redistricting, voter registration list maintenance, and access to the ballot box. Before joining the center, Ms. Pérez was the Civil Rights Fellow at Relman & Dane, a civil rights law firm in Washington, D.C.

News or Noise? The Intern Edition

Interns are challenging their unpaid status in court. In recent one federal case, courts ruled in their favor, saying they should have been paid for their work. Maria Hinojosa discusses the case and its coverage with journalist and media critic Farai Chidey and Latino USA summer intern Hanna Guerrero.

Image courtesy of

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head_shot_lasloFarai Chideya has combined media, technology, and socio-political analysis during her 20-year career as an award-winning author and journalist. She is a Distinguished Writer in Residence at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute

 

head_shot_lasloHanna Guerrero is a journalism student at DePaul University. She is a summer intern at Latino USA.

Dual Language Central

It’s been 50 years since the nation’s first bilingual education program started in Miami. Reporter Trina Sargalski  visits the Coral Way elementary school to find out the secret of its success.

Image courtesy of flickr.com/photos/librariesrock


head_shot_lasloTrina Sargalski is a freelance producer and reporter. She covers food and South Florida life for WLRN Miami Herald News. She also writes about food as the Miami editor of Tasting Table and as the editor of her own blog, Miami Dish.

Radio Vieques

For more than five decades, the U.S Navy used the Puerto Rican island of Vieques as a practice bombing range. Ten years after the Navy pulled out of the island, Viequenses struggle with health problems they say are caused by environmental toxins left by the bombings. That’s why artists from Puerto Rico are coming together to raise funds for Radio Vieques, a new community radio station that will inform Viequenses and help them navigate their future.

Image courtesy of Flickr

 

This Week’s Captions: TACKLING THE GOP’S LATINO PROBLEM

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we bring you a report on the GOP’s Congressional split over how to fix immigration, and a roundtable discussion on the severed Latino/Republican relationship. Then, words of encouragement for the Mexican-American boy who sang the national anthem at the NBA finals Mariachi style who later received a wave of racist remarks. We also take you to Woodburn, a town in Oregon whose Latino population is the highest in the state, 60%. Finally, we pay tribute to Arturo Vega, the so-called fifth member of the punk band The Ramones, who died earlier this month.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

THIS WEEK'S CAPTIONS: Let's...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: In this week's show,…

This Week's Captions: Money...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: From Puerto Rico to…

CAPTIONS

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