Latino USA

Archive for 2013

The Enforcement Taboo

From rallies in the Capitol, to acts of protest near the Texas/Mexico border, to a federal court room in New York, immigration activists give a final push to ensure that Congress delivers the long awaited bill reforming immigration policy and enforcement. María Hinojosa speaks to Juan Cartagena, president and general counsel of Latino Justice PRLDEF based in New York City.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of the Wilson Center’s Mexican Institute.

juanJuan Cartagena is the president and general counsel for LatinoJustice PRLDEF. He is a constitutional and civil rights attorney with experience in employment rights, language rights, voting rights, public education financing, environmental law, housing and access to public hospitals.

The Congressional Potluck

So far, we’ve gotten a taste of what the Senate is preparing around immigration: but what’s cooking at the House? María Hinojosa talks to two leading voices shaping immigration legislation in the House of Representatives.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of the Wilson Center’s Mexican Institute.

Gutierrez headshotCongressman Luis V. Gutierrez is a senior Democrat on the House Financial Services Committee, serving as the of the Committee on Financial Services’ Subcommittee on Domestic and International Monetary Policy, Trade, and Technology in the 110th Congress, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit Subcommittee in the 111th Congress, and as the Ranking Member of the Housing, Insurance, and Community Opportunity Subcommittee in the 112th Congress. He played a significant role in shaping the (“Dodd-Frank”) Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in the 111th Congress, focusing particularly on consumer credit issues, remittances, and preventing future tax-payer funded bailouts of financial firms deemed “too big to fail.”

Becerra headshotCongressman Xavier Becerra was first elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1992, and serves as Chairman of the House Democratic Caucus. He is a member of the Committee on Ways And Means and is Ranking Member of the Ways and Means Subcommittee on Social Security. He was the first Latino to serve on the Ways and Means Committee, and is a member of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus (CHC) where he served as Chair during the 105th Congress (1997-98).

After the Prize

Quiara Alegría Hudes won the 2012 Pulitzer for her play “Water by the Spoonful,” about a Puerto Rican vet who returns to family strife in Philadelphia. It’s the second in a trilogy, and Maria Hinojosa speaks to the playwright just before the opening of the third play, “The Happiest Song Plays Last.”


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of The Goodman Theatre. Click here for more information on “The Happiest Song Plays Last.”

HudesQuiara_288x375Quiara Alegría Hudes is the author of “Water by the Spoonful,” winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. “Water by the Spoonful” is the second in a trilogy of plays. The first, “Elliot, A Soldier’s Fugue,” was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in 2007. She wrote the book for the Broadway musical “In the Heights,” which received the 2008 Tony Award for Best Musical, a Tony nomination for Best Book of a Musical, and was a 2009 Pulitzer Prize finalist.Hudes received a B.A. in music cum laude from Yale University and an M.F.A. in playwriting from Brown, She was recently inducted into the Central High School Hall of Fame–the first Latina and among the first group of women to receive this honor since the school’s founding in 1836. She now lives in New York with her husband and daughter.

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: IMMIGRANTS AND SOLITARY CONFINEMENT

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we look into immigrants in solitary confinement. Is it necessary, and how is it being handled? Then, a group of fourth graders travel from California to Washington, DC, to demand that their classmate, Rodrigo Guzman, be allowed back into the United States. And, the Associated Press announced it will stop using the term “illegal immigrant.” So is this news or is it noise? Finally, we get a peek inside the tempestuous relationship between Mexican artists Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, in their own words.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Immigrants and Solitary Confinement

On any given day, some 300 people in U.S immigration detention centers are placed in special “segregation.” Researchers say the practice of solitary confinement can be especially detrimental to immigrant detainees’ mental health. Catherine Rentz, with the Investigative Reporting Workshop at American University, looks at how widespread the practice is, why detainees are put in solitary, and how long they stay.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Catherine Rentz, The Investigative Reporting Workshop.  

CRentz-150x150Catherine Rentz is a reporter and documentary filmmaker in residence at the Investigative Reporting Workshop at American University in Washington D.C. She’s produced several documentaries for PBS FRONTLINE about the airline industry, environmental resources, retirement finances, U.S. intelligence apparatus and immigration.

Little Dreamers

Nine-year-old Rodrigo Guzman was denied entry back into the United States after a routine visit to Mexico with his family. When his classmates at Jefferson Elementary School in Berkeley heard about Rodrigo’s dilemma, they started an online campaign to allow the family to return. Reporter Andrew Stelzer reports on the fourth-graders’ efforts to petition Congress for Rodrigo’s return, and for a fair and logical federal immigration policy.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Andrew Stelzer. 

andrew-stelzer-headshotAndrew Stelzer is an award winning radio producer and news reporter, currently working as a producer and host at the National Radio Project in Oakland, CA. Andrew’s radio work has been featured nationally and Internationally on programs including NPR’s Weekend Edition, PRI’s The World, Studio 360, Weekend America, Marketplace, Living on Earth, On the Media, Free Speech Radio News, Latino USA, Only a Game, Radio Netherlands, World Radio Switzerland, Independent Native News, Radio France International, and the Workers Independent News Service. He also files regularly for KQED radio news in San Francisco.

“News or Noise?”: Illegal Immigrant

The Associated Press announced it will stop using the term “illegal immigrant.” For our “News or Noise?” segment –where we take a look at media matters that may involve misunderstanding or misinformation— Latino USA host María Hinojosa talks to the Poynter Institute’s Kenny Irby about why this matters.


Click here to download this week’s show.  Image courtesy of Cuentame.

Check out the post on the AP blog, “Illegal immigrant no more.”

Click here to take the quiz!

Having trouble taking the quiz on your mobile device? Go to the quiz directly here.

News or Noise logo final option 2-01“News or Noise?” is a dynamic multiplatform radio project produced by Latino USA to encourage listeners to think critically about the news. Supported by Chicago’s Robert R. McCormick Foundation as part of its “Why News Matters” initiative, this year-long series of radio reports will explore top stories in the news cycle around which there is extensive commentary, misinformation, confusion or misunderstanding. The companion “News or Noise?” online quiz, (schedule here), will ask listeners to put their critical reasoning skills to the test as they discern fact from fabrication about each news topic.

Kenny Irby.photoKenny Irby is Poynter’s senior faculty and director of community relations. He’s also the director of the Write Field initiative, a dynamic new academic enrichment and mentoring program for middle school minority male youth. Irby founded Poynter’s photojournalism program in 1995.

Frida & Diego in Their Own Words

An exhibition at the High Museum in Atlanta portrays Mexican artists Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera in a new way. Along with their paintings, there are quotes from each artist about their tempestuous relationship and the tumultuous times they lived in.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Flickr.

Rich Halten2Rich Halten has had a nearly life-long love affair with radio. It started when he was 13, hanging around a station in his Florida hometown. By 16 he was spinning records after school and weekends at the station. He went on to work in radio and TV through college and even during his Army hitch, serving at the American Forces Network in Europe. After a successful career in advertising, Rich returned to his radio roots. Following a stint as a producer at an Atlanta Sports/Talk station, he segued to public radio. In the past five years he’s produced short and long-form pieces that aired on NPR stations around the country, as well as Radio National Australia, and were featured on-line. He continues to be guided by the belief that the pictures ARE better on the radio.

This Week’s Captions: Ethnic Studies Revisited

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, Latino USA guest host Felix Contreras talks to News Taco’s Victor Landa for a round up on prominent Latinos in entertainment, politics and religion; Then, we follow-up on the state of Ethnic Studies in U.S education. And we talk to the lead vocalist of Piñata Protest, fusing punk with traditional Mexican music. Finally, we pay tribute to Cuban pianist Bebo Valdes who died recently at age 94.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

News Taco: Who’s Latino?

Is Jorge Bergoglio, aka Pope Francis, Latino? Does it matter? Why did Bruno Mars drop his Puerto Rican father’s surname? And who is the new Obama staffer Miguel Rodriguez? Latino USA guest host Felix Contreras gets the answers in conversation with Victor Landa, editor of the site News Taco.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Flickr.

Victor-150x150Victor Landa is the founder and editor of NewsTaco, a website that provides news, analysis and critique from a Latino perspective. He worked as a writer and editor for 30 years, mostly with Telemundo and Univisión. Landa also contributed to the San Antonio Express-News, and he is an adviser on media strategy, message crafting, storytelling and public speaking.

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