NOTICIANDO: NEWS TACO, THE GERALDO EDITION

While journalist Geraldo Rivera talks about a Senate run, Sen. Robert Menendez faces prostitution related allegations; and a new study looks at Mexican immigrants and their hesitation with U.S. citizenship. We speak to Victor Landa, editor of News Taco for a news round-up.

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Victor Landa is the founder and editor of NewsTaco, a website that provides news, analysis and critique from a Latino perspective. He worked as a writer and editor for 30 years, mostly with Telemundo and Univisión. Landa also contributed to the San Antonio Express-News, and he is an adviser on media strategy, message crafting, storytelling and public speaking.

 

IMMIGRATION REFORM, SERVED TWO WAYS

Two proposals for comprehensive immigration reform were released this week, from a bipartisan Senate committee and from President Obama. As we launch into political negotiations for more detailed plans, we ask: is this a breakthrough, or are we headed to another impasse as in previous years? We speak to New York Times reporter Julia Preston about the developing plans.

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Click here to download this week’s show. [Image courtesy of Fox News.]

Julia Preston was a member of The New York Times staff that won the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for reporting on international affairs for its series that profiled the corrosive effects of drug corruption in Mexico. Ms. Preston came to The Times in July 1995 after working at the Washington Post for nine years as a foreign correspondent. She is a 1997 recipient of the Maria Moors Cabot Prize for distinguished coverage of Latin America and a 1994 winner of the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Humanitarian Journalism.

Born in Lake Forest, Ill., on May 29, 1951, Ms. Preston received a B.A. degree in Latin American Studies from Yale University in 1976. She speaks fluent Spanish and Portuguese. She has one daughter.

CINDY’S STORY

What does being in the “back of the line” mean for today’s undocumented immigrants? We speak to DREAMer Cindy about her opinion on both the Senate and the President’s proposal and her feelings on how effective either proposal would be.

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Click here to download this week’s show. [Photo courtesy of Flickr.]

 

 

THE AGENDA OF THE LAMB

Evangelicals are emerging as a growing force among Latinos in the U.S. One person, in particular, is often cited as a leader of the movement –  the Reverend Samuel Rodriguez. In late January, Rodriguez became the first Latino ever to give the keynote address at the Martin Luther King Jr. commemoration in Atlanta. Latino USA’s Andres Caballero has a profile of the charismatic minister from Sacramento.

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Andrés Caballero has been an active contributor to Latino USA for more than a year. He holds a M.S. in Journalism from the Columbia University School of Journalism, and a B.S. in Political Science from Notre Dame De Namur University. He covers issues that affect Latinos across the U.S., and he has also contributed to New America Media, the Hispanic Link News Service in Washington D.C., and El Tecolote in San Francisco.

NOTICIANDO: DEADLY SOUTH TEXAS

With border enforcement front and center in both immigration reform proposals, security and migration issues are stepping into the limelight. The Washington Office on Latin America found that South Texas was different from other border regions. Senior Associate for Regional Security at WOLA Adam Isacson explains the findings—and reveals the sometimes deadly truths.

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Adam Isacson is a key member of WOLA’s Regional Security Policy team. He is a leading expert on defense, civil-military relations, and U.S. security assistance to the Americas. He collaborates on Just the Facts—a constantly updated source of information and analysis of the United States’ often troubled relationship with Latin America’s militaries. He helped found Just the Facts in the early 1990s.

Mr. Isacson has co-authored dozens of publications, including “Ready, Aim, Foreign Policy” and “Waiting for Change,” which examine the increasing role of the military in U.S. foreign policy. He has testified before Congress on international drug policy, Colombia’s conflict, U.S. military aid programs and human rights, and has organized several congressional delegations to the region.

SONIA’S BELOVED WORLD

Maria Hinojosa talks to Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor who has written a memoir called “My Beloved World.” The book tells the story of Sotomayor’s childhood in the South Bronx and her years before the court.

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Judge Sonia Sotomayor has lived the American dream. Born to a Puerto Rican family, she grew up in a public housing project in the South Bronx. Her judicial service began in October 1992 with her appointment to the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York by President George H.W. Bush. President Clinton appointed Judge Sotomayor to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in 1998. She was the first Latina to serve on that court, and participated in over 3000 panel decisions, authoring roughly 400 published opinions.

Over a distinguished career that spans three decades, Judge Sotomayor has worked at almost every level of our judicial system, eventually becoming the first Hispanic, and only the third woman, to ever be appointed to the United States Supreme Court.

PICTURE PERFECT BRONX

A group of Nuyorican photographers from the South Bronx has a new photo exhibit on display. The group calls itself “Los Seis del Sur”…six from the South. They chronicled everyday life in their neighborhoods during the late ‘70s and early ‘80s, when crime, drugs and arson were ravaging the Bronx. The six were just young men at the time, but they created a photographic history that no outsiders could rival. Lily Jamali reports.

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Click here to download this week’s show. Image by Lily Jamali.

Lily Jamali is a New York-based journalist who reports across the platforms of television, radio, and the web. Her work has taken her around the world to Europe, Asia, and Latin America and has been featured on NBC, CNN, PRI/BBC’s “The World”, and the CBC. Follow her on Twitter: @lilyjamali

DOLORES, FROM THE HEART

We say farewell to Cuban-American writer, Dolores Prida. She died in New York on the eve of the presidential inauguration, just after attending a party celebrating 20 years of friendship and mutual support with Latina journalists, publicists and lawyers.

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NOTICIANDO: ARKANSAS IMMIGRATION

A new study shows the economic impact of Arkansas’ booming immigrant population. Maria Hinojosa talks with Dr. Sherece West-Scantlebury, president and CEO of the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation, about the study’s findings.

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Sherece Y. West-Scantlebury is president and CEO of the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation, a private, independent foundation whose mission is to improve the lives of all Arkansans in three interrelated areas: economic development; education; and economic, racial and social justice.

Involved in philanthropy for close to 20 years, Dr. West-Scantlebury served as CEO at the Foundation for Louisiana and as a program associate at the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Her professional career includes nearly 25 years of experience in community development, public policy and advocacy, and public service.

NEWS TACO: CH-CH-CHANGES

We speak to News Taco Editor Victor Landa for a roundup on recent changes in U.S. politics: from Republicans regrouping in Florida to signs of hope for culturally relevant courses in Arizona schools.

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Click here to download this week’s show.

Victor Landa is the founder and editor of NewsTaco, a website that provides news, analysis and critique from a Latino perspective. He worked as a writer and editor for 30 years, mostly with Telemundo and Univisión. Landa also contributed to the San Antonio Express-News, and he is an adviser on media strategy, message crafting, storytelling and public speaking.