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A new comprehensive study released this month is concluding that the country’s Latino population “is growing, young, increasingly educated, employed, connected, entrepreneurial, and upwardly mobile in terms of income as well as consumption.”

Authored by Dr. Jeffrey A. Eisenach of NERA Economic Consulting and commissioned by the Latino Donor Collaborative (LDC) and the Royal Bank of Canada, “Making America Rich Again: The Latino Effect on Economic Growth” provides a deep statistical dive into the current and future state of the U.S. Latino population.

Yahoo Finance reported that LDC co-founder Sol Trujillo “had one primary objective for the report: to debunk Latino stereotypes. He says they were able to find empirical evidence that Latinos are playing a critical role in rejuvenating the American workforce.” It also reported that Eisenach is a member of President-elect Donald Trump’s transition team, but as Eisenach told Yahoo Finance, “The study is completely separate from my relationship with Trump. I embarked on this as an economist.”

Some of the study’s findings include:

“Between 1990 and 2015, the Latino population grew from 22 million to 57 million, roughly five times as fast as the population overall. To illustrate this rapid growth, consider that if the Latino population had grown at the same rate as the rest of the U.S., there would be 30 million fewer Americans today.”

“At 28 years old, the median Latino is nine years younger than the population at large and 15 years younger than the median white. Millennials make up 26 percent of the Hispanic population, compared to 22 percent for the U.S. population.”

“Latinos are responsible for 29 percent of the growth in real income since 2005. They account for roughly 10 cents of every dollar of U.S. national income, and that proportion is rising both due to growth in the Latino population and rising per capita earnings.”

“[Latinos] are more likely to participate in the labor force (65.9 percent vs. 62.7 percent) and to be employed (61.6 percent vs. 59.3 percent) than the overall U.S. population. While Latinos account for 17 percent of all workers, they account for 21 percent of new entrepreneurs. Latinos accounted for nearly half —46 percent— of the growth in employment from 2011 to 2015.”

You can access the complete report here: