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A new analysis from Pew Research Center published Tuesday concluded that the “number of unauthorized immigrants living in the United States in 2015 fell below the total at the end of the Great Recession for the first time” and that Mexicans continue “to represent a declining share of this population.”

The study, co-authored by senior demographer Jeffrey S. Passel and senior writer/editor D’Vera Cohn, produced the estimates, using the latest government data. All the estimates applied to years from the Obama administration and does not include any 2017 data from the Trump administration.

According to Pew, in 2015 11 million unauthorized were living in the United States. In 2009, Pew’s estimate was at 11.3 million for 2009, the year it identified as the final year of the Great Recession. Pew also gave a preliminary estimate that 2016 unauthorized immigrant population is 11.3 million, which, it said “is statistically no different from the 2009 or 2015 estimates and comes from a different data source with a smaller sample size and a larger margin of error.”

“This more recent preliminary data for 2016 are inconclusive as to whether the total unauthorized immigrant population continued to decrease, held steady or increased,” Passel and Cohn wrote.

The study also said that the number of unauthorized Mexicans immigrants in 2015 was 5.6 million (51% of the total unauthorized immigrant population for that year), marking a decline from 2007, when the Mexican population was 6.9 million (57% of the total).

As for 2016, “the number of unauthorized immigrants from Mexico was the same, but their share fell to 50% of the total, marking the first time since at least 2005 that Mexicans did not account for a majority of the unauthorized immigrant population,” the report stated.

The Pew co-authors also covered other regions outside of Mexico, writing the following: “As the number of Mexicans has decreased, the number of unauthorized immigrants from other parts of the world has increased. The estimated number from countries other than Mexico declined from 5.3 million in 2007 to 5 million in 2009, but grew after that, reaching 5.4 million in 2015 and 5.7 million in the preliminary 2016 estimate.”

Click here to read the full report.