CHICAGO SHUTDOWNS: WHAT’S LOST

Despite strong protests, the city of Chicago announced it would close 50 neighborhood public schools at the end of this school year. Students from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University reported on several of the schools listed for closure. One was home to an innovative program for children with special needs, the other ran health care and food programs for the neighborhood at large. Bryan Lowry, Jennifer Kirby report. Carrie Eidson contributed to this report.

Image courtesy of Flickr/chicagopublicradio.

Lowry Edit

Bryan Lowry is a graduate student in journalism at Northwestern University’s Medill School, specializing in public affairs reporting. He previously served as an English teacher in the San Francisco Unified School District for three years. The experience of working with children from San Francisco’s often overlooked low-income communities inspired him to embark on a career as journalist to tell the type of stories that sometimes fall through the cracks. He is a native of Pennsylvania and a graduate of Boston University.

KirbyPhotoJen Kirby is a graduate student at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, where she focuses on magazine writing and urban reporting. She previously worked in the non-profit sector and received her bachelor’s degree in international politics from Georgetown University in Washington, DC.

 

eidsonCarrie Eidson is a graduate student at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, where she focuses on urban affairs reporting. She is a native of Asheville, North Carolina.

 

THE SCIENCE OF “LATINA”

Dominican-American author Raquel Cepeda went on a search to find out about her heritage and identity. How? Through ancestral DNA testing. María Hinojosa speaks with Cepeda about her memoir, “Bird of Paradise: How I Became Latina.”

Raquel.photoRaquel Cepeda is an award-winning journalist, cultural activist and documentary filmmaker. A former magazine editor, her byline has appeared in The Village Voice, CNN.com, and the Associated Press. She directed and produced “Bling: A Planet Rock,” about American hip-hop culture’s obsession with diamonds.

SECRET REBEL

Cuban immigrant Loreta Velazquez once disguised herself as a man just so she could fight in the Civil War. We speak to writer and director María Agui Carter about her film, “Rebel,” premiering nationwide on PBS.

Image courtesy of Flickr/TradingCardsNPS.

MariaMaría Agui Carter emigrated to the U.S. from Ecuador, grew up an undocumented “Dreamer” in New York City, and graduated from Harvard College. A filmmaker and scholar, she has won the George Peabody Gardner, Warren and Rockefeller Grants and has been a visiting scholar at Harvard and Tulane. Her work has been shown at film festivals and has been broadcast internationally. Based in Boston, she is an advocate for Latino and social issue filmmakers. She currently serves as the Chair of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers.

 

 

Watch Rebel – Preview on PBS. See more from VOCES.

CUTTING CHICAGO SCHOOLS

In Chicago, officials plan to shutter 54 schools they say are under-utilized. The closings are expected to save the city millions of dollars, but many are angry and upset. Students from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University examine the impact at two schools in a heavily Latino neighborhood on the west side. Paige Sutherland, Tanya Basu, Ananth Baliga and Lisa Carter report.

Image courtesy of Flickr/chicagopublicradio.

TanyaTanya Basu is a graduate student at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, where she focuses on economic reporting.

 

Lisa CarterLisa Carter is a journalism graduate student at Northwestern University. She is a native Texan who has written for publications in Chicago, Las Vegas, New York City, Austin and San Antonio.

 

 

ananthAnanth Baliga is from Mumbai, India and he is currently studying public policy reporting at the Medill School of Journalism. He began to study software engineering, but switched careers to follow his interest in political and public policy reporting. He previously worked in New Delhi Television, a national news channel in New Delhi, India, as an intern reporter.

 

Sutherland_biopicPaige Sutherland is a graduate student at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, where she focuses on urban reporting. She is originally from Boston, MA and received her bachelor’s degree from the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA.

DIA DE LOS TRADEMARKS, “NEWS OR NOISE?”

When Disney tried to trademark “Dia de los Muertos” for their new movie merchandise inspired by the Mexican holiday, Latinos went online and turned things back around. For this week’s “News or Noise?” Latino USA guest host Luis Antonio Perez speaks with Kety Esquivel, digital media strategist and Vice President for Fenton, about how Latinos online retaliated against the entertainment giant.

Illustration by Lalo Alcaraz; Image courtesy of Pocho.Com, where you can see the whole illustration. 

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KetyKety Esquivel leads the digital practice for Fenton’s Western region with nearly 20 years of experience in the private and public sectors. Her commentaries has been featured in stories on the Wall St. Journal, HITN, PBS, CNN, Televisa and Univision. She also served as the New Media Manager for the National Council of La Raza and the interim CEO for Latinos in Social Media.

Lalo_hs-150x150Lalo Alcaraz is the creator of the first nationally-syndicated, politically-themed Latino daily comic strip, “La Cucaracha,” seen in scores of newspapers including the Los Angeles Times. He is also co-host of KPFK Radio’s popular satirical talk show, “The Pocho Hour of Power,” and co-founded the political satire comedy group Chicano Secret Service. His work has appeared in major publications around the world and he has won numerous awards and honors. Alcaraz received his Bachelor’s degree from San Diego State University, and earned his master’s degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a faculty member at Otis College of Art & Design in Los Angeles. Alcaraz was born in San Diego and grew up on the border. He is married to a hard-working public school teacher and they have three extremely artistic children.

LeafferMarshall Leaffer is a copyright-law expert and professor at Indiana University’s Maurer School of Law.

 

TIJUANA ROLLER GIRLS

Women’s roller derby keeps gaining popularity in the United States, and now, it’s spreading south of the border, to Tijuana. Erin Siegal reports from Baja California on the sport’s fierce feminine machismo.

Image courtesy of Erin Siegal.

es-amlo-mitinErin Siegal is a photographer, writer, and a TV and web producer, and radio reporter. Her work has appeared in the New Yorker, the New York Times, Time magazine, Rolling Stone, O Magazine, Newsweek, and many other magazines and newspapers. She’s currently a Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism, and a 2012 Soros Media Justice Fellow.

POSTVILLE FIVE YEARS LATER

Five years ago, Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents closed in on a kosher slaughterhouse in Iowa and carried out the largest immigration raid in U.S history. Latino USA host María Hinojosa speaks with filmmaker Luis Argueta, director of “Abused: the Postville Raid,” a documentary about the raid’s impact on immigrant families and on the town.

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Click here to download this week’s show. Image: Abused Documentary Facebook.

Luis Argueta (photo by Bea Gallardo)Luis Argueta is a film director and producer whose work spans features, documentaries, shorts and episodic TV. He has also worked as commercial director, lecturer and teacher in the United States, Europe and throughout the Americas.  Born and raised in Guatemala, Argueta is a US Citizen and has been a resident of New York since 1977. His film The Silence of Neto is the only Guatemalan film ever to have been submitted to the Academy Awards competition and he is the only Guatemalan director to have received a CLIO. In April 2009, the British newspaper The Guardian, listed Mr. Argueta as one of Guatemala’s National Living Icons, alongside Nobel Laureate Rigoberta Menchu and Singer/Songwriter Ricardo Arjona.

 

FOR BULLETS, IT’S OPEN BORDERS

Why are U.S Border Patrol agents shooting into Mexico and killing innocent civilians? Latino USA host María Hinojosa speaks with John Carlos Frey, author of investigative report, “Over the Line,” that looks into the increase in fatal shootings of Mexican nationals, by border patrol agents.

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Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of John Carlos Frey.

john-carlos-frey-cropped_150John Carlos Frey is a freelance investigative reporter and documentary filmmaker based in Los Angeles. His investigative work has been featured on the 60 Minutes episode, “The All American Canal;” a three-part series for PBS entitled “Crossing the Line;” and several episodes of Dan Rather Reports, “Angel of the Desert,” and “Operation Streamline.” In 2011 Frey documented the journey of Mexican migrants across the US-Mexico border and walked for days in the Arizona desert risking his own life for the documentary Life and Death on the Border”. John Carlos Frey has also written articles for the Los Angeles Times, the Huffington Post, Salon, Need to Know online, the Washington Monthly, and El Diario (in Spanish). Frey’s documentary films include The Invisible Mexicans of Deer Canyon (2007), The Invisible Chapel (2008), and The 800 Mile Wall (2009). He is the 2012 recipient of the Scripps Howard Award and the Sigma Delta Chi award for his Investigative Fund/PBS reporting on the excessive use of force by the US Border Patrol.

TO BE, OR NOT TO BE

The decision to be a mother is just as important as the choice not to become one. This Mother’s Day, Latino USA Editor Leda Hartman brings us a commentary about deciding to become –or not become– a mom.

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Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of MamasDay.Org

Leda.1Leda Hartman is a print and broadcast writer, reporter and editor. She is a longtime contributor to nationally broadcast public radio programs. Her work has aired on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Marketplace, Latino USA, Living on Earth, Studio 360, and The World and Voice of America.

LAST DAYS OF DUROVILLE

Thousands of farmworker families in California’s eastern Coachella Valley live in mobile home parks. They’re cheap and convenient to the farms but many of them are in terrible conditions. One of them –Duroville– is closing by court order and most of its residents are moving into a new park built with county money allocated before major budget cuts. In the new budget reality, some advocates say don’t close the bad parks –let them stay open and renovate slowly. Lisa Morehouse reports.

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Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Lisa Morehouse. 

Lisa-Morehouse-150x150Lisa Morehouse is an award-winning independent public radio and print journalist, who’s filed for KQED’s The California Report, NPR’s Latino USA and All Things Considered, Edutopia magazine and McSweeney’s. Her reporting has taken her from Samoan traveling circuses to Mississippi Delta classrooms to the homes of Lao refugees in rural Iowa.  She’s currently working on After The Gold Rush: The Future of Rural California, an audio documentary website and series. A former public school teacher, Morehouse also works with at-risk youth to produce radio diaries.