A PIECE OF A FALLING STAR

New Mexico poet Carlos Contreras works teaching inmates and writes about addiction and poverty in his community. He reads an excerpt from his poem “Falling Star.”

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Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Just Write. See Carlos Contreras performing another poem here.

 Carlos Contreras is a twenty-six-year-old poet who competed on the team that brought the National Poetry Slam Championship home to his native Albuquerque. His many other awards include the New Mexico Hispanic Entertainers Award for Poet of the Year in 2007. As a high school student, Carlos was accepted into the Voces program at the National Hispanic Cultural Center, a month-long workshop in poetry composition and performance. The next year he returned as an intern and mentor. Today, with a degree in English and Sociology from the University of New Mexico, he is the lead coordinator of the program. He has published poems in several anthologies, and a book, A Man in Pieces: Poems for My Father. Contreras performs solo and in groups around the state and the nation. Bio and headshot care of El Palacio.

WHEN BORDER PATROL CROSSES THE LINE

A new report by the immigrant rights group Families for Freedom and the New York University School of Law Immigrant Rights Clinic found that Border Patrol agents were making unlawful arrests alongside the US-Canada border. We speak to co-author and New York University School of Law professor Nancy Morawetz about the report’s findings.

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Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of The News House (creative commons).

Nancy Morawetz is a Professor of Clinical Law at New York University School of Law, where she co-directs the Immigrant Rights Clinic (IRC). Professor Morawetz supervises students in immigration court, federal district court, the courts of appeals and the Supreme Court. Professor Morawetz and her students also work on a range of projects assisting community based organizations. Professor Morawetz serves as the chair of the Supreme Court Immigration Law Working Group, which monitors cases working their way to the Court and participates in amicus briefing. Professor Morawetz’s writings include Counterbalancing Distorted Incentives in Supreme Court Pro Bono Practice: Recommendations for the New Supreme Court Pro Bono Bar and Public Interest Practice Communities, 86 N.Y.U. L. Rev. 131 (2011); Rethinking Drug Inadmissibility, 50 Wm. & Mary L. Rev. 163 (2008); Citizenship and the Courts, 2007 U. Chi. Legal F. 447 (2007); The Invisible Border: Restrictions on Short-Term Travel By Noncitizens, 21 Geo. Imm. L. J. 201 (2007); Determining the Retroactive Effect of Laws Altering the Consequences of Criminal Convictions, 30 Ford. Urb. L. J. 1743 (2003); Understanding the Impact of the 1996 Deportation Laws and the Limited Scope of Proposed Reforms, 113 Harv. L. Rev. 1936 (2000); and Rethinking Retroactive Deportation Laws and the Due Process Clause, 73 N.Y.U.L. Rev. 97 (1998).

OLD REFORM, NEW LESSONS

Critics of the “path to citizenship” provisions of the immigration reform blueprint call it amnesty and say it will cost the American taxpayer millions to legalize the undocumented. From the Fronteras Desk, reporter Adrian Florido looks back on the 1986 immigration act to see what impact it had on wages and jobs — and what it costs.

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Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Hispanic Nashville (creative commons).

Adrian Florido is a reporter for the Fronteras Desk where he covers the U.S.-Mexico border, immigrant and tribal communities, demographics, and culture. Before joining KPBS, he was a staff writer at Voice of San Diego. There he reported on San Diego neighborhoods, focusing on immigrant and under-served communities as well as development, planning, land use, and transportation. For a year, he delivered a weekly television segment on NBC San Diego.He’s a Southern California native who moved to San Diego in 2009 after earning an undergraduate degree at the University of Chicago. He majored in history with an emphasis on the US and Latin America. In college he was news editor of the student paper, the Chicago Maroon, and also spent time reporting from Capitol Hill and working with the advocacy group Reporters Without Borders.

FROM TIGRES TO TIGRILLOS: RAUL Y MEXIA

New brotherly duo Raul y Mexia debuted their first album, Arriba y Lejos. But the siblings are no strangers to the music scene. We speak to them about their new album and about growing up as the sons of Norteño giants Los Tigres del Norte.

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Click here to download this week’s show.


Raul Hernandez and Hernan Hernandez Jr (Raul y Mexia) are musicians and the sons of Hernan Hernandez of Los Tigres del Norte. They first burst into the music scene with a video they made for Todos Somos Arizona in which they spoke out against Arizona’s SB 1070. Their first album, Arriba y Lejos just debuted on Nacional Records. Photo courtesy of Vivelo Hoy. More info here.

NOTICIANDO: NEWS TACO, THE GERALDO EDITION

While journalist Geraldo Rivera talks about a Senate run, Sen. Robert Menendez faces prostitution related allegations; and a new study looks at Mexican immigrants and their hesitation with U.S. citizenship. We speak to Victor Landa, editor of News Taco for a news round-up.

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Click here to download this week’s show.

Victor Landa is the founder and editor of NewsTaco, a website that provides news, analysis and critique from a Latino perspective. He worked as a writer and editor for 30 years, mostly with Telemundo and Univisión. Landa also contributed to the San Antonio Express-News, and he is an adviser on media strategy, message crafting, storytelling and public speaking.

 

IMMIGRATION REFORM, SERVED TWO WAYS

Two proposals for comprehensive immigration reform were released this week, from a bipartisan Senate committee and from President Obama. As we launch into political negotiations for more detailed plans, we ask: is this a breakthrough, or are we headed to another impasse as in previous years? We speak to New York Times reporter Julia Preston about the developing plans.

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Click here to download this week’s show. [Image courtesy of Fox News.]

Julia Preston was a member of The New York Times staff that won the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for reporting on international affairs for its series that profiled the corrosive effects of drug corruption in Mexico. Ms. Preston came to The Times in July 1995 after working at the Washington Post for nine years as a foreign correspondent. She is a 1997 recipient of the Maria Moors Cabot Prize for distinguished coverage of Latin America and a 1994 winner of the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Humanitarian Journalism.

Born in Lake Forest, Ill., on May 29, 1951, Ms. Preston received a B.A. degree in Latin American Studies from Yale University in 1976. She speaks fluent Spanish and Portuguese. She has one daughter.

CINDY’S STORY

What does being in the “back of the line” mean for today’s undocumented immigrants? We speak to DREAMer Cindy about her opinion on both the Senate and the President’s proposal and her feelings on how effective either proposal would be.

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Click here to download this week’s show. [Photo courtesy of Flickr.]

 

 

THE AGENDA OF THE LAMB

Evangelicals are emerging as a growing force among Latinos in the U.S. One person, in particular, is often cited as a leader of the movement –  the Reverend Samuel Rodriguez. In late January, Rodriguez became the first Latino ever to give the keynote address at the Martin Luther King Jr. commemoration in Atlanta. Latino USA’s Andres Caballero has a profile of the charismatic minister from Sacramento.

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Click here to download this week’s show.

Andrés Caballero has been an active contributor to Latino USA for more than a year. He holds a M.S. in Journalism from the Columbia University School of Journalism, and a B.S. in Political Science from Notre Dame De Namur University. He covers issues that affect Latinos across the U.S., and he has also contributed to New America Media, the Hispanic Link News Service in Washington D.C., and El Tecolote in San Francisco.

NOTICIANDO: DEADLY SOUTH TEXAS

With border enforcement front and center in both immigration reform proposals, security and migration issues are stepping into the limelight. The Washington Office on Latin America found that South Texas was different from other border regions. Senior Associate for Regional Security at WOLA Adam Isacson explains the findings—and reveals the sometimes deadly truths.

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Click here to download this week’s show.

Adam Isacson is a key member of WOLA’s Regional Security Policy team. He is a leading expert on defense, civil-military relations, and U.S. security assistance to the Americas. He collaborates on Just the Facts—a constantly updated source of information and analysis of the United States’ often troubled relationship with Latin America’s militaries. He helped found Just the Facts in the early 1990s.

Mr. Isacson has co-authored dozens of publications, including “Ready, Aim, Foreign Policy” and “Waiting for Change,” which examine the increasing role of the military in U.S. foreign policy. He has testified before Congress on international drug policy, Colombia’s conflict, U.S. military aid programs and human rights, and has organized several congressional delegations to the region.