Latino USA

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This Week’s Captions: Targeted

Are Latinos the new hot target market? We’ll explore this idea on this episode of Latino USA. We meet a group trying to encourage Latinos to get outdoors. We’ll talk about the biggest news story the U.S. media’s not covering and much more.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

 

#1445 – Birth and Re-birth

What does it mean to create? Or to re-create oneself? Latino USA takes a look at issues of birth and re-invention, as well as emerging ideas and film in this episode.

Infant mortality in Rochester, New York

Rochester is a beautiful city in upstate New York. It’s also a place with a startling and sad statistic. It has one of the highest infant mortality rates in the country.

Infant mortality is when a baby dies before it reaches the age of one.

The U.S. infant mortality rate is about 6 per 1000 live births. So for every 1000 babies born, about 6 die before they turn one.

In Rochester, that rate is over 11 per 1000 live births.

But this doesn’t tell the whole story. To really understand, you have to break it down by race. Rochester’s black and Latino babies sometimes die at three or almost four times the rate of Rochester’s white babies.

Latino USA host and executive producer Maria Hinojosa visits Rochester to find out why this is happening. And to meet who is trying to change it.

Esmeralda Santiago relearns how to read

Esmeralda Santiago is a highly acclaimed author. Her novel When I was Puerto Rican was just named one of the 15 essential books by Latino authors in America. So when she experienced a stroke six years ago and found herself unable to read or write – it was devastating.

Then she realized that she had gone through this experience, in a way, before. When she moved to New York City from Puerto Rico, at 13 years old, she spoke no English. If she could learn a new language then, she would be able to learn again.

Esmeralda tells us how it felt when she experienced the stroke and how she was able to reclaim written language.

 

Photo vai Robert Curtis / CANTOMEDIA

 

Latinos, movies, and race – Oh my!

The push for the final films of 2014 is in full effect, and there are some films that are pushing the envelope while others are re-hashing old ideas with tired stereotypes.

Alejandro Gonzalez Iñarritú’s Birdman, whose central theme is re-birth as Michael Keaton plays a fictionalized version of himself trying to reclaim the glory of his superhero days. Then there’s Jorge Gutierrez’ Book of Life, produced by Guillermo del Toro, a hyper-stylized imagining of an entire Día de Muertos universe.

Then there are films dealing more explicitly with race, like Dear White People, a first outing for director Justin Simian about a group of black students at a mostly white Ivy League school. And then there’s Exodus, the Biblical epic from the epic-loving Ridley Scott, featuring an all-white cast playing Ancient Egyptians (led by Christian Bale as Moses and Joel Edgerton as Ramses II).

Maria sat down with film critic and podcaster Alonso Duralde about the films of the season.

 

AlonsoDuraldeAlonso Duralde is the author of 101 Must-See Movies for Gay Men (Advocate Books) and Have Yourself a Movie Little Christmas (Limelight Editions). He is the film critic for The Wrap/Reuters and has written about film for Movieline, Salon, MSNBC.com, and HitFix, among many other publications. He also co-hosts the Linoleum Knife podcast and regularly appears on What the Flick?! (The Young Turks Network).

How to measure change in the Catholic Church

The Latino population within the Church has been steadily declining: the number of U.S. Catholics who are Latino dropped from 67% to 55% from 2010 to 2014. The drop has been especially deep in younger, U.S. born Latinos, who largely drift away from the church and openly disagree with church doctrine on family issues and reproductive rights.

Some of those issues were addressed during last October’s Extraordinary Synod, a 10-day-long conference of 183 bishops from all over the world that took place at the Vatican, at the request of Pope Francis. The meeting was convened to discuss important issues involving families and the Catholic Church, including the use of birth control, Catholic divorce, cohabitation and outreach to gays and lesbians.

Though these issues were the subject of debate, Synods do not change doctrine. In fact, language calling for a more open approach to these issues didn’t make it into the final document after the Synod.

“None of those positions have changed, nor will they change” says Manny García-Tuñón, a spokesperson of the Catholic Association of Latino Leaders, an organization of that works closely with the clergy in the U.S. and is in line with Church doctrine on family issues. “The Holy Father was looking to gather synod fathers and others in the church to have a discussion to determine how we can better minister and be more inviting with its members that are in these circumstances.”

However, Hispanic Catholics’ views on these issues are in general very different than the Church’s line. According to Pew research, within just the Latino Catholic community here in the U.S., 72% favor the use of birth control, 64% favor allowing Catholic divorce, and 49% favor same-sex marriage (30% oppose same-sex marriage).

“If we want to keep the next generations within the Church and part of the Church and active in the Church, these questions are gonna need to be looked at in a realistic way,” says Dennis Coday, editor of the National Catholic Reporter, a publication that covers the Catholic Church independently.

“We recognize the trends and we recognize we need to do a better job,” says Garcia-Tuñón. “And I think to a large extent it’s precisely the kinds of actions that the Holy Father is doing to have discussions.”

Even though there was no fundamental shift on the issues, they were debated in a manner of openness and free dialogue not usually associated with Synods, but increasingly associated with Pope Francis.

Archbishop of Louisville, KY, Joseph Kurtz was present at the Synod. “I found that the process was very engaging,” he says. “I didn’t agree of course with every aspect that was raised. That was the whole purpose of us being able to be frank in raising things.”

A more welcoming approach, championed by Pope Francis, might actually work. A whopping 84% of Hispanic Catholics say they like Pope Francis according to Pew, and over half believe that he represents a major change for the Church.

Archbishop Kurtz says that the Church can’t win people over by changing the rules, but by changing the approach.

“Someone who wants to learn baseball doesn’t begin by opening up the rulebook,” says the Archbishop. “They go to a baseball game. And as they uncover the love of the game and are fascinated by it, then they begin to ask questions. ‘Well why do we do what we do? Why is there this rule or that rule?’”

On November 10, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops will meet to discuss, among other things, October’s Synod. You can watch a livestream of that even using this link, and the USCCB will be live-tweeting here.

FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/Getty Images

Boicot a Univisión: Puerto Ricans find a voice on social media

One place where trends, ideas, and even movements are born, and often die, is the internet. Remember the Kony 2012 campaign? Or the ALS ice bucket challenge? What seems like the most important issue one week can all of a sudden disappear into cyberland.

Well, one campaign fighting to stay relevant is boicot a Univisión or boycott Univision. Last October Univision fired over 100 employees in Puerto Rico and cancelled four local news programs.

Puerto Ricans were outraged. They were shocked that so many people lost their jobs and they felt that univision was sending the message that it didn’t care about Puerto Rico or journalism.

A recent post on the boycott Univision facebook page says: “Univision doesn’t believe in Puerto Rico. Puerto Ricans don’t count for anything according to Univision and you can tell just by looking at their programming.”

Three days after the layoffs, the boycott Univision page had over 30 thousand likes. Maria sits down with Julio Ricardo Varela of Latino Rebels to talk about whether the boycott Univision campaign will have an impact and how Puerto Ricans use the internet.

 

Varela_Julio_Ricardo

Julio Ricardo Varela is a pioneer in digital media and Founder of Latino Rebels, a collective of like-minded friends since 2011 dedicated to honest commentary about US Latinos. Today the site is a required destination for followers of Latino media. Recently, Julio was Digital Producer for Al Jazeera America’s “The Stream,” an award-wining community-driven news program. He also wrote regularly for NBC Latino, becoming the site’s top opinion writer. A Harvard graduate and native of Puerto Rico (and El Bronx), Julio and the Rebeldes have been featured in several outlets, including The New York Times, NPR, Le Monde, Face the Nation, Fusion, Univision and Telemundo. He calls Boston home.

Full disclosure: Julio is a friend of the show and has worked on social media outreach for our company Futuro Media Group’s television series America By the Numbers with Maria Hinojosa

Sabiduría: A Doula’s Wisdom

With her energetic and knowledgeable vibe, Annette Perel will walk us through different experiences she has had being a doula including, home births, hospital births and even births with other children around the room.

This professional helps the mother, the partner and the entire family, to receive the baby in the best way possible. With a mix of wisdom, training, natural therapies and woman intuition doulas really make a difference and help deliver babies with less suffering. They are also responsible for lowering the Caesarean section rates in the U.S. and speeding up the bonding and breast feeding process between the mother and the infant.

 

Annette2

Annette Perel was born in New York and spent her youth in Panama, where her parents are from originally. She has been a doula for 12 years and has attended more than 1000 births. Perel is a DONA international certified birth doula and trained postpartum doula and is also the cofounder of Clearbirth.com. Growing up bilingual in two different cultures, New York and Panama, Annette draws from a time-honored tradition in which supporting women is an integral part of community life. She has a respect for and interest in exploring different parenting styles and traditions and she is also Danny’s mom, a boy born in 2005.

 

 

 

PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images

 

 

This Week’s Music: Birth and Re-birth

-Sinfonia Agridulce by Mexican Institute of Sound

-Trigger by Maluca

-Invaders by Tentacles

-Tu Loco Loco y Yo Tranquilo (Roberto Roena Cover) by Buscabulla

-Ese Hombre Es El Che Guevara by Alberto Iglesias 

-Landscape by Alberto Iglesias 

-Crosses by Jose González

-The Body Breaks by Devendra Banhart

-Won’t You Come Over by Devendra Banhart

-Para Arriba by Jacinto de Yeah

-El Pescador by Banda Magda

-Mentalidad Televisiva by Los Prisioneros

-Me Vieron Cruzar by Calle 13

-Cuna De Vida by Making Movies

-Moviembre (El Bigote) Instr. by G-Flux

This Week’s Captions: Birth and Re-birth

What does it mean to create? Or to re-create oneself? Latino USA takes a look at issues of birth, re-invention, as well as emerging ideas and film in this episode.

 

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

 

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