Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Archives’ Category

Street Life…In 1993

In this special archive edition, we hear three essays from a friend of Latino USA. Former gang member John Guardo takes us through his escape from violence and drugs, and reflects on his experience as a Colombian immigrant.

Photo from Latino USA archives.

Remembering Cesar Chavez (1993)

This special piece remembers activist and Latino civil rights icon Cesar Chavez, and includes him in his own words. Originally aired May 1993.

Photo courtesy flickr.

The Queen of Tejano Music (1995)

Selena Quintanilla Perez was the queen of Tejano music. In this piece from 1995, Latino USA’s Maria Martin brings us the voices of those whose lives she touched through her music. Originally aired April 1995.

Photo courtesy flickr.

This Week’s Captions: ARCHIVES: RECOVERY EFFORTS

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

In this special archive episode, we hear about how Latinos recovered and helped their communities after two disasters—the September 11th terrorist attacks and Hurricane Katrina. Also, a report on the need for more Spanish-language coaches and reporters in Major League Baseball, and two Cubans in Miami plot a return home in an unusual vehicle.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

9/11: Undocumented and Uncounted (2001)

At the time of the September 11th, 2001 attacks, undocumented immigrants formed an integral part of life in and around the World Trade Center. In this story from the Latino USA archives, Michelle Garcia reports on how the attacks and their aftermath challenged them.

Katrina One Year Later (2006)

In this 2006 archive story from Waveland, Mississippi, Rolando Arrieta reports on how immigrant workers helped rebuild homes, schools, and hospitals in the year after Hurricane Katrina.

Latinos in Baseball (1998)

Latin Americans love baseball. But in this piece from 1998, we hear about the problems faced by Spanish-speakers when major league players arrive from abroad.

Chevy Boat Cubans (2007)

In this 2007 story, we hear the story of how two Cubans in Miami plan to return home in an unusual vehicle.

This Week’s Captions: ARCHIVES: PRESIDENTIAL EDITION

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

In this special look back at twenty years of Latino USA, we hear interviews with four of the show’s most prominent guests. President Clinton calls for a dialogue on race in 1993. Barack Obama, still a senator in 2006, talks immigration reform. In a 1997 interview, author Junot Diaz talks about representing the Dominican Republic and New Jersey. And comedian George Lopez talks about his sitcom, which debuted in 2003, featuring a Latino family.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

George Lopez (2003)

Maria Hinojosa talks with comedian George Lopez, who in 2003 had just launched his sitcom The George Lopez Show. It was the first show to feature a Latino family, and in its own way, fought stereotypes and showcased Latino diversity.

Image courtesy of HBO

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CAPTIONS

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