Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Arts’ Category

This Week’s Captions: LA LUCHA

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This edition of Latino USA is all about “la lucha”-the fight or struggle-from the ongoing efforts of business leaders and activists to reform immigration policy to songwriter Robi Draco Rosa’s fight against cancer. Also: fights on cable news, one Spanish-language newspaper that’s fought for a hundred years for Latinos, a small town’s struggle for clean water, and words of wisdom from a Mexican wrestler.

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Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Draco Rosa: Lucha y Vida

Maria Hinojosa talks to musician Robi Draco Rosa about his fight against cancer, his life as a former child performer, and his latest album “Vida,” which features performers like Ricky Martin and Shakira. The former Menudo heartthrob gives insight into his view on life’s struggles and how they are reflected in his art. He is now launching his first tour since his illness.

Photo courtesy Digital Girl Inc.

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Draco Rosa (born June 27, 1969), also known as Robi Draco Rosa and Robby Rosa, is a Puerto Rican Grammy Award winning musician, dancer, singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, record producer and actor. Born as Robert Edward Rosa Suárez on Long Island, New York and raised in Ponce, Puerto Rico, he originally garnered fame as a member of boy band Menudo in the 1980s. As co-writer and co-producer of many of Ricky Martin’s hits in English and in Spanish, he created the framework for the revolution in bilingual music careers that continue to dominate the charts to the present day. His latest album, Vida, is truly a celebration of life. He recorded it after he announced in 2011 that he had been diagnosed with cancer.

This Week’s Captions: Questions of Authority

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week’s Latino USA examines’ questions of authority: who abuses it? How do you get it? And how do you maintain it? We’ll hear the stories of veterans and law enforcement. We’ll hear from a New York councilman from community asserting its power, discuss authority in media with students, a professor, and Univision anchor Jorge Ramos. And we’ll hear from two authorities in acting, Eugenio Derbez and Rita Moreno.

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Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Big Screen Crossover: Eugenio Derbez

Conventional wisdom says that Spanish-language movies don’t do well in the United States. But Mexican actor Eugenio Derbez set his sights north of the border, and his movie “Instructions Not Included” had the biggest opening weekend a Spanish-language movie has ever had. He joins Latino USA to talk about his crossover project.

Photo courtesy Pantelion Films

B3Eugenio_headshot_wikicommonsEugenio Derbez is arguably the most popular Mexican comedic actor of his generation. Due to his incredible ability to transform himself into any character, and to his extensive career in television, film and theatre, Much of his popularity is due to his television programs Al Derecho y al Derbez, XH-DRBZ, Vecinos, La Alegría del Hogar and La Familia P. Luche, which have had many of the highest audience ratings.In recent years, his outstanding career and his enormous ability as an actor have paved his way into the American film industry, allowing him to work alongside renowned actors such as Adam Sandler, Katie Holmes and Al Pacino, among others.

“Instructions Not Included” is his cinematic directorial debut.

 

 

 

A Rita in Spanish Harlem

Actress Rita Moreno and her fans send Latino USA an audio postcard from her book signing at La Casa Azul Bookstore in New York City’s “El Barrio” neighborhood.

 

*Correction: In this piece, Rita Moreno says that Raul Julia won an Oscar. Julia did not win an Oscar. Benicio del Toro did for “Traffic”, making him the third Puerto Rican actor to win the award. Julia was nominated for several awards and won the Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild awards, as well as the Emmy.

This Week’s Captions: LATINA ARTISTS

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

In our final archive special for the month of August, we hear from three Latinas about their lives and creativity. Actress Salma Hayek talks to Maria Hinojosa about playing artist Frida Kahlo. Actress Rosie Perez discusses her Brooklyn roots and rise to fame. And we hear from Julieta Venegas about her influences and early career. Finally, a piece from 1993 asks that perpetual question: how do you identify yourself?

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Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Salma Hayek: On Being Frida Kahlo (2002)

Maria Hinojosa talks risk-taking and filmmaking with actress Salma Hayek in this interview from 2002.

Photo courtesy of Miramax.

Rosie Perez: Rising To Fame (1993)

In 1993, actress Rosie Perez was a rising Latina star. Reporter Mandalit del Barco brought us this profile of her rise to stardom from humble Brooklyn roots.

Photo courtesy of Warner Bros Pictures.

Julieta Venegas: Bueninvento (2000)

In her own words, musician Julieta Venegas tells us about her influences and her early career, around the time of her second release, “Bueninvento” in 2000.

Photo courtesy of Flickr

This Week’s Captions: Memories of friends and icons

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

In this special archive edition of Latino USA, we hear three essays from former gang member turned NPR producer John Guardo, about his escape from gang life and experience as an immigrant. Then, we remember civil rights icon Cesar Chavez, and Selena, the queen of Tejano music.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

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