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Archive for the ‘Arts’ Category

Julieta Venegas: Bueninvento (2000)

In her own words, musician Julieta Venegas tells us about her influences and her early career, around the time of her second release, “Bueninvento” in 2000.

Photo courtesy of Flickr

The Queen of Tejano Music (1995)

Selena Quintanilla Perez was the queen of Tejano music. In this piece from 1995, Latino USA’s Maria Martin brings us the voices of those whose lives she touched through her music. Originally aired April 1995.

Photo courtesy flickr.

Os Mutantes

Host Maria Hinojosa talks with Sergio Dias, leader of influential tropicalia band Os Mutantes, about life in Las Vegas and their new album, Fool Metal Jack.

Image courtesy of Clarissa Lambert

Sergent Garcia

Genre-bending global musician Sergent Garcia talks with Host Maria Hinojosa about blending cumbia, reggae, and salsa for a danceable mix.

Image courtesy of Facebook


We continue our series on the role of the accordion with a look at the bandoneon, the main instrument used in tango music, which is turning up in some unexpected places.

michellesheadshotMichelle Johnson is a multimedia journalist who lives in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. When she is not working, you are likely to find her out with the dog, talking to strangers and collecting stories.

Xenia Rubinos

Singer-songwriter Xenia Rubinos shares her thoughts about her latest album, Magic Trix, and how race impacts her music.

Image courtesy of Shervin Lainez

Nadia Reiman has been a radio producer since 2005. Before joining the Latino USA team, Nadia produced for StoryCorps for almost five years. Her work there on 9/11 stories earned her a Peabody Award. She has also mixed audio for animations, assisted on podcasts for magazines, and program managed translations for Canon Latin America. Nadia has also produced for None on Record editing and mixing stories of queer Africans, and worked on a Spanish language radio show called Epicentro based out of Washington DC. She graduated from Kenyon College with a double major in International Studies and Spanish Literature.

¡A bailar! at the LAMC

Latino USA returns to the Latin Alternative Music conference, a showcase of the latest and greatest tunes from across Latin America. Guest host Nadia Reiman digs through the best new music and talks to both new artists and veterans about what advice they could use, what advice they can give, and why Chile is going through a pop renaissance.

Image courtesy of Karlo Ramos.

Click photo below to scroll through the gallery of Nadia and producer Michael Johnson’s photos from LAMC:

[nggallery id=3]


How should one view the US/Mexico border? Guest host Carolina Gonzalez talks to film director Rodrigo Reyes about his vision in his new documentary, Purgatorio.


Born in Mexico City in 1983, Rodrigo Reyes attended college in UC San Diego, as well as Madrid and Mexico City, earning degree in International Studies. Instead of following this career path, Reyes channeled his multi-cultural background in to becoming a filmmaker. Reyes has directed several documentaries exploring Mexico, including the experimental narrative Memories of the Future. In 2012, he was selected to the prestigious IFP Filmmaker Labs with his latest documentary Purgatorio. In 2013 this film premiered at the Guadalajara IFF as well as Los Angeles Film Festival to great reviews.

Charrito de Oro

Ten-year-old Sebastian de la Cruz got a dream gig singing the U.S national anthem “Mariachi style” during this year’s NBA finals. But after his performance, a wave of bigoted remarks soon followed. Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa cheers on the little “Charro” for turning negativity into a chance to showcase his pride.

Check out el Charrito sing at Game 4 of the NBA finals.


Latino USA takes a minute to remember Arturo Vega, the Mexican immigrant and “Fifth Ramone,” who designed the iconic logo for the classic New York punk band. He died earlier this month at 65 years of age.

Photo courtesy of



Rhyming for Democracy

Destiny Galindo is a 17-year-old rapper who may not be able to vote, but believes in the power of the people all the same. The Arizona teenager was just awarded a $25,000 prize in the Looking@Democracy challenge sponsored by The MacArthur Foundation.

Image courtesy of Destiny Galindo, “American Vision”.


Destiny Galindo is a 17-year-old Mexican-American rapper hailing from Phoenix, Arizona. She graduated high school this year, and was just awarded a $25,000 prize in the Looking@Democracy challenge sponsored by The MacArthur Foundation for her music video “American Vision”.

Bajofondo? “Presente!”

If you’ve seen Babel, Motorcycle Diaries, or Brokeback Mountain you’ve heard the music of producer and film score composer Gustavo Santaolalla.  This time around, his most recent work comes with Argentine-Uruguayan electro-tango group Bajofondo. María Hinojosa speaks to Santaolalla about their newest record, “Presente.”
Photo courtesy of BajofondoMusic.Com.


Click below for an extended version of Maria’s interview with Gustavo Santaollala:


GustavoGustavo Santaolalla is a composer, producer, guitarist, and he directs a record label and a publishing company. His production career started with Argentine singer Leon Gieco in 1973. He continued to work on albums by G.I.T. and Divididos (La Era de la Boludez), and later with Mexican bands like Maldita Vecindad and Café Tacuba. His work as a film score composer began with his contribution to the soundtrack for “The Insider.” He later worked on “Amores Perros”, “21 Grams”, “Motorcycle Diaries”, “Brokeback Mountain”, and “Babel”.

The “Six” Amigos

Venezuelan band Los Amigos Invisibles bring their fusion jazz and Latino funk to liven up the party. María Hinojosa speaks with guitarist, singer, and D.J Jose Luis Pardo, aka Cheo, about their newest album, “Repeat After Me.”
Album cover courtesy of Los Amigos Invisibles.

Screen Shot 2013-05-31 at 12.45.18 PMJose Luis Pardo, aka Cheo, or “DJ Afro” is the guitarist and singer of Los Amigos Invisibles; he is also a producer and editor.

Vallenato Fever

As part of our accordion series, we hear vallenato, a Colombian style mix of African, European and indigenous sounds. Julie Caine reports on Los Angeles based Very Be careful, one of the U.S bands that’s bringing vallenato back to life.

Photo courtesy of Very Be Careful Facebook.

sound-226x300Julie Caine is a photographer by background, a filmmaker by training, and a radio producer by passion.

Spitting in Spanglish

From the Mecca of Mexican hip-hop, 27-year-old rapper Carla Reyna, aka Niña Dioz, talks about hip-hop, race, and her new album, “Indestructible.”
Photo Courtesy of Niña Dioz Facebook.

Screen Shot 2013-05-31 at 1.34.13 PMCarla Reyna, better known by her MC name Niña Dioz, emerged from the underground hip-hop scene in Monterrey, Mexico. After years of making a name for herself in Mexico and internationally on the hip-hop festival circuit, she has finally released her first full-length album, “Indestructible,” a collection of Spanglish rhymes and high-energy beats.


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