Archive for the ‘Arts’ Category

FROM TIGRES TO TIGRILLOS: RAUL Y MEXIA

New brotherly duo Raul y Mexia debuted their first album, Arriba y Lejos. But the siblings are no strangers to the music scene. We speak to them about their new album and about growing up as the sons of Norteño giants Los Tigres del Norte.


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Raul Hernandez and Hernan Hernandez Jr (Raul y Mexia) are musicians and the sons of Hernan Hernandez of Los Tigres del Norte. They first burst into the music scene with a video they made for Todos Somos Arizona in which they spoke out against Arizona’s SB 1070. Their first album, Arriba y Lejos just debuted on Nacional Records. Photo courtesy of Vivelo Hoy. More info here.

PICTURE PERFECT BRONX

A group of Nuyorican photographers from the South Bronx has a new photo exhibit on display. The group calls itself “Los Seis del Sur”…six from the South. They chronicled everyday life in their neighborhoods during the late ‘70s and early ‘80s, when crime, drugs and arson were ravaging the Bronx. The six were just young men at the time, but they created a photographic history that no outsiders could rival. Lily Jamali reports.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image by Lily Jamali.

Lily Jamali is a New York-based journalist who reports across the platforms of television, radio, and the web. Her work has taken her around the world to Europe, Asia, and Latin America and has been featured on NBC, CNN, PRI/BBC’s “The World”, and the CBC. Follow her on Twitter: @lilyjamali

NOTICIANDO: SUNDANCE, LATINO STYLE

We take a closer look on what’s Latino in this year’s Sundance Film Festival, which takes place this month in Park City, Utah. We talk to Sundance Festival Senior Programmer Shari Frilot, and to blogger, film critic and Sundance programming associate Christine Davila.


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Christine Dávila is a first generation Mexican-American born and raised in Chicago. Her passion for discovering original and underrepresented voices led her to pursue a career in film festival programming.  She started to screen films for the 2008 Sundance Film Festival where she is currently a Programming Associate, and also evaluates projects for Sundance Institute’s International Screenwriters lab.  Davila has also been an Associate Programmer for The San Francisco International Film Festival, Los Angeles Film Festival, and the Morelia International Film Festival.  She programs a monthly screening series in LA’s Downtown Independent theater.  A regular volunteer at Centro Del Pueblo, a non-profit community service center for at risk youth in Echo Park, she also writes, not as frequently as she’d like to, on her blog, http://chicanafromchicago.com a forum where she tracks, interviews and covers US Latino films and filmmakers.

 

 

An alumna of Harvard/Radcliffe University, and the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program, Shari Frilot is a filmmaker who has produced television for the CBS affiliate in Boston and for WNYC and WNET in New York before creating her own independent award-winning films, including Strange & Charmed, A Cosmic Demonstration of Sexuality, What Is A Line? and the feature documentary, Black Nations/Queer Nations? She is the recipient of multiple grants, including the Ford Foundation and the Rockefeller Media Arts Foundation.

Shari is presently the Senior Programmer for the Sundance Film Festival. She is the curator and driving creative force behind New Frontier, an exhibition and commissioning initiative that focuses on cinematic work being created at the intersections of art, film and new media technology.

CUBAN HIP HOP

While the hip hop movement in Cuba has been developing for many years, women rappers have struggled to make inroads. One of the few to break through has been Telmary Diaz. Though she now lives outside of the island, her music focuses on her experiences as a Cuban woman.


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Telmary Diaz, better known as Telmary, is an award-winning Toronto-based Cuban rapper, musician, and spoken-word artist. In 2007 she released her first solo album A Diario to rave reviews. She made her film debut in “Todas las noches terminan en el Malecon” by Cecilia Araujo (Brazil 2001), and her feature debut in “Musica Cubana” by German Krall (2004). She has also worked to the 2005 Spanish film “Habana Blues” by Benito Zambrano, and contributed the soundtrack of the 2002 Italian film “MalaHabana” by Guido Giansoldatti.

REVIEWING THE CENTRAL PARK FIVE

Host Maria Hinojosa speaks with Newsday film critic Rafer Guzman about The Central Park Five, a new documentary by Ken Burns and his daughter Sarah Burns about a 1989 case where five young men were convicted of the brutal rape of a jogger. This case became a lightning rod about youth of color and violence in New York and in the nation.


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Rafer Guzman is the film critic for Newsday. He is also a contributing critic to WNYC’s “The Takeaway” and co-host of the podcast “Movie Date.”

 



LIFE AFTER CENTRAL PARK

Yusef Salaam, one of the exonerated teens convicted of rape in the Central Park jogger case, talks about life after prison and about watching himself on screen in the film The Central Park Five.


Click here to download this week’s show. Photo courtesy of Maysles Institute.

Yusef Salaam was born and raised in New York City. He attended Public School 83, Manhattan East, The Arts Student League of New York and studied art at LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and jewelry making at the Fashion Institute of Technology. On April 19, 1989, at just 15 years of age, he learned that he, along with other young boys were being falsely arrested for rape. Yusef Salaam served approximately 7 years of his life in prison along with 3 years on parole. Now a proud father, Yusef advocates for education, the need for videotaping of all police interrogations, for policy change in the child welfare system & the prison industrial complex, the effects of the disenfranchisement of poor people and its overwhelming effects on their families and the entire community at large. He sits on the Board of the Campaign to End the Death Penalty, the advisory Board for The Learn My History Foundation: dedicated to Youth Empowerment, Education and Change, and is the inspiration behind People United for Children.

MEET THE MAMBONIKS

Back in the 1950s, when the mambo was the rage, some of its biggest fans were Jewish. Reporter Marlon Bishop brings us this story of a community still keeping the beat after all these years.


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Marlon is a radio producer, writer, and reporter based in New York. His work is focused on music, Latin America, New York City and the arts, and has appeared in several public radio outlets such as WNYC News, Studio 360, The World and NPR News. He is an Associate Producer at Afropop Worldwide and a staff writer for MTV Iggy.

 

 

 

Check out these tunes by many other Mambonicks:

Iriving Fields, “Miami Beach Rhumba” (1947)

Pianist Irving Fields grew up acting on the Yiddish stage in 1920s Jewish Brooklyn, and became a major performer on the Catskills circuit. As a young performer, he hopped a cruise ship to pre-revolutionary Cuba and returned determined to bring Latin music into his act. His first big hit was 1947’s “Miami Beach Rhumba,” which was covered by bandleaders like Xavier Cugat and Tito Puente. Fields went on to produce “Bagels and Bongos,” mixing Latin rhythms with Yiddish standards.

Alfredito Levy, “Goofus Mambo” (1953)

Al “Alfredito” Levy was the first significant Jewish mambo bandleader in New York City. He began as a percussionist gigging with bands like Joe Quijano and Tito Puente, and eventually came to lead his own orchestra, putting out novelty mambo hits like the “Chinese Cha Cha Cha,” the “Crazy Stalin Mambo,” and the “Goofus Mambo.”

Juan Calle and his Latin Lantzmen, “Bublitchi Baigelach” (1961)

In a nod to the Jewish-Mambo connection, Latin stars Ray Baretto, Charlie Palmieri and Willie Rodriguez teamed up with top jazz players to put out a peculiar album titled “Mazel Tov Mis Amigos” under the name Juan Calle and his Latin Lantzmen, an imaginary Latin-Jewish supergroup. The album mixes Yiddish tunes with Latin Jazz — and serious instrumental chops from the all-star lineup.

Larry Harlow, “Arsenio” (1971)

Bandleader Larry Harlow is the Brooklyn-born Mambonik who took his Latin music obsession the farthest, eventually becoming one of the principal salsa bandleaders of the 1970s on the Fania label, nicknamed “El Judio Maravilloso” (“The Marvelous Jew”). Harlow (who is also a converted santeria priest) didn’t often address Jewish themes in his music however. One of his hits was “Arsenio,” a tribute to Cuban innovator Arsenio Rodriguez.

NOTICIANDO: HARVEST OF EMPIRE

Why do immigrants come to the United States? Most people’s first thoughts involve economic reasons for a better life. But there is more to it than that. Harvest of Empire, a book by Juan Gonzalez that has been turned into a documentary, addresses the military, political and economic interventions that have spurred immigrants to look to life in the U.S. We speak to co-producer Wendy Thompson Marquez for an overview of the documentary.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Here is the full documentary, Harvest of Empire.

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Ms. Wendy Thompson-Marquez, is the President and CEO of the Onyx Media Group and EVS communications, Inc. Prior to joining EVS and the Onyx Media Group, she was the Vice President of ZGS Broadcast Holdings, a minority-owned communications company where she supervised the daily operations and advertising sales of eleven Telemundo network affiliates.
In 2004, she was honored by the National Conference for Community and Justice with the Media and Community Service Award. She has been featured in numerous newspaper and trade publications, including the Washington Business Journal, and has made several appearances on television and radio stations throughout the country. In addition, she is actively involved with a number of academic institutions in the Washington, D.C. area that have invited her to speak at student and faculty conferences, including Montgomery College, where she was the 2002 commencement speaker.

She is currently a board member of Latino Public broadcasting, the Washington Performing Arts Society and the Community Foundation in D.C. she is a graduate of Leadership Montgomery (2000), and Leadership Washington (2001).

CARIBBEAN CROSSROADS

The exhibit “Caribbean: Crossroads of the World” explores the complexities of art from the entire Caribbean region in an ambitious threemuseum collaboration in New York City with over 500 works spanning 400 years. Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa toured the Queens Museum site with lead curator Elvis Fuentes.


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Planet New Mexico

Writer and musician Raquel Z. Rivera a New York native, tells us about making a home in a new and radically different place: the desert in the outskirts of Alburquerque. A place she calls “Planet New Mexico.”

RadioNature is a year-long series that looks at how people of color connect with nature. Funding comes from the REI Foundation.


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Raquel Z. Rivera, Ph.D. is an author, scholar and singer-songwriter. She is co-editor of the anthology Reggaeton (2009) and author of New York Ricans from the Hip Hop Zone (2003). She blogs about her creative process at Cascabel de Cobre and about reggaeton and hip-hop at reggaetonica. A singer-songwriter, her debut CD Las 7 salves de La Magdalena / 7 Songs of Praise for the Magdalene was released in 2011. She has worked with the bomba group Alma Moyo, the Boricua roots music group Yerbabuena and Yaya, an all-women’s musical collective dedicated to Dominican salves and Puerto Rican bomba. She was born and raised in Puerto Rico and now lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

 

 

 

 

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Soaring Skies

Jose Sainz, a master kite maker and flyer from San Diego talks to Jocelyn Frank about his fascination with the majesty and power of the wind.

RadioNature is a year-long series that looks at how people of color connect with nature. Funding comes from the REI Foundation.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Jocelyn Frank is an independent radio journalist, sound artist and musician. She’s produced and reported internationally for NPR and BBC Radio 4 and helped to develop and launch the successful UK-facing BBC Radio program Americana. She’s the creative director of Voices of Health; an audio project that documents the stories of DC residents living with HIV and AIDS. Voices of Health can be heard online and through listening stations installed in public spaces across the District of Columbia.

 

 

Here’s a video of Jose flying his kites:

 

 

 

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SOMOS: HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH

Hispanic Heritage Month, Sept. 15-Oct. 15, is supposed to be a time to celebrate Latino contributions to U.S. society and culture. But for some, it feels like a way to sanitize Latino history in the U.S. Or worse, just another excuse to market to Latinos. Host Maria Hinojosa speaks with Prof. Arlene Dávila and humorist Lalo Alcaraz about the uses and meanings of Hispanic Heritage Month.

This is part of our series on Latino identity, “Somos.”


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Lalo Alcaraz is the creator of the first nationally-syndicated, politically-themed Latino daily comic strip, “La Cucaracha,” seen in scores of newspapers including the Los Angeles Times. He is also co-host of KPFK Radio’s popular satirical talk show, “The Pocho Hour of Power,” and co-founded the political satire comedy group Chicano Secret Service. His work has appeared in major publications around the world and he has won numerous awards and honors. Alcaraz received his Bachelor’s degree from San Diego State University, and earned his master’s degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a faculty member at Otis College of Art & Design in Los Angeles. Alcaraz was born in San Diego and grew up on the border. He is married to a hard-working public school teacher and they have three extremely artistic children.

 

Arlene Davila is a professor of Anthropology, Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. She is the author of Sponsored Identities: Cultural Politics in Puerto Rico and Latinos Inc: Marketing and the Making of a People, Barrio Dreams: Puerto Ricans, Latinos and the Neoliberal City. Her book, Latino Spin: Public Image and the Whitewashing of Race recently received the Latin American Studies Association prize for the best book in Latino studies.

LOS BROS

Comic book superheroes may rule movie screens recently, but two Chicanos from Southern California have used comics to tell amazing stories about ordinary people for the past 30 years. We meet Jaime and Gilbert Hernandez, godfathers of the alternative comics movement and creators of Love and Rockets. Latino USA’s senior producer Carolina Gonzalez reports.


Click here to download this week’s show. Love and Rockets, Copyright 2012, Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez. Photo courtesy of Fantagraphics.

Diaz On Hernandez/Hernandez on Diaz

Dominican-American author Junot Díaz’s work often references Love & Rockets. And Jaime Hernandez has illustrated four Díaz stories published in The New Yorker magazine. So we decided to ask Díaz about the influence Los Bros. have had on his storytelling, and asked Jaime about translating Diaz’s obsessions into images. Check out what they said here:

But wait! There’s more…check out this exclusive cover art slide show below:

Carolina Gonzalez is an award-winning journalist and scholar with over two decades of experience in print and radio. She served as an editorial writer at the New York Daily News, and has covered education, immigration, politics, music and Latino culture in various alternative and mainstream media outlets, such as WNYC radio, AARP Segunda Juventud, SF Weekly and the Progressive Media Project. The guidebook she co-authored with Seth Kugel, Nueva York: the Complete Guide to Latino Life in the Five Boroughs, was published in 2006 by St. Martin’s Press. She was raised in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, and Queens, New York and lives in Brooklyn, New York.

NOTICIANDO: VOCES

Mexican American women train to compete in Mexico’s Charro contest, raw poetry emerges from the Brooklyn projects, modernist architecture in Cuba, and an inside look at the masked men of Mexico’s Lucha Libre. These are documentary subjects on VOCES, a Latino arts and documentary showcase on public television. We speak to Sandie Pedlow, executive director of Latino Public Broadcasting.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Sandie Viquez Pedlow is the Executive Director of Latino Public broadcasting overseeing the development, production, and distribution of public media content that is representative of Latino people or address issues concerning Latino Americans. She brings to this position over 20 years experience in program development, production, and the development of international public media initiatives. Most recently she was Director, Station Relations for PBS Education where she led the implementation and marketing of PBS online and digital media products and services. Prior to PBS, Pedlow was Director of Programming Strategies, Associate Director of Cultural, Drama and Arts Programming, and Senior Program Officer with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting for 10 years. She managed the development and funding of national public broadcasting programs which addressed social and diversity issues, history, the arts and many aspects of American culture. Pedlow was a key member of the CPB team that managed the founding of LPB. Prior to this work, Pedlow developed and produced documentaries, cultural/arts television programs for SCETV and was the U.S. National Coordinator for INPUT, an international public television conference with more than 35 participating

MIS GETS POLITICO

Former record-exec-turned-musician Camilo Lara, aka Mexican Institute of Sound, talks to us about the inspiration behind his new album, Político, about sonidero and about his sonic legacy.


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Mexican Institute of Sound (MIS; or Instituto Mexicano Del Sonido) is an electronic music project created by Mexico City-based DJ and producer Camilo Lara. Lara is the former president of EMI Mexico. He is part of a growing Mexican electronica movement, encouraging fusions of folk and more traditional music with modern sounds.

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