Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Award Winners’ Category

THE NEW ADVENTURES OF SANDRA AND MARIE

Maria Hinojosa interviews prolific author Sandra Cisneros about her new book, Have You Seen Marie?, and about her struggles with depression.


Click here to download this week’s show. Bio image courtesy of Ray Santisteben.

Sandra Cisneros is the founder of the Alfredo Cisneros del Moral Foundation, the Elvira Cisneros Award and the Macondo Foundation, all of which work on behalf of creative writers. She is the recipient of numerous awards including a MacArthur. Her writings include novels: THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET and CARAMELO; short stories: WOMAN HOLLERING CREEK; and poetry collections: MY WICKED WICKED WAYS and LOOSE WOMAN and a children’s book, HAIRS. She is currently at work on several writing projects including TANGO FOR TONGELE, a book of essays, WRITING IN MY PAJAMAS, writing tips; HOW TO BE A CHINGONA, life tips; INFINITO, stories; CANTOS Y LLANTOS, poems. Her most recent books are a children’s book, BRAVO, BRUNO with artist Leslie Greene, to be published in Italy, and the forthcoming HAVE YOU SEEN MARIE?, an illustrated book for adults with artist Ester Hernández, to be published in the US in October,
2012.

SOMOS: HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH

Hispanic Heritage Month, Sept. 15-Oct. 15, is supposed to be a time to celebrate Latino contributions to U.S. society and culture. But for some, it feels like a way to sanitize Latino history in the U.S. Or worse, just another excuse to market to Latinos. Host Maria Hinojosa speaks with Prof. Arlene Dávila and humorist Lalo Alcaraz about the uses and meanings of Hispanic Heritage Month.

This is part of our series on Latino identity, “Somos.”


Click here to download this week’s show.

Lalo Alcaraz is the creator of the first nationally-syndicated, politically-themed Latino daily comic strip, “La Cucaracha,” seen in scores of newspapers including the Los Angeles Times. He is also co-host of KPFK Radio’s popular satirical talk show, “The Pocho Hour of Power,” and co-founded the political satire comedy group Chicano Secret Service. His work has appeared in major publications around the world and he has won numerous awards and honors. Alcaraz received his Bachelor’s degree from San Diego State University, and earned his master’s degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a faculty member at Otis College of Art & Design in Los Angeles. Alcaraz was born in San Diego and grew up on the border. He is married to a hard-working public school teacher and they have three extremely artistic children.

 

Arlene Davila is a professor of Anthropology, Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. She is the author of Sponsored Identities: Cultural Politics in Puerto Rico and Latinos Inc: Marketing and the Making of a People, Barrio Dreams: Puerto Ricans, Latinos and the Neoliberal City. Her book, Latino Spin: Public Image and the Whitewashing of Race recently received the Latin American Studies Association prize for the best book in Latino studies.

Undocumented and Unafraid: Jose Antonio Vargas

Jose Antonio Vargas is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist who at the peak of his career made a decision that shocked the media and politicians. He declared to the world through an essay in the New York Times Magazine: I am undocumented and I am not alone. He tells the story of what led to his decision and what it has meant for him.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Esperanza Spalding

Bassist and vocalist Esperanza Spalding became the first jazz musician to win the Grammy for Best New Artist this week. But long before she made headlines and stirred up Justin Bieber fans, Latino USA had been following her career. In 2008 when she released her first album Esperanza, Maria Hinojosa talked to Spalding about her inspirations and influences in her music. Her latest album is Chamber Music Society

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

American Dreamer: Sam’s Story

The American ethic that hard work and gumption are keys to success is one not lost on public education students. Stay in school, go to college, find a good job – all themes that educators press in school. But imagine that you do all that only to find that the rules actually don’t apply to you. That’s the plight of thousands of high school graduates every year.

By law, the public education system cannot turn away students based on immigration status. A free public education is available to all in this country. And children who were brought here by their immigrant parents often thrive in this system. But what happens after they leave high school? The best and brightest have no problem getting accepted into top universities. But that’s where their immigration status gets tricky.

Only a handful of states have passed legislation allowing undocumented children who graduate from public high schools to attend public colleges and universities at in-state tuition rates, some with student financial aid. For those lucky few, the opportunities end there. They cannot enter the U.S. job market legally, despite diplomas and degrees. The vast majority of undocumented students, however, have no access to student aid and must pay international student tuition rates. This has led to calls for supporting federal legislation commonly known as the DREAM Act. But despite public support for it, the legislation has become mired in national immigration politics.

Produced by The Futuro Media Group and Dan Collison and Elizabeth Meister of Long Haul Productions, the feature titled American Dreamer tells the story of an undocumented student trying to get a college education. A few weeks before graduation, Dan and Elizabeth met Sam, a highly Americanized high school kid who plays saxophone. Same never really worried about politics and immigration status, until now. This is his story.

 
 

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Sam recently traveled to New York to participate in a panel about the DREAM ACT. The event was hosted by The College Board. Because of his undocumented status, Sam could not get on an airplane and had to be driven. Here’s his audio postcard of that trip.

American Dreamer: Sam’s Story is the winner of the 2010 Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Audio Documentary, and the Radio Impact Award in the 2010 Third Coast International Audio Festival.

 

 

 

Web Extra: Danticat Awarded MacArthur ‘Genius’ Grant

Edwidge Danticat (Photo by David Shankbone)

The MacArthur Foundation announced 24 new grant recipients this week, commonly known as the “Genius Awards.” Among this years winners was Haitian immigrant and novelist Edwidge Danticat.

Listen to Maria Hinojosa’s April 2008 interview with Edwidge about the death of her beloved uncle while in custody of U.S. immigration officials and about her latest book, Brother I’m Dying.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

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