Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Captions’ Category

This Week’s Captions: Space

THIS WEEKS SHOW:
Space: it’s the final frontier, and our theme for this episode. From the vast area worked by the border patrol to the experience of those held in detention centers, Latino USA is there. Also: the space and time to ice fish is shrinking in Colorado. A man creates a Puerto Rican jungle in Holyoke, Massachusetts. A neighborhood in San Diego fights for its health. We hear about the cosmic role of Latin Americans, Latinos in space, and take a trip to space camp. And finally, the story of one man trying to create a place for Chicanos in American media.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: Music Lessons with Bill Cosby

THIS WEEKS SHOW:
It’s a special episode of Latino USA. The legendary Bill Cosby joins host Maria Hinojosa to talk about his love of salsa music and the musicians who made it. We learn about Tito Puente and other musicians who helped shape Latin jazz, and find out why calling the music “Salsa” might be all wrong in the first place. We reflect on how Mr. Cosby’s work welcomed Latinos and other immigrants to the American family. And we hear life lessons from a nearly 100-year-old Rumba player.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: Moms Drugs and Rock ‘n Roll

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:
Today on Latino USA, it’s all about Moms, drugs, and Rock & Roll. Maria Hinojosa talks to leading Latina mami bloggers about why they’re ruling the web. Then, we talk to YouTube sensation Jorge Narvaez about his mother, who is in deportation proceedings. In drug-related news, we hear about efforts to stop teen drug smuggling and how prescription drugs are being brought across the Mexico border. We also take a look at the future of pot. And we rock out with the Kumbia Queers before getting a little wisdom from Gabriel García Márquez.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: Fiction Edition

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:
First week of April, first ever fiction edition at Latino USA! We dream big this week with a story about our motherland, Latinia. And speaking of new nations, we tune in to newscast about a new country for LGBTQ people. We take a shot at our first ever radionovela (no-VEH-lah) – or Latin American-style radio soap opera. We dream immigration reform passed, and celebrate April as “White History” month by reporting on the exotic non-Hispanic white peoples of the USA. On a more serious note, we discuss the #CancelColbert controversy and the limits of satire. Plus, an illustrated poem walks us through the feeling of the ‘male gaze’.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: New Beginnings

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:
This week, Latino USA is larger than life! We start with a special two-part interview with actress Rita Moreno. Also, the life of one farmworker, now 83, who fought for her rights alongside labor leader César Chávez. We look at the legacy of Hugo Chávez, who died a year ago, and catch up on Venezuela’s current protests. The band La Santa Cecilia stands up for an undocumented bandmate. And we hear some sabiduría from “The Voice of God.”

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

 

This Week’s Captions: Hurt

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:
This week on Latino USA: what it means to be hurt. Journalist Jose Antonio Vargas tells host Maria Hinojosa about the pain he’s suffered, personally and professionally, for taking a stand for the undocumented. We hear stories of loneliness at “bailarina bars” in Queens, NYC. We learn how Latin@s deal with eating disorders. We learn about the little-known U-visa program, which helps victims of domestic violence. Spanish Harlem heals after a gas explosion displaces dozens. Latina moms discuss breastfeeding. We pay a visit to Laredo, Texas to feel the burn with jalapeño eating champs. And we get some words of wisdom about healing through art therapy.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: Live From SXSW

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:
This week on Latino USA we are back where it all began – Austin, Texas. We bring you a show recorded live at KUT’s Studio 1A where two Tejana sisters tell one crazy true story in two languages. We find out why being Latino can actually be an asset when it comes to a career in technology. We meet a DJ whose multicultural background makes him fearless about crossing genres. An old friend joins us to talk about the history of Latino USA and the role of Austin in it. And one of Austin’s most creative characters drops in to teach us about sound.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: Larger Than Life

THIS WEEKS SHOW:
This week, Latino USA is larger than life! We start with a special two-part interview with actress Rita Moreno. Also, the life of one farmworker, now 83, who fought for her rights alongside labor leader César Chávez. We look at the legacy of Hugo Chávez, who died a year ago, and catch up on Venezuela’s current protests. The band La Santa Cecilia stands up for an undocumented bandmate. And we hear some sabiduría from “The Voice of God.”

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: Queer

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:
This week on Latino USA, we talk about all things Queer—from Anthony Romero, the first gay director of the ACLU, to the practice of “pumping,” or black market silicone injections, in the trans community. We hear two stories about growing up and transitioning genders. We learn about the plight of LGBTQ detained immigrants. We investigate the paranormal in Laredo, Texas. Maria Hinojosa gets a surfing lesson in New York, of all places. We hear from a gay man who ran for class president at UNC. And we check in on the protests in Venezuela.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.” The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University. For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Show: Work It!

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:
Latinos have the highest rates of on-the-job injuries of any group of workers, across all industries, from construction to agriculture. From working with date palms to jobs as bounty hunters, business executives, and domestic workers, we hear all sorts of Latino perspectives of work. We’ll also take a look at the history of right-to-work states and what that history means for Latinos and unions. We hear about how Latinas are portrayed in business and what one stock photo company is doing to change that. Also, working up a new soccer team in Miami, and some words of wisdom from Cesar Chavez.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

THIS WEEK'S CAPTIONS: Let's...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: In this week's show,…

This Week's Captions: Money...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: From Puerto Rico to…

CAPTIONS

Audio visual notes for the hearing impaired.

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