Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Captions’ Category

This Week’s Captions: Larger Than Life

THIS WEEKS SHOW:
This week, Latino USA is larger than life! We start with a special two-part interview with actress Rita Moreno. Also, the life of one farmworker, now 83, who fought for her rights alongside labor leader César Chávez. We look at the legacy of Hugo Chávez, who died a year ago, and catch up on Venezuela’s current protests. The band La Santa Cecilia stands up for an undocumented bandmate. And we hear some sabiduría from “The Voice of God.”

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: Queer

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:
This week on Latino USA, we talk about all things Queer—from Anthony Romero, the first gay director of the ACLU, to the practice of “pumping,” or black market silicone injections, in the trans community. We hear two stories about growing up and transitioning genders. We learn about the plight of LGBTQ detained immigrants. We investigate the paranormal in Laredo, Texas. Maria Hinojosa gets a surfing lesson in New York, of all places. We hear from a gay man who ran for class president at UNC. And we check in on the protests in Venezuela.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.” The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University. For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Show: Work It!

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:
Latinos have the highest rates of on-the-job injuries of any group of workers, across all industries, from construction to agriculture. From working with date palms to jobs as bounty hunters, business executives, and domestic workers, we hear all sorts of Latino perspectives of work. We’ll also take a look at the history of right-to-work states and what that history means for Latinos and unions. We hear about how Latinas are portrayed in business and what one stock photo company is doing to change that. Also, working up a new soccer team in Miami, and some words of wisdom from Cesar Chavez.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: Justify My Love

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:
For our Valentine’s episode, Latino USA looks at love and sex. From those forced into sex trafficking and people who choose sex work out of economic need, to stories of love and immigration. We talk about Puerto Ricans in drag. And we hear about planning a cross-cultural wedding, as well as a love letter to a friend, just for being there.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Show: Control

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:
This week, Latino USA examines the notion of control, who has it, and how we lose it. First, we hear from Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards. Then, Pilar Marrero of La Opinión joins us to analyze the GOP’s immigration platform. We revisit the history of the IUD and ask teens about how they use condoms. We learn about Crisis Pregnancy Centers. We hear from D.C.’s Health and Human Services director, and discuss whether it’s even useful to call out racists on Twitter. And Maria Hinojosa reveals her own story of loss, decision, and empowerment.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Show: On Being Indigenous

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:
This week, Latino USA examines the lives of indigenous people throughout the country. We hear about the Zapatista community, twenty years after their uprising in the state of Chiapas, Mexico. We hear about the self-defense campaign carried out by farmers in the Mexican state of Michoacán. April Salazar shares her essay on ancestry. Producer Michael Simon Johnson brings us a story about three indigenous languages, and we hear about efforts to reach a Mayan community in Omaha. The Latino USA team debates whether Justin Bieber is deportable. And we remember Nuyorican poet Tato Laviera.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: Lessons Learned

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:
This week, an NPR poll tells us about Latino attitudes and habits, including the growing “Charismatic Catholic” movement. We learn about surfing with “Soul Surfer” J.P. Garcia. We remember Mercedes Sosa. We talk about how we’re all The Worst Latino. A PBS documentary looks back at Arizona’s S.B. 1070. Funnymen Al Madrigal and Lalo Alcaraz join us for some political coverage. We hear from Fusion’s Alicia Menendez about her new anchor job. And we continue our series on words of wisdom from poets

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

THIS WEEKS SHOW:
This week, Latino USA takes a look at how we deal with our neighbors. One police department in Alabama takes a gentle approach towards undocumented immigrants. A Georgia town provides a place for families of detainees. We hear about the new neighbor in college music (hint: it ain’t a capella). We examine the relationship between Major League Baseball and Cuban players who defect. Journalist Mirta Ojito joins us to discuss a murder and assault in Long Island. A reporter in Tucson asks whether he’s a gentrifier, and whether his neighbors feel that’s necessarily a bad thing. One Kansas town embraces the strangers who arrive.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: Ya Gotta Have Faith

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:
This week, we take a look at matters of faith: should immigration reform advocates regain faith in President Obama as deportations drop? What can we expect from the new pope? An undocumented lawyer’s faith in the legal system pays off as he’s finally allowed to practice. Marlon Bishop takes an in-depth look at a Brazil-based megachurch. A mother tells a story about how she prayed for her babies. We talk with two writers about their thoughts on feminism and the Catholic Church. And we kick off our series of poets offering us a bit of sabiduría.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Caption’s: A Little Variety!

THIS WEEK’S SHOW
This week, Latino USA rings in the new year with a little variety. Host Maria Hinojosa expresses some reasons for optimism. We remember the Zapatista uprising which began twenty years ago this week in Chiapas, Mexico. We hear about a Mayan dancer who now runs a company in New York City. We visit Brooks County, Texas to hear two stories about migration, and revisit Matamoros, Mexico to explore what the deported experience upon returning. Reporter Alex Schmidt takes us on a hunt for the Chicano Rock “Bigfoot.” And a perfumer tells us about her appetizing scents.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:
Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”
The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.
For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

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CAPTIONS

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