Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Captions’ Category

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: THE SUMMER JUKEBOX EDITION

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we help you get your summer playlist ready with an show dedicated to music. We sit down with Bajofondo’s Gustavo Santaolalla to talk about the group’s most recent album, “Presente.” We sit down with Venezuelan guitarist and singer Jose Luis Pardo from Los Amigos Invisibles; and, as part of our accordion series, we speak to Very Be Careful, a Los Angeles based band that’s helping revive Colombian vallenato in the U.S. Finally, an interview with Mexican rapper Carla Reyna, aka Niña Dioz.

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Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: STRAIGHT OUT OF COMMITTEE

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we bring you an update on the Senate immigration plan as it heads to the Senate floor. And we report from two of the dozens of schools shuttered in Chicago. We sit down with Dominican-American author Raquel Cepeda to talk about her memoir “Bird of Paradise: How I Became a Latina.” Finally, the premiere of “Rebel,” a story about the Cuban women who disguised herself as a man to fight in the Civil War.

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Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: CUTTING CHICAGO SCHOOLS

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, a look into elementary schools being shut down by Chicago officials, leaving many people angry and upset. And for this week’s “News Or Noise?”, Disney bows to Latino online mobilization after it tries to trademark “Dia de los Muertos.” Finally, we go to Tijuana, Mexico, where women roller derby fanatics give life to a fast growing sport.

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Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: For Bullets, It’s Open Borders

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we take you to Postville, Iowa, which five years ago was the site of the largest immigration raid in U.S history. Then, we look for answers on why U.S border patrol agents are shooting into Mexico and killing innocent civilians. And, we bring you a Mother’s Day commentary on the decision to become –or not to become– a mom. Finally, we go to a trailer park in Duroville, California where most its farmworker residents are leaving for newer housing.

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Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: Mexico In The Spotlight

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, with U.S immigration reform talks underway, we look at Mexico and its place in the discussion. Then, a look at violence and human rights abuses in Mexico, where women are often targets. And a commentary from a Mexican-American in Mexico City, a pocho in chilangolandia. Finally, the San Francisco Girls’ Chorus premieres “Santos” in California.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: The Enforcement Taboo

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, where’s immigration enforcement in the ongoing conversation around reform? And, we speak to two key Latino congressmen shaping immigration legislation from inside the House. Finally, the winner of the 2012 Pulitzer for theater talks about the long shadow cast by war over a Puerto Rican family in Philadelphia.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: IMMIGRANTS AND SOLITARY CONFINEMENT

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we look into immigrants in solitary confinement. Is it necessary, and how is it being handled? Then, a group of fourth graders travel from California to Washington, DC, to demand that their classmate, Rodrigo Guzman, be allowed back into the United States. And, the Associated Press announced it will stop using the term “illegal immigrant.” So is this news or is it noise? Finally, we get a peek inside the tempestuous relationship between Mexican artists Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, in their own words.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: Ethnic Studies Revisited

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, Latino USA guest host Felix Contreras talks to News Taco’s Victor Landa for a round up on prominent Latinos in entertainment, politics and religion; Then, we follow-up on the state of Ethnic Studies in U.S education. And we talk to the lead vocalist of Piñata Protest, fusing punk with traditional Mexican music. Finally, we pay tribute to Cuban pianist Bebo Valdes who died recently at age 94.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: News or Noise? The A-Word

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Get ready for our new series New or Noise where we take a look at media matters that may involve misunderstanding or misinformation and help you see the forest from the trees! First up: Amnesty. What does it mean? When did it become a dirty word? Our first News or Noise segment tells you more. Then we take you to North Carolina where undocumented teens are getting specially marked licenses. Is this helping? And we go digital—with an interview about a new web comedy series called East Willy B.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: Mining & The Women of Guatemala

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Come with us to Guatemala and hear about the many indigenous women there who are involved in clashes with multinational mining companies that they say threaten their way of life. Then travel back to the US to Texas, where an all-girl conjunto group got their groove back. And speaking of grooves—we bring you a taste of Helado Negro and his new record, Invisible Life.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

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CAPTIONS

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