Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Captions’ Category

This Week’s Captions: ARCHIVES: PRESIDENTIAL EDITION

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

In this special look back at twenty years of Latino USA, we hear interviews with four of the show’s most prominent guests. President Clinton calls for a dialogue on race in 1993. Barack Obama, still a senator in 2006, talks immigration reform. In a 1997 interview, author Junot Diaz talks about representing the Dominican Republic and New Jersey. And comedian George Lopez talks about his sitcom, which debuted in 2003, featuring a Latino family.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: MAS JUKEBOX

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Latino USA brings the summer tunes, with interviews and music from tropicalia band Os Mutantes , global music guru Sergent Garcia, and more.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: In the Air, On the Air

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we go to California to find out how agricultural workers are protecting themselves from deadly heat. Then, we learn about how residents of Albuquerque are measuring pollution in the air. We explore what we mean when we discuss bias in the news media. And we hear from immigrants to the US who don’t want to become citizens.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: The Latin Alternative Music Conference

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Latino USA returns to the Latin Alternative Music conference, a showcase of the latest and greatest tunes from across Latin America. Guest host Nadia Reiman digs through the best new music and talks to artists both old and new about what advice they could use, what advice they can give, and why Chile is going through a pop renaissance.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: The Border

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Latino USA spends this week on the U.S.-Mexico border. We’ll hear deported parents trying to bring their child back from the United States, a Mexican village along a re-opening border, and hear reviews of border crossings from Yelp.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: IMMIGRATION & DOMA

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, Latino USA takes a look at the recent Supreme Court ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act and what it means for immigrant same-sex couples. Then, we explore the identity of people who are both Muslim and Latino. We’ll take a trip to Brazil to hear the accordion dance music known as forró. And Host Maria Hinojosa takes an Independence Day look at Lady Liberty’s immigration status.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: DECISIONS, DECISIONS AT THE SUPREME COURT

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, the U.S. Supreme Court decides on crucial cases for Latinos.

For “News or Noise?” we talk about unpaid internships and their effects on journalism. Then, visit a dual language program in Florida, the state where bilingual education began. Finally, ten years after the U.S Navy ceased its practice range bombings in Vieques, artists get together to raise money for a radio station that will help Viequenses cope with new challenges.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: REPAINTING FARM LABOR… WITH BLUE

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we look at a Senate immigration proposal that could pave a quicker road to legalization, for farmworkers. And for “News or Noise?”… Why so much more media buzz on immigration deals for tech workers over farmworkers? Then, an ACLU lawsuit against the U.S. government for coercing immigrants to sign their own deportations. And we speak with Judy Reyes about the new Lifetime show Devious Maids. Finally, we talk to Destiny Galindo, a 17-year-old Arizonian who raps about democracy.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: INTO THE WILD… NEW WORLD

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we hear from Latino college graduates on what it’s like to step into the brave new world, with a little word of advice. And, a recent study shows Latinos entering U.S. colleges at a higher rate than any other ethnic group: but, what about college completion? Then, we bring you an update on Fisher v University of Texas at Austin, a case on affirmative action and college admission, soon to be decided by the U.S. Supreme Court. A look back at the “Bracero Program,” with a taste of injustice. Finally, a tour of a garden between the U.S. and Mexico where the flora and fauna defy the border fence.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: THE SUMMER JUKEBOX EDITION

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we help you get your summer playlist ready with an show dedicated to music. We sit down with Bajofondo’s Gustavo Santaolalla to talk about the group’s most recent album, “Presente.” We sit down with Venezuelan guitarist and singer Jose Luis Pardo from Los Amigos Invisibles; and, as part of our accordion series, we speak to Very Be Careful, a Los Angeles based band that’s helping revive Colombian vallenato in the U.S. Finally, an interview with Mexican rapper Carla Reyna, aka Niña Dioz.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

THIS WEEK'S CAPTIONS: Let's...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: In this week's show,…

This Week's Captions: Money...

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CAPTIONS

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