Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Cinema’ Category

“The State Of Arizona”: A Microscope On The Immigration Debate

When filmmakers Carlos Sandoval and Catherine Tambini arrived in Arizona in 2011 to shoot a documentary about the fierce battles over immigration happening in the state, they found a lot of angry people. Arizona’s controversial SB 1070 – better known as the “Show Me Your Papers Law” – was the harshest US anti-immigration bill in recent memory. Passions flared on both sides of the debate, and what started as a local initiative to curb immigration became a major national story that ultimately, changed the landscape of American politics as record numbers of Latinos made their voices heard in the 2012 presidential election in response.

Sandoval and Tambini’s new PBS documentary, “The State of Arizona,” brings audiences up-close to the front lines of those debates. Maria Hinojosa speaks with the filmmakers on about how, through intimate interviews with both anti- and pro-immigrant activists, “The State of Arizona” tells a story about the resilience and power of American democracy.

 

 

biopic-sandoval

Carlos Sandoval is the co-director/producer of the award-winning documentaries A Class Apart (American Experience 2009, Imagen Award), soon to be a major motion picture, and Farmingville (P.O.V. 2004, Sundance Special Jury Prize), which was about a small suburban town in the wake of the hate-based attempted murder of two Mexican day laborers.

 

 

 

biopic-tambini

Catherine Tambini is the co-director/producer of the award-winning documentary Farmingville. Ms. Tambini co-produced the Academy Award-nominated documentary Suzanne Farrell: Elusive Muse, which aired on PBS’s Great Performances/Dance In America. Born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, she holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the University of Oklahoma and a Master of Fine Arts degree from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts.

Narco Cultura


Photojournalist and film director Shaul Schwarz’s new documentary Narco Cultura contrasts Mexico’s drug violence with the music and fandom of narcocorridos–a style of music that celebrates the anti-heros of the Mexican cartels. Host Maria Hinojosa speaks with director Shaul Schwarz and former narcocorrido marketing director Joel Vazquez about the film, the musical movement of narcocorridos, and the state of Mexican-American self-identity. She also speaks with economist Rodrigo Canales about cartels as a business.

A1 Shaul SchwarzShaul Schwarz is an Israeli photojournalist and film director. His work has appeared in National Geographic, Newsweek, Time, The New York Times Magazine, El Pais Magazine, GQ and Marie Claire. His coverage of the conflict in Haiti in 2004 received two World Press Awards. Most recently he was honored with the 2008 Robert Capa Award given out by the Overseas Press Club.

 

 

 

A1 Joel Vazquez 2Joel Vazquez: Joel Vazquez works in advertising and marketing for narcocorrido bands. He is the former marketing director for Twiins Enterprises, one of the largest narcocorrido labels in the U.S.

 

 

 

 

A2 Rodrigo CanalesRodrigo Canales is an Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior at Yale School of Management. He researches the role of institutions in entrepreneurship and economic development. Specifically, Rodrigo studies how individuals purposefully change complex organizations or systems.

 

Latino Horror Fest

 What kinds of scary movies do Latinos love best? Maria Hinojosa talks with filmmaker Edwin Pagán, who runs the site latinhorror.com, about his favorites.

 Photo courtesy of Angus Stewart.

pagan Edwin Pagán is a New York-based filmmaker, producer, photographer, cinematographer, screenwriter and cultural activist with over 25-years of hands-on experience in content creation, film production, design concurrence and branding, and social media manager in both the documentary and narrative film sectors. His extensive experience with arts groups includes working at the Bronx Council on the Arts (BCA), Association of Hispanic Arts (AHA), and Black Filmmaker Foundation. He also co-founded the PAX Theatre Community artist collective as a means of expanding community-based arts participation in the South Bronx.

Pagán has served on the boards of various organizations including the National Association of Latino Independent Producers (NALIP) and was president of its New York chapter, and more recently the Hispanic Organization of Latino Actors (HOLA). He has also served on numerous juries, selection and curatorial committees for the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA), NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA), New York International Latino Film Festival and prestigious Tribeca Institutes’ Tribeca All Access Connects initiative, among others. He has also curated the NewLatino Filmmakers Screening Series at Anthology Film Archives for the past 10 years.

He is currently producing “BRONX BURNING,” a documentary that chronicles the rise, fall and resurrection of the South Bronx. His production company, Pagan-Images, will produce the film. Pagán is the founder-in-chief of LATIN HORROR, an online portal geared to the genre of Latin horror in all its forms. He is also writing a book on the subject titled “MIEDO – The History of Latin Horror.”

This Week’s Captions: Questions of Authority

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week’s Latino USA examines’ questions of authority: who abuses it? How do you get it? And how do you maintain it? We’ll hear the stories of veterans and law enforcement. We’ll hear from a New York councilman from community asserting its power, discuss authority in media with students, a professor, and Univision anchor Jorge Ramos. And we’ll hear from two authorities in acting, Eugenio Derbez and Rita Moreno.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Big Screen Crossover: Eugenio Derbez

Conventional wisdom says that Spanish-language movies don’t do well in the United States. But Mexican actor Eugenio Derbez set his sights north of the border, and his movie “Instructions Not Included” had the biggest opening weekend a Spanish-language movie has ever had. He joins Latino USA to talk about his crossover project.

Photo courtesy Pantelion Films

B3Eugenio_headshot_wikicommonsEugenio Derbez is arguably the most popular Mexican comedic actor of his generation. Due to his incredible ability to transform himself into any character, and to his extensive career in television, film and theatre, Much of his popularity is due to his television programs Al Derecho y al Derbez, XH-DRBZ, Vecinos, La Alegría del Hogar and La Familia P. Luche, which have had many of the highest audience ratings.In recent years, his outstanding career and his enormous ability as an actor have paved his way into the American film industry, allowing him to work alongside renowned actors such as Adam Sandler, Katie Holmes and Al Pacino, among others.

“Instructions Not Included” is his cinematic directorial debut.

 

 

 

This Week’s Captions: LATINA ARTISTS

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

In our final archive special for the month of August, we hear from three Latinas about their lives and creativity. Actress Salma Hayek talks to Maria Hinojosa about playing artist Frida Kahlo. Actress Rosie Perez discusses her Brooklyn roots and rise to fame. And we hear from Julieta Venegas about her influences and early career. Finally, a piece from 1993 asks that perpetual question: how do you identify yourself?

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Salma Hayek: On Being Frida Kahlo (2002)

Maria Hinojosa talks risk-taking and filmmaking with actress Salma Hayek in this interview from 2002.

Photo courtesy of Miramax.

Rosie Perez: Rising To Fame (1993)

In 1993, actress Rosie Perez was a rising Latina star. Reporter Mandalit del Barco brought us this profile of her rise to stardom from humble Brooklyn roots.

Photo courtesy of Warner Bros Pictures.

This Week’s Captions: The Border

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Latino USA spends this week on the U.S.-Mexico border. We’ll hear deported parents trying to bring their child back from the United States, a Mexican village along a re-opening border, and hear reviews of border crossings from Yelp.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Purgatorio

How should one view the US/Mexico border? Guest host Carolina Gonzalez talks to film director Rodrigo Reyes about his vision in his new documentary, Purgatorio.

 

Born in Mexico City in 1983, Rodrigo Reyes attended college in UC San Diego, as well as Madrid and Mexico City, earning degree in International Studies. Instead of following this career path, Reyes channeled his multi-cultural background in to becoming a filmmaker. Reyes has directed several documentaries exploring Mexico, including the experimental narrative Memories of the Future. In 2012, he was selected to the prestigious IFP Filmmaker Labs with his latest documentary Purgatorio. In 2013 this film premiered at the Guadalajara IFF as well as Los Angeles Film Festival to great reviews.

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