Archive for the ‘Cinema’ Category

“The State Of Arizona”: A Microscope On The Immigration Debate

When filmmakers Carlos Sandoval and Catherine Tambini arrived in Arizona in 2011 to shoot a documentary about the fierce battles over immigration happening in the state, they found a lot of angry people. Arizona’s controversial SB 1070 – better known as the “Show Me Your Papers Law” – was the harshest US anti-immigration bill in recent memory. Passions flared on both sides of the debate, and what started as a local initiative to curb immigration became a major national story that ultimately, changed the landscape of American politics as record numbers of Latinos made their voices heard in the 2012 presidential election in response.

Sandoval and Tambini’s new PBS documentary, “The State of Arizona,” brings audiences up-close to the front lines of those debates. Maria Hinojosa speaks with the filmmakers on about how, through intimate interviews with both anti- and pro-immigrant activists, “The State of Arizona” tells a story about the resilience and power of American democracy.

 

 

biopic-sandoval

Carlos Sandoval is the co-director/producer of the award-winning documentaries A Class Apart (American Experience 2009, Imagen Award), soon to be a major motion picture, and Farmingville (P.O.V. 2004, Sundance Special Jury Prize), which was about a small suburban town in the wake of the hate-based attempted murder of two Mexican day laborers.

 

 

 

biopic-tambini

Catherine Tambini is the co-director/producer of the award-winning documentary Farmingville. Ms. Tambini co-produced the Academy Award-nominated documentary Suzanne Farrell: Elusive Muse, which aired on PBS’s Great Performances/Dance In America. Born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, she holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the University of Oklahoma and a Master of Fine Arts degree from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts.

Narco Cultura


Photojournalist and film director Shaul Schwarz’s new documentary Narco Cultura contrasts Mexico’s drug violence with the music and fandom of narcocorridos–a style of music that celebrates the anti-heros of the Mexican cartels. Host Maria Hinojosa speaks with director Shaul Schwarz and former narcocorrido marketing director Joel Vazquez about the film, the musical movement of narcocorridos, and the state of Mexican-American self-identity. She also speaks with economist Rodrigo Canales about cartels as a business.

A1 Shaul SchwarzShaul Schwarz is an Israeli photojournalist and film director. His work has appeared in National Geographic, Newsweek, Time, The New York Times Magazine, El Pais Magazine, GQ and Marie Claire. His coverage of the conflict in Haiti in 2004 received two World Press Awards. Most recently he was honored with the 2008 Robert Capa Award given out by the Overseas Press Club.

 

 

 

A1 Joel Vazquez 2Joel Vazquez: Joel Vazquez works in advertising and marketing for narcocorrido bands. He is the former marketing director for Twiins Enterprises, one of the largest narcocorrido labels in the U.S.

 

 

 

 

A2 Rodrigo CanalesRodrigo Canales is an Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior at Yale School of Management. He researches the role of institutions in entrepreneurship and economic development. Specifically, Rodrigo studies how individuals purposefully change complex organizations or systems.

 

Latino Horror Fest

 What kinds of scary movies do Latinos love best? Maria Hinojosa talks with filmmaker Edwin Pagán, who runs the site latinhorror.com, about his favorites.

 Photo courtesy of Angus Stewart.

pagan Edwin Pagán is a New York-based filmmaker, producer, photographer, cinematographer, screenwriter and cultural activist with over 25-years of hands-on experience in content creation, film production, design concurrence and branding, and social media manager in both the documentary and narrative film sectors. His extensive experience with arts groups includes working at the Bronx Council on the Arts (BCA), Association of Hispanic Arts (AHA), and Black Filmmaker Foundation. He also co-founded the PAX Theatre Community artist collective as a means of expanding community-based arts participation in the South Bronx.

Pagán has served on the boards of various organizations including the National Association of Latino Independent Producers (NALIP) and was president of its New York chapter, and more recently the Hispanic Organization of Latino Actors (HOLA). He has also served on numerous juries, selection and curatorial committees for the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA), NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA), New York International Latino Film Festival and prestigious Tribeca Institutes’ Tribeca All Access Connects initiative, among others. He has also curated the NewLatino Filmmakers Screening Series at Anthology Film Archives for the past 10 years.

He is currently producing “BRONX BURNING,” a documentary that chronicles the rise, fall and resurrection of the South Bronx. His production company, Pagan-Images, will produce the film. Pagán is the founder-in-chief of LATIN HORROR, an online portal geared to the genre of Latin horror in all its forms. He is also writing a book on the subject titled “MIEDO – The History of Latin Horror.”

Big Screen Crossover: Eugenio Derbez

Conventional wisdom says that Spanish-language movies don’t do well in the United States. But Mexican actor Eugenio Derbez set his sights north of the border, and his movie “Instructions Not Included” had the biggest opening weekend a Spanish-language movie has ever had. He joins Latino USA to talk about his crossover project.

Photo courtesy Pantelion Films

B3Eugenio_headshot_wikicommonsEugenio Derbez is arguably the most popular Mexican comedic actor of his generation. Due to his incredible ability to transform himself into any character, and to his extensive career in television, film and theatre, Much of his popularity is due to his television programs Al Derecho y al Derbez, XH-DRBZ, Vecinos, La Alegría del Hogar and La Familia P. Luche, which have had many of the highest audience ratings.In recent years, his outstanding career and his enormous ability as an actor have paved his way into the American film industry, allowing him to work alongside renowned actors such as Adam Sandler, Katie Holmes and Al Pacino, among others.

“Instructions Not Included” is his cinematic directorial debut.

 

 

 

Salma Hayek: On Being Frida Kahlo (2002)

Maria Hinojosa talks risk-taking and filmmaking with actress Salma Hayek in this interview from 2002.

Photo courtesy of Miramax.

Rosie Perez: Rising To Fame (1993)

In 1993, actress Rosie Perez was a rising Latina star. Reporter Mandalit del Barco brought us this profile of her rise to stardom from humble Brooklyn roots.

Photo courtesy of Warner Bros Pictures.

Purgatorio

How should one view the US/Mexico border? Guest host Carolina Gonzalez talks to film director Rodrigo Reyes about his vision in his new documentary, Purgatorio.

 

Born in Mexico City in 1983, Rodrigo Reyes attended college in UC San Diego, as well as Madrid and Mexico City, earning degree in International Studies. Instead of following this career path, Reyes channeled his multi-cultural background in to becoming a filmmaker. Reyes has directed several documentaries exploring Mexico, including the experimental narrative Memories of the Future. In 2012, he was selected to the prestigious IFP Filmmaker Labs with his latest documentary Purgatorio. In 2013 this film premiered at the Guadalajara IFF as well as Los Angeles Film Festival to great reviews.

SECRET REBEL

Cuban immigrant Loreta Velazquez once disguised herself as a man just so she could fight in the Civil War. We speak to writer and director María Agui Carter about her film, “Rebel,” premiering nationwide on PBS.

Image courtesy of Flickr/TradingCardsNPS.

MariaMaría Agui Carter emigrated to the U.S. from Ecuador, grew up an undocumented “Dreamer” in New York City, and graduated from Harvard College. A filmmaker and scholar, she has won the George Peabody Gardner, Warren and Rockefeller Grants and has been a visiting scholar at Harvard and Tulane. Her work has been shown at film festivals and has been broadcast internationally. Based in Boston, she is an advocate for Latino and social issue filmmakers. She currently serves as the Chair of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers.

 

 

Watch Rebel – Preview on PBS. See more from VOCES.

POSTVILLE FIVE YEARS LATER

Five years ago, Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents closed in on a kosher slaughterhouse in Iowa and carried out the largest immigration raid in U.S history. Latino USA host María Hinojosa speaks with filmmaker Luis Argueta, director of “Abused: the Postville Raid,” a documentary about the raid’s impact on immigrant families and on the town.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image: Abused Documentary Facebook.

Luis Argueta (photo by Bea Gallardo)Luis Argueta is a film director and producer whose work spans features, documentaries, shorts and episodic TV. He has also worked as commercial director, lecturer and teacher in the United States, Europe and throughout the Americas.  Born and raised in Guatemala, Argueta is a US Citizen and has been a resident of New York since 1977. His film The Silence of Neto is the only Guatemalan film ever to have been submitted to the Academy Awards competition and he is the only Guatemalan director to have received a CLIO. In April 2009, the British newspaper The Guardian, listed Mr. Argueta as one of Guatemala’s National Living Icons, alongside Nobel Laureate Rigoberta Menchu and Singer/Songwriter Ricardo Arjona.

 

“Violeta Went to Heaven”

Chilean folksinger Violeta Parra helped revive her country’s traditional music and introduced the Nueva Canción genre to the world. “Violeta Went to Heaven,” a film about the life of Violeta Parra, is now playing in major U.S cities. Latino USA producer Andrés Caballero spoke to the film’s director, Andrés Wood, in New York City.


Click here to download this week’s show.  Image courtesy of Kino Lorber.

Wood.photoAndrés Wood is the director of “Violeta Went to Heaven.” He is also known for “Machuca,” “The Good Life” and “Football Stories.” Wood is an Economics graduate from Universidad Católica de Chile (1988). He also studied film at New York University.

 

 

“THE GIRL”

A Texas single-mother turned coyote and the Mexican girl who flips her plans upside-down are the subjects of director David Riker’s new film, “The Girl.” Latino USA host María Hinojosa speaks to film blogger Christine Davila for a review.


Click here to download this week’s show.  Image courtesy of www.davidrikersthegirl.com

Christine.photo Christine Dávila is a first generation Mexican-American born and raised in Chicago. Her passion for discovering original and underrepresented voices led her to pursue a career in film festival programming.  She started to screen films for the 2008 Sundance Film Festival where she is currently a Programming Associate, and also evaluates projects for Sundance Institute’s International Screenwriters lab.  Davila has also been an Associate Programmer for The San Francisco International Film Festival, Los Angeles Film Festival, and the Morelia International Film Festival.  She programs a monthly screening series in LA’s Downtown Independent theater.  A regular volunteer at Centro Del Pueblo, a non-profit community service center for at risk youth in Echo Park, she also writes, not as frequently as she’d like to, on her blog, Chicana from Chicago, a forum where she tracks, interviews and covers US Latino films and filmmakers.

BLESS ME, MIRIAM

The new film Bless Me, Ultima based on the Rudolfo Anaya novel is out now in theaters. Maria Hinojosa speaks to actor Miriam Colon, who stars as the curandera, Última.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Blessmeultima.com.

Miriam Colon_photo

Miriam Colon Valle is known as one of the pioneers of the Hispanic Theatre movement in New York City. She came to the United States with a scholarship through the University of Puerto Rico and later became the first Puerto Rican to be accepted at the Famed Actor’s studio. She was appointed to serve as the New York State Council for the Arts by former Governor Nelson Rockefeller. As the president and founder of the Puerto Rican Traveling Theatre Company Inc., she produced more than 100 plays.

 

NOTICIANDO: SUNDANCE, LATINO STYLE

We take a closer look on what’s Latino in this year’s Sundance Film Festival, which takes place this month in Park City, Utah. We talk to Sundance Festival Senior Programmer Shari Frilot, and to blogger, film critic and Sundance programming associate Christine Davila.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Christine Dávila is a first generation Mexican-American born and raised in Chicago. Her passion for discovering original and underrepresented voices led her to pursue a career in film festival programming.  She started to screen films for the 2008 Sundance Film Festival where she is currently a Programming Associate, and also evaluates projects for Sundance Institute’s International Screenwriters lab.  Davila has also been an Associate Programmer for The San Francisco International Film Festival, Los Angeles Film Festival, and the Morelia International Film Festival.  She programs a monthly screening series in LA’s Downtown Independent theater.  A regular volunteer at Centro Del Pueblo, a non-profit community service center for at risk youth in Echo Park, she also writes, not as frequently as she’d like to, on her blog, http://chicanafromchicago.com a forum where she tracks, interviews and covers US Latino films and filmmakers.

 

 

An alumna of Harvard/Radcliffe University, and the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program, Shari Frilot is a filmmaker who has produced television for the CBS affiliate in Boston and for WNYC and WNET in New York before creating her own independent award-winning films, including Strange & Charmed, A Cosmic Demonstration of Sexuality, What Is A Line? and the feature documentary, Black Nations/Queer Nations? She is the recipient of multiple grants, including the Ford Foundation and the Rockefeller Media Arts Foundation.

Shari is presently the Senior Programmer for the Sundance Film Festival. She is the curator and driving creative force behind New Frontier, an exhibition and commissioning initiative that focuses on cinematic work being created at the intersections of art, film and new media technology.

MICHAEL PEÑA: THE NEW CESAR

We bring you a profile of actor Michael Peña, a Mexican American from the south side of Chicago. Next year, Peña will star in a new film about legendary farmworker advocate Cesar Chavez. Lily Percy reports.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Lily Percy is a producer for NPR’s Weekend All Things Considered. She has also produced stories for StoryCorps and WNYC’s Soundcheck. The daughter of Colombian missionaries, she emigrated to Miami with her family at the age of five. She lives in Washington, D.C.

REVIEWING THE CENTRAL PARK FIVE

Host Maria Hinojosa speaks with Newsday film critic Rafer Guzman about The Central Park Five, a new documentary by Ken Burns and his daughter Sarah Burns about a 1989 case where five young men were convicted of the brutal rape of a jogger. This case became a lightning rod about youth of color and violence in New York and in the nation.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Rafer Guzman is the film critic for Newsday. He is also a contributing critic to WNYC’s “The Takeaway” and co-host of the podcast “Movie Date.”

 



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