Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Cinema’ Category

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: STRAIGHT OUT OF COMMITTEE

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we bring you an update on the Senate immigration plan as it heads to the Senate floor. And we report from two of the dozens of schools shuttered in Chicago. We sit down with Dominican-American author Raquel Cepeda to talk about her memoir “Bird of Paradise: How I Became a Latina.” Finally, the premiere of “Rebel,” a story about the Cuban women who disguised herself as a man to fight in the Civil War.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

SECRET REBEL

Cuban immigrant Loreta Velazquez once disguised herself as a man just so she could fight in the Civil War. We speak to writer and director María Agui Carter about her film, “Rebel,” premiering nationwide on PBS.

Image courtesy of Flickr/TradingCardsNPS.

MariaMaría Agui Carter emigrated to the U.S. from Ecuador, grew up an undocumented “Dreamer” in New York City, and graduated from Harvard College. A filmmaker and scholar, she has won the George Peabody Gardner, Warren and Rockefeller Grants and has been a visiting scholar at Harvard and Tulane. Her work has been shown at film festivals and has been broadcast internationally. Based in Boston, she is an advocate for Latino and social issue filmmakers. She currently serves as the Chair of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers.

 

 

Watch Rebel – Preview on PBS. See more from VOCES.

This Week’s Captions: For Bullets, It’s Open Borders

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we take you to Postville, Iowa, which five years ago was the site of the largest immigration raid in U.S history. Then, we look for answers on why U.S border patrol agents are shooting into Mexico and killing innocent civilians. And, we bring you a Mother’s Day commentary on the decision to become –or not to become– a mom. Finally, we go to a trailer park in Duroville, California where most its farmworker residents are leaving for newer housing.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

POSTVILLE FIVE YEARS LATER

Five years ago, Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents closed in on a kosher slaughterhouse in Iowa and carried out the largest immigration raid in U.S history. Latino USA host María Hinojosa speaks with filmmaker Luis Argueta, director of “Abused: the Postville Raid,” a documentary about the raid’s impact on immigrant families and on the town.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image: Abused Documentary Facebook.

Luis Argueta (photo by Bea Gallardo)Luis Argueta is a film director and producer whose work spans features, documentaries, shorts and episodic TV. He has also worked as commercial director, lecturer and teacher in the United States, Europe and throughout the Americas.  Born and raised in Guatemala, Argueta is a US Citizen and has been a resident of New York since 1977. His film The Silence of Neto is the only Guatemalan film ever to have been submitted to the Academy Awards competition and he is the only Guatemalan director to have received a CLIO. In April 2009, the British newspaper The Guardian, listed Mr. Argueta as one of Guatemala’s National Living Icons, alongside Nobel Laureate Rigoberta Menchu and Singer/Songwriter Ricardo Arjona.

 

“Violeta Went to Heaven”

Chilean folksinger Violeta Parra helped revive her country’s traditional music and introduced the Nueva Canción genre to the world. “Violeta Went to Heaven,” a film about the life of Violeta Parra, is now playing in major U.S cities. Latino USA producer Andrés Caballero spoke to the film’s director, Andrés Wood, in New York City.


Click here to download this week’s show.  Image courtesy of Kino Lorber.

Wood.photoAndrés Wood is the director of “Violeta Went to Heaven.” He is also known for “Machuca,” “The Good Life” and “Football Stories.” Wood is an Economics graduate from Universidad Católica de Chile (1988). He also studied film at New York University.

 

 

“THE GIRL”

A Texas single-mother turned coyote and the Mexican girl who flips her plans upside-down are the subjects of director David Riker’s new film, “The Girl.” Latino USA host María Hinojosa speaks to film blogger Christine Davila for a review.


Click here to download this week’s show.  Image courtesy of www.davidrikersthegirl.com

Christine.photo Christine Dávila is a first generation Mexican-American born and raised in Chicago. Her passion for discovering original and underrepresented voices led her to pursue a career in film festival programming.  She started to screen films for the 2008 Sundance Film Festival where she is currently a Programming Associate, and also evaluates projects for Sundance Institute’s International Screenwriters lab.  Davila has also been an Associate Programmer for The San Francisco International Film Festival, Los Angeles Film Festival, and the Morelia International Film Festival.  She programs a monthly screening series in LA’s Downtown Independent theater.  A regular volunteer at Centro Del Pueblo, a non-profit community service center for at risk youth in Echo Park, she also writes, not as frequently as she’d like to, on her blog, Chicana from Chicago, a forum where she tracks, interviews and covers US Latino films and filmmakers.

“The Languages of Natividad” with Captions

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Imagine not only not speaking English but also speaking a language like Mixteco—how would you go to the doctor? A new hospital in Salinas has found a fix for this. And this month’s Harper’s features an article called “This Land Is Not Your Land,” about labor migration in America’s heartland. We speak to its author. Are you ready for Oscar weekend? We are! We go Hollywood and talk to acting powerhouse Miriam Colon, who tells us about her starring role in the new film Bless Me, Ultima.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

 

BLESS ME, MIRIAM

The new film Bless Me, Ultima based on the Rudolfo Anaya novel is out now in theaters. Maria Hinojosa speaks to actor Miriam Colon, who stars as the curandera, Última.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Blessmeultima.com.

Miriam Colon_photo

Miriam Colon Valle is known as one of the pioneers of the Hispanic Theatre movement in New York City. She came to the United States with a scholarship through the University of Puerto Rico and later became the first Puerto Rican to be accepted at the Famed Actor’s studio. She was appointed to serve as the New York State Council for the Arts by former Governor Nelson Rockefeller. As the president and founder of the Puerto Rican Traveling Theatre Company Inc., she produced more than 100 plays.

 

NOTICIANDO: SUNDANCE, LATINO STYLE

We take a closer look on what’s Latino in this year’s Sundance Film Festival, which takes place this month in Park City, Utah. We talk to Sundance Festival Senior Programmer Shari Frilot, and to blogger, film critic and Sundance programming associate Christine Davila.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Christine Dávila is a first generation Mexican-American born and raised in Chicago. Her passion for discovering original and underrepresented voices led her to pursue a career in film festival programming.  She started to screen films for the 2008 Sundance Film Festival where she is currently a Programming Associate, and also evaluates projects for Sundance Institute’s International Screenwriters lab.  Davila has also been an Associate Programmer for The San Francisco International Film Festival, Los Angeles Film Festival, and the Morelia International Film Festival.  She programs a monthly screening series in LA’s Downtown Independent theater.  A regular volunteer at Centro Del Pueblo, a non-profit community service center for at risk youth in Echo Park, she also writes, not as frequently as she’d like to, on her blog, http://chicanafromchicago.com a forum where she tracks, interviews and covers US Latino films and filmmakers.

 

 

An alumna of Harvard/Radcliffe University, and the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program, Shari Frilot is a filmmaker who has produced television for the CBS affiliate in Boston and for WNYC and WNET in New York before creating her own independent award-winning films, including Strange & Charmed, A Cosmic Demonstration of Sexuality, What Is A Line? and the feature documentary, Black Nations/Queer Nations? She is the recipient of multiple grants, including the Ford Foundation and the Rockefeller Media Arts Foundation.

Shari is presently the Senior Programmer for the Sundance Film Festival. She is the curator and driving creative force behind New Frontier, an exhibition and commissioning initiative that focuses on cinematic work being created at the intersections of art, film and new media technology.

MICHAEL PEÑA: THE NEW CESAR

We bring you a profile of actor Michael Peña, a Mexican American from the south side of Chicago. Next year, Peña will star in a new film about legendary farmworker advocate Cesar Chavez. Lily Percy reports.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Lily Percy is a producer for NPR’s Weekend All Things Considered. She has also produced stories for StoryCorps and WNYC’s Soundcheck. The daughter of Colombian missionaries, she emigrated to Miami with her family at the age of five. She lives in Washington, D.C.

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

THIS WEEK'S CAPTIONS: Let's...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: In this week's show,…

This Week's Captions: Money...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: From Puerto Rico to…

CAPTIONS

Audio visual notes for the hearing impaired.

Join the conversation

© 2014 Futurov Media Group

Contact /

Your privacy is important to us. We do not share your information.

captcha

Tel /

+1 646-571-1220

Fax /

+1 646-571-1221

Mailing Address /

361 West 125st Street
Fourth Floor
New York, NY 10027