Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Cinema’ Category

Agustin Lara

Agustin Lara’s musical career started in his early childhood and it turned him into one of Mexico’s greatest legends.  He composed over 400 songs that have been recorded by world-renowned artists, ranging from Andrea Bocelli to Nat “King” Cole.  Best known for his passionate boleros, Lara also created rancheras, fox trots, waltzes, tangos, paso dobles, and even an operetta.  In the 30’s he became a major contributor to a new, yet flourishing Mexican film industry –  and he composed music for Santa, one of Mexico’s first films with sound.

There are many stories behind his music. Producer Angelica Luevano is in search of what made Lara one of the most influential musical personalities of Mexico.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Agustin Lara performs the soundtrack of the film classic María Bonita

Listen to one of Agustin Lara’s biggest hits, Veracruz

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Aventurera


Lola Beltran


For many Americans, the name Lola Beltran, brings to mind the title track of Pedro Almodovar’s 1988 hit film, Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown.  But Lola Beltran is much larger than one song or one film. One of the the most popular Ranchera artists in Mexico, she was known as Lola La Grande, “Lola the Great.”  Throughout her career she has starred in a number of films, musicals, a telenovela, and performed in front of numerous world leaders.

Alex Avila profiles the life and career of the Great Lola Beltran.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Latino Media Today

On this week’s program, we look at Latinos and the media: particularly, television. The Latino audience is a force to be reckoned with in the United States. Content produced for Latinos, both in Spanish and in English, is widespread–and hugely profitable. Recently, the Nielsen company reported that Univision is the most popular television network — that’s any network — for viewers 18-49 years old.

The programming on Univision runs the gamut from the serious, to the sensual, to the silly: Noticiero Univision, the network’s evening newscast, airs weeknights with anchor Jorge Ramos and María Elena Salinas. The network’s telenovelas include Soy tu dueña and Eva Luna, among many others. And no Saturday evening would be complete without an appearance by the master showman Don Francisco, longtime host of Sábado Gigante.

To examine the role that Latinos play in the media, and how the media has a role in communities throughout the United States and Latin America, we turn first to the University of Texas at Austin’s America Rodriguez.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.


Another perspective on Latinos and television comes from Flavio Morales at Mun2 [pronounced: mun-dos]. It is a hugely popular music and entertainment channel aimed at young Latinos. One of the most interesting things about the channel is that its hosts are continuously engaged in a complicated dance of code-switching, bouncing back and forth between English and Spanish within a single sentence. The rapid-fire Spanglish, and the channel’s tone and content, mirror the interests and behaviors of young Latinos.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

9500 Liberty

Maria talks with filmmaker Eric Byler about the documentary “9500 LIBERTY,” which he made with Annabel Park. It chronicles the public discussion, passage, and eventual repeal of an anti-immigrant measure in Prince William County, Virginia.

Byler describes the role of FAIR — the Federation for American Immigration Reform — in the anti-immigrant legislative efforts popping up around the country, including Arizona. FAIR, founded by John Tanton and directed by Dan Stein, is described by the Southern Poverty Law Center as a “Teflon Nativist Hate Group.”


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

The innovative film began with an interactive YouTube channel online. You can still watch many of the scenes which would eventually become the final documentary.

State legislators across the country have announced plans to introduce bills similar to Arizona’s SB-1070. Already, in just the first quarter of 2010, legislatures in 45 states have considered bills and resolutions dealing with immigration. The National Conference of State Legislatures is tracking the movement.

La Mission

Benjamin and Peter Bratt tackle homophobia and violence in the town where they grew up.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

‘Avatar’ and Native-American Themes

Earlier this month, Avatar, the big-budget science fiction space adventure film was nominated for nine Academy Awards. Just a few days later, it became the highest crossing movie of all time. Worldwide receipts for the film are now approaching $2 billion. And the film has been hailed as a critical as well as popular success.

But for many Avatar opens a discussion on Native-American themes as well as issues of historic colonialism. The film’s male lead, Jake Sculley played by Sam Worthington, is compared to a messianic figure. The movie’s female lead, a Na’vi named Neytiri played by Zoë Saldaña, is seen as a Pocahontas figure.

And the native connections of the Na’vi to their indigenous environment have focused on Native-American issues of colonialism, conquest, and cultural preservation.

To explore these issues more closely Latino USA’s Maria Hinojosa speaks with Native-American and Latina writers.

Kara Briggs is a Yakama and Snohomish Journalist and editor of the book Shoot The Indian: Media Misperception And Native Truth.Angela Valenzuela is an education professor at the University of Texas at Austin and author of several books and articles about Latinos, Latinas and education.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

THIS WEEK'S CAPTIONS: Let's...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: In this week's show,…

This Week's Captions: Money...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: From Puerto Rico to…

CAPTIONS

Audio visual notes for the hearing impaired.

Join the conversation

© 2014 Futuro Media Group

Contact /

Your privacy is important to us. We do not share your information.

captcha

Tel /

+1 646-571-1220

Fax /

+1 646-571-1221

Mailing Address /

361 West 125st Street
Fourth Floor
New York, NY 10027