Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Commentary’ Category

This Week’s Captions: The Border

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Latino USA spends this week on the U.S.-Mexico border. We’ll hear deported parents trying to bring their child back from the United States, a Mexican village along a re-opening border, and hear reviews of border crossings from Yelp.

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Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Yelping the Border

What do you think of your local border crossing? Well, now you can tell the world on Yelp. We talk with editorial cartoonist and Pocho.com editor Lalo Alcaraz.

 

 


Lalo Alcaraz is the creator of the first nationally-syndicated, politically-themed Latino daily comic strip, “La Cucaracha,” seen in scores of newspapers including the Los Angeles Times. He is also co-host of KPFK Radio’s popular satirical talk show, “The Pocho Hour of Power,” and co-founded the political satire comedy group Chicano Secret Service. His work has appeared in major publications around the world and he has won numerous awards and honors. Alcaraz received his Bachelor’s degree from San Diego State University, and earned his master’s degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a faculty member at Otis College of Art & Design in Los Angeles. Alcaraz was born in San Diego and grew up on the border.

This Week’s Captions: TACKLING THE GOP’S LATINO PROBLEM

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we bring you a report on the GOP’s Congressional split over how to fix immigration, and a roundtable discussion on the severed Latino/Republican relationship. Then, words of encouragement for the Mexican-American boy who sang the national anthem at the NBA finals Mariachi style who later received a wave of racist remarks. We also take you to Woodburn, a town in Oregon whose Latino population is the highest in the state, 60%. Finally, we pay tribute to Arturo Vega, the so-called fifth member of the punk band The Ramones, who died earlier this month.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Charrito de Oro

Ten-year-old Sebastian de la Cruz got a dream gig singing the U.S national anthem “Mariachi style” during this year’s NBA finals. But after his performance, a wave of bigoted remarks soon followed. Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa cheers on the little “Charro” for turning negativity into a chance to showcase his pride.

Check out el Charrito sing at Game 4 of the NBA finals.

This Week’s Captions: For Bullets, It’s Open Borders

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we take you to Postville, Iowa, which five years ago was the site of the largest immigration raid in U.S history. Then, we look for answers on why U.S border patrol agents are shooting into Mexico and killing innocent civilians. And, we bring you a Mother’s Day commentary on the decision to become –or not to become– a mom. Finally, we go to a trailer park in Duroville, California where most its farmworker residents are leaving for newer housing.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

TO BE, OR NOT TO BE

The decision to be a mother is just as important as the choice not to become one. This Mother’s Day, Latino USA Editor Leda Hartman brings us a commentary about deciding to become –or not become– a mom.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of MamasDay.Org

Leda.1Leda Hartman is a print and broadcast writer, reporter and editor. She is a longtime contributor to nationally broadcast public radio programs. Her work has aired on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Marketplace, Latino USA, Living on Earth, Studio 360, and The World and Voice of America.

This Week’s Captions: Mexico In The Spotlight

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, with U.S immigration reform talks underway, we look at Mexico and its place in the discussion. Then, a look at violence and human rights abuses in Mexico, where women are often targets. And a commentary from a Mexican-American in Mexico City, a pocho in chilangolandia. Finally, the San Francisco Girls’ Chorus premieres “Santos” in California.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Pochos in Chilangolandia

Commentator Daniel Hernandez is a pocho, a Mexican-American, living in Mexico City. But lately he’s noticed he’s not the only one, and the line between pochos and chilangos, what Mexico City natives call themselves, is blurring.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Screen-Shot-2012-06-07-at-6.00.08-PMDaniel Hernandez is a freelance journalist based in Mexico City and a news assistant in the Los Angeles Times bureau in Mexico. He’s been a staff writer at the L.A. Times and LA Weekly. A native of San Diego, Calif., Daniel is author of the 2011 book “Down & Delirious in Mexico City.”

NORTEÑO ACADEMY

In Salinas, California, a budding classical music star comes home to teach local kids how to play something quite different…Tex-Mex norteno music…for free. Radio Bilingue’s Farida Jhabvala Romero reports.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of the reporter.

 

Farida Jhabvala Romero reporting in Mendota, CA broccoli field Farida is a reporter for Radio Bilingüe, the National Latino Public Radio Network. She regularly covers health and the environment. She also contributes stories on California traditional artists for Radio Bilingüe’s series Raíces: Reportajes sobre Artistas del Pueblo. Prior to joining Radio Bilingüe, Farida worked as a reporter for El Mensajero, a San Francisco weekly, and other publications. She has a bachelor’s degree from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and currently lives in Alameda, California, with her husband Eric and 2-year old daughter Devika. She can be reached at farida@radiobilingue.org.

CINDY’S STORY

What does being in the “back of the line” mean for today’s undocumented immigrants? We speak to DREAMer Cindy about her opinion on both the Senate and the President’s proposal and her feelings on how effective either proposal would be.

Click here to download this week’s show. [Photo courtesy of Flickr.]

 

 

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