Archive for the ‘Culture’ Category

Two Tucsons: A Gentrification Story

One of Tuscon’s oldest Hispanic neighborhoods is slowly falling prey to that unstoppable force known as gentrification. Longtime Hispanic residents are slowly making room for newer, generally white newcomes. Reporter Aengus Anderson meets his new neighbors and finds out what his presence means to the future of Tuscon.

 

contributors1

 

B3_Aengus_HeadshotAengus Anderson is a digital media producer from Tucson. Most of his audio work is very long-format and explores how Americans think about the past, present, and future. His most recent project is The Conversation.

Dios Inc: Prosperity Gospel in Latino Communities

The Iglesia Universal in Woodside, Queens isn’t just an average, storefront neighborhood church. It’s massive, taking up an entire city block. Inside, a young pastor addresses God on behalf of the congregation, speaking Spanish with a thick Portuguese accent. He’s handsome, and smartly dressed.

“Dear Lord, when I put my hands on this person’s head, you’re going to open the door for a new job. This person needs to pay their debts. They need to receive this money,” he prays, almost screaming.

The Iglesia Universal del Reino de Dios, as the church is known is Spanish, has more than 6000 churches spread all over the globe.  Based in Brazil, it’s believed to be the largest Pentecostal congregation in the world. It’s been growing quickly as more and more Latin Americans abandon Catholicism in favor of Protestant churches.

Here in the US, there are about 100 branches, occupying everything from mini-mall storefronts to former movie palaces. Although the church is Brazilian, its theology is as American as apple pie.

“Tell yourself this, I’m going to make myself rich,” preaches the pastor, his voice steadily rising to a crescendo. “I’m not going to have the life my parents had! I won’t be poor! I reject being more. Is it a sin for me to say, God I want to have a lot?”

 

 

 

(more…)

A Iglesia Universal brand in Buenos Aires, Argentina (Credit: Roberto Fiadone/wikimedia commons)

An Iglesia Universal branch in Buenos Aires, Argentina (Credit: Roberto Fiadone/Wikimedia Commons)

Feminism And Our Lady Of Guadalupe

Our Lady of Guadalupe is a symbol of faith for both Mexican Catholics and non-Catholics. The brown virgin, who has strong associations with indigenous culture in Mexico, appeared to campesino Juan Diego in 1531 on a hill in what is now Mexico City. Writer Ray Salazar reads his essay about explaining La Virgen to his daughter, a budding young Chicana feminist.

 

 
RaySalazar

Since 1995, Ray has been an English teacher in the Chicago Public Schools.In March, The White Rhino tied for second place in the Best Blog category of the Education Writers Association contest: the 2012 National Awards for Education Reporting. In 2003, he earned an M.A. in Writing, with distinction, from DePaul University. In 2009, he received National Board Certification. His writing aired on National Public Radio and Chicago Public Radio many times. An editorial appeared in the Chicago Tribune. Two of the posts here appeared on CNN’s Schools of Thought Blog.Ray also writes for San-Antonio-based News Taco, which provides news and insights from a Latino perspective. For thirty years, Ray lived in Chicago’s 26th Street neighborhood. Today, he lives a little more south and a little more west in the city with his wife, son, and daughter.

Twentieth Anniversary of the Zapatista Uprising

Twenty years ago, an indigenous community in Mexico began a revolt that demanded justice, education, health, democracy, and much more. Latino USA looks back at the uprising that created a semi-autonomous area in the state of Chiapas, led by the EZLN, or Zapatistas.

 Photo by Susana Gonzalez/Newsmakers

40 Years Of Bilingual Radio

40 years ago, San Francisco based KBBF was the first station in the country to hit the airwaves in both English and Spanish. Today, 95% of Latinos across the nation tune into the radio at least once a week. We explore this tiny station’s history and how it continues to serve a growing and diverse audience.

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Nite_Owl

 

contributors1
Crosscurrents Live 2012 No Watermark-127Martina Castro is the Managing Editor of KALW News.  She started her career in journalism as an intern at National Public Radio in Washington D.C., and worked with NPR as a producer, trainer, and freelancer before coming to KALW.  Martina’s independent work has been featured nationally on NPR’s Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Day to Day, as well as the online radio magazine The [Un]Observed.

 

Banned Books Club

When the Arizona Department of Education banned 90 books from its public schools for being “subversive,” ban opponents struck back. They set up underground libraries across the Southwest. And in Albuquerque, they organized a banned book reading club.

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Jennifer-Lamusa

Carrie Jung headshot

Carrie Jung began reporting from New Mexico in 2011, following environmental news, education and Native American issues. She’s worked with NPR’s Morning Edition, PRI’s The World, National Native News, and The Takeaway.

Carrie graduated with a masters degree from Clemson University in 2009. She currently serves as Morning Edition Host and reporter for KUNM and The Fronteras Desk.

Narco Cultura


Photojournalist and film director Shaul Schwarz’s new documentary Narco Cultura contrasts Mexico’s drug violence with the music and fandom of narcocorridos–a style of music that celebrates the anti-heros of the Mexican cartels. Host Maria Hinojosa speaks with director Shaul Schwarz and former narcocorrido marketing director Joel Vazquez about the film, the musical movement of narcocorridos, and the state of Mexican-American self-identity. She also speaks with economist Rodrigo Canales about cartels as a business.

A1 Shaul SchwarzShaul Schwarz is an Israeli photojournalist and film director. His work has appeared in National Geographic, Newsweek, Time, The New York Times Magazine, El Pais Magazine, GQ and Marie Claire. His coverage of the conflict in Haiti in 2004 received two World Press Awards. Most recently he was honored with the 2008 Robert Capa Award given out by the Overseas Press Club.

 

 

 

A1 Joel Vazquez 2Joel Vazquez: Joel Vazquez works in advertising and marketing for narcocorrido bands. He is the former marketing director for Twiins Enterprises, one of the largest narcocorrido labels in the U.S.

 

 

 

 

A2 Rodrigo CanalesRodrigo Canales is an Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior at Yale School of Management. He researches the role of institutions in entrepreneurship and economic development. Specifically, Rodrigo studies how individuals purposefully change complex organizations or systems.

 

Al & Lalo’s Big Adventure

Our favorite funny men, Al Madrigal and Lalo Alcaraz return to Latino USA for their regular segment. This month they tell us the things they’re thankful for that they couldn’t discuss with their families. It’s not the stuff you’d expect. And we get to hear all about Lalo’s new adventure in television.

 Photo courtesy of Lalo Alcaraz.

contributors1

 

MADRIGAL-300x168A correspondent on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart” since 2011, Al Madrigal has been named Best Stand-Up Comedian by the HBO/U.S. Comedy Arts Festival and his material dubbed “dynamic” by The New York Times. His unique, spontaneous and fast-paced lyrical storytelling style has made him a regular on television with numerous appearances on Comedy Central including his own half-hour Comedy Central Presents Special.

 

 

 

Lalo_hs-150x150Lalo Alcaraz is the creator of the first nationally-syndicated, politically-themed Latino daily comic strip,“La Cucaracha,” seen in scores of newspapers including the Los Angeles Times. He is also co-host of KPFK Radio’s popular satirical talk show, “The Pocho Hour of Power,” and co-founded the political satire comedy group Chicano Secret Service. His work has appeared in major publications around the world and he has won numerous awards and honors. Alcaraz received his Bachelor’s degree from San Diego State University, and earned his master’s degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a faculty member at Otis College of Art & Design in Los Angeles. Alcaraz was born in San Diego and grew up on the border.

How Does your Latino Family Celebrate Thanksgiving?

Latinos have a way of making American traditions all their own. We asked you on Twitter and Facebook, how does your family add some Latino flair to Thanksgiving? Latino USA producer Brenda Salinas joins host Maria Hinojosa in the studio to share your responses.

Photo courtesy of Alejandro Linares Garcia, Wikimedia Commons

Latino Horror Fest

 What kinds of scary movies do Latinos love best? Maria Hinojosa talks with filmmaker Edwin Pagán, who runs the site latinhorror.com, about his favorites.

 Photo courtesy of Angus Stewart.

pagan Edwin Pagán is a New York-based filmmaker, producer, photographer, cinematographer, screenwriter and cultural activist with over 25-years of hands-on experience in content creation, film production, design concurrence and branding, and social media manager in both the documentary and narrative film sectors. His extensive experience with arts groups includes working at the Bronx Council on the Arts (BCA), Association of Hispanic Arts (AHA), and Black Filmmaker Foundation. He also co-founded the PAX Theatre Community artist collective as a means of expanding community-based arts participation in the South Bronx.

Pagán has served on the boards of various organizations including the National Association of Latino Independent Producers (NALIP) and was president of its New York chapter, and more recently the Hispanic Organization of Latino Actors (HOLA). He has also served on numerous juries, selection and curatorial committees for the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA), NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA), New York International Latino Film Festival and prestigious Tribeca Institutes’ Tribeca All Access Connects initiative, among others. He has also curated the NewLatino Filmmakers Screening Series at Anthology Film Archives for the past 10 years.

He is currently producing “BRONX BURNING,” a documentary that chronicles the rise, fall and resurrection of the South Bronx. His production company, Pagan-Images, will produce the film. Pagán is the founder-in-chief of LATIN HORROR, an online portal geared to the genre of Latin horror in all its forms. He is also writing a book on the subject titled “MIEDO – The History of Latin Horror.”

Turning Art into Activism: Favianna Rodriguez

You have probably seen her posters at immigrant rights marches around the country, but never knew who the artist was behind the captivating images. Artist, activist, and California native Favianna Rodriguez joins the live show to discuss where the personal meets the intersection of art and activism, and how she sees her own artwork fitting into the fight for immigrant rights. She also talks about how California issues have had a larger impact nationwide.

Below are the images Favianna talks about during her interview:

A1_1 slideshow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A1_3_BUTTERFLY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A1_2_PROTEST

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A1_4_KIDS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A1_5_WOMEN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A1_faviannaFavianna Rodriguez is a transnational interdisciplinary artist and cultural organizer. Her art and collaborative projects deal with migration, global politics, economic injustice, patriarchy, and interdependence . Rodriguez lectures globally on the power of art, cultural organizing and technology to inspire social change, and leads art workshops at schools around the country. In addition to her fine arts and community work, Rodriguez partners with social movement groups around the world to create art that’s visionary, inspirational, radical and, most importantly, transformational. When Favianna is not making art, she is directing CultureStrike, a national arts organization that engages artists, writers and performers in migrant rights. In 2009, she co-founded Presente.org, a national online organizing network dedicated to the political empowerment of Latino communities.

About Culture/Strike:

CultureStrike began in the summer of 2010 as a petition to honor the boycott of Arizona after that state passed its anti-immigrant law SB 1070. CultureStrike, which includes Wordstrike and Artstrike, seeks to organize artists, writers and other creative workers to strike back against anti-immigrant laws and attitudes. Their work is premised on the belief that culture, as the realm of ideas, images, and stories, is where people make sense of the world, find meaning and forge solidarity.

Eddie Zazueta: Bay Area Rhymes

Nineteen-year-old Bay Area poet and rapper Eddie Zazueta writes about hip hop, street culture, and life in the Bay Area. He performed two original pieces for us at our live show in Sacramento.

Eddie opened with his song “Around the Sun,” where he speaks to the influence of hip-hop in his life:

And he closed with a performance of his poem “South Berkeley,” where he talks about life in the neighborhood where he grew up, and how it’s changing.

Photo courtesy of Youth Radio.

B1_Eduardo_Zazueta

Eddie Zazueta is a rapper and poet from Oakland, California. Eddie is a youth participant of Remix Your Life, a program of Youth Radio. Youth Radio is an Oakland-based media company that focuses on training youth in various forms of media production.

Forbidden Words and Forgotten Arts: Daniel Alarcón

Peruvian-born author Daniel Alarcón brings us a story about cultural adaptation and breaking interracial taboos, called “The Forbidden Word”. The story was originally produced by Radio Ambulante, the Spanish-language storytelling radio program he runs. He talks with Maria Hinojosa about the project, and discusses his new novel, titled “At Night We Walk in Circles”, about a young Latin American actor traveling with an avant-garde theater group. Special thanks to Radio Ambulante’s Martina Castro.

And here’s Radio Ambulante’s original “Palabra Prohibida/Forbidden Word” story, en español:

 

Daniel Alarcon (c) Adrian KinlochDANIEL ALARCÓN is author of “War by Candlelight”, a finalist for the 2005 PEN-Hemingway Award, and “Lost City Radio”, named a Best Novel of the Year by the San Francisco Chronicle and The Washington Post, among others. His writing has appeared in McSweeney’s, n+1, and Harper’s, and he has been named one of The New Yorker’s 20 under 40. He lives in San Francisco, California.

About Radio Ambulante: Radio Ambulante is a Spanish-language radio program that tells Latin American stories from anywhere Spanish is spoken, including the United States.

Draco Rosa: Lucha y Vida

Maria Hinojosa talks to musician Robi Draco Rosa about his fight against cancer, his life as a former child performer, and his latest album “Vida,” which features performers like Ricky Martin and Shakira. The former Menudo heartthrob gives insight into his view on life’s struggles and how they are reflected in his art. He is now launching his first tour since his illness.

Photo courtesy Digital Girl Inc.

untitled

Draco Rosa (born June 27, 1969), also known as Robi Draco Rosa and Robby Rosa, is a Puerto Rican Grammy Award winning musician, dancer, singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, record producer and actor. Born as Robert Edward Rosa Suárez on Long Island, New York and raised in Ponce, Puerto Rico, he originally garnered fame as a member of boy band Menudo in the 1980s. As co-writer and co-producer of many of Ricky Martin’s hits in English and in Spanish, he created the framework for the revolution in bilingual music careers that continue to dominate the charts to the present day. His latest album, Vida, is truly a celebration of life. He recorded it after he announced in 2011 that he had been diagnosed with cancer.

Sabiduría: Luchadores

For a few words of wisdom this week, we turn to the luchadores, the masked wrestlers of Mexico. Jasmine Garsd brings us the words of one fighter who’s been combating opponents in the ring, and homophobia in society. This luchador is part of Los Exóticos, a group of fighters in drag based in Mexico City.

Jasmine Garsd was born in Argentina and hosts NPR’s Alt.Latino podcast. As a journalist she’s worked on the NPR programs Morning Edition, Talk of the Nation and Tell Me More. She has covered a wide variety of topics for radio including immigration issues.

THIS WEEK'S CAPTIONS: Let's...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: In this week's show,…

This Week's Captions: Money...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: From Puerto Rico to…

CAPTIONS

Audio visual notes for the hearing impaired.

Join the conversation

© 2015 Futuro Media Group

Contact /

Your privacy is important to us. We do not share your information.

[bwp-recaptcha bwp-recaptcha-913]

Tel /

+1 646-571-1220

Fax /

+1 646-571-1221

Mailing Address /

361 West 125st Street
Fourth Floor
New York, NY 10027