Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

Sabiduría: Marta Moreno Vega

Our regular feature “Sabiduría,” is a few words of wisdom. This week, Marta Moreno Vega shares one of her favorite sayings.

 

Photo courtesy Flickr


marta fb

Photo courtesy Dr. Marta Moreno Vega Facebook Page

 

Marta Moreno Vega was born in El Barrio “Spanish Harlem” of Puerto Rican parents born in Puerto Rico. Dr. Vega, an Afro Puerto Rican, has dedicated her professional life to developing culturally grounded institutions placing the history and culture of African descendants in the Diaspora in the time clock of world history. She is founder and president of the Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute, an international not for profit organization located in New York City which she created in 1976.

 

School Stories

Friends of Latino USA share special moments when being Latino affected their education. Their stories are funny, sad and unexpected. Featuring Representative Luis Rodriguez, Sara Inés Calderón, Gustavo Arellano, Irmary Reyes and Michele Carlo.

Photo courtesy Lel4nd

OC Weekly editor Gustavo Arellano tells his story about bullying other kids:


Oregon professor Irmary Reyes Santos tells her school story about being subject to a language proficiency test-in spite of being a U.S. citizen:

Journalist Sara Ines Calderon tells her school story about being uncomfortable around privilege and power:

Congressman Luis Gutierrez tells his school story about being ignored because of language barriers:

Author Michele Carlo tells her story about growing up and filling out:

 

 

 

Dual Language Central

It’s been 50 years since the nation’s first bilingual education program started in Miami. Reporter Trina Sargalski  visits the Coral Way elementary school to find out the secret of its success.

Image courtesy of flickr.com/photos/librariesrock


head_shot_lasloTrina Sargalski is a freelance producer and reporter. She covers food and South Florida life for WLRN Miami Herald News. She also writes about food as the Miami editor of Tasting Table and as the editor of her own blog, Miami Dish.

Into the Wild… New World

For many students, summertime means graduation time. Getting into college is already a task on its own. But what about getting a job? We hear from three Latino graduates from Missouri and North Carolina about what it meant to finish college and about their transition from the school gates to the brave new world.

Photo courtesy of Flickr/My Standard Break From Life.

 

SergioWhen Sergio entered the University of North Carolina in 2006, there were only one or two other students there besides him who were undocumented, and he was careful to keep quiet about his status. Many of his friends and relatives had told him not to bother trying to go to college and to just get a job at Burger King or MacDonald’s, but Sergio didn’t listen to them. With the help of a full scholarship, he graduated in 2011 with a degree in English. He’s been working in the restaurant business since then. But when his Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals permit comes through, he hopes to work in education or a related profession.

GinaGeorgina Leal graduated from DePaul University with a B.A. in Anthropology and Latin American/Latino studies. She is currently completing a year of service with the Vincentian Mission Corps in St. Louis, and hopes to pursue a PhD in socio-cultural Anthropology.

 

 

jaysonJayson came to the U.S. from Guatemala with his family eight years ago. With scholarship money, he became the first in his family to go to college, graduating from the University of Richmond in 2012 with a degree in business administration. Because he’s undocumented, Jayson couldn’t get a job in his field and spent the last year painting houses. But once he gained a legal presence in the US through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, Jayson got several job offers and accepted one in hospital administration. He and his partner are expecting their first child this summer.

Latinos in College, the New and the Old

We often hear about Latinos being underrepresented in college campuses when compared to other ethnicities. A recent report, however, shows that for the first time, there are more Latino high school graduates entering college than whites. But what about finishing college? For an overview on new and old trends, María Hinojosa speaks with Richard Fry, senior research associate at the Pew Research Hispanic Center.

Photo courtesy of Flickr/always.amym.

 

Fry.photoRichard Fry is a senior economist at the Pew Research Hispanic Center. He is an expert on school and college enrollment in the United States, as well as the returns to education in the labor market, marriage market, and its connection to household economic well-being such as net worth. Before joining the Pew Research Center in 2002, he was a senior economist at the Educational Testing Service (ETS).

Diversity on Trial

Race-conscious admissions policies have opened the college doors for many Latino students. Now, Fisher v University of Texas at Austin, a case soon to be decided by the Supreme Court, may change how schools are allowed to factor in race. Latino USA host María Hinojosa speaks with Angelo Ancheta, a law professor at Santa Clara University and the Counsel of Record for a Friend of the Court brief filed in the Fisher case.

Image courtesy of Flickr.com/SalFalko.

Tanya

Angelo N. Ancheta is the director of the Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center at Santa Clara University School of Law. He is the former Director of the Civil Rights Project at Harvard University, and the former Executive Director at the Asian Law Caucus. Mr. Ancheta served as the Counsel of Record for the Friend of the Court Brief filed by the American Educational Research Association in the Fisher v University of Texas at Austin case.

CHICAGO SHUTDOWNS: WHAT’S LOST

Despite strong protests, the city of Chicago announced it would close 50 neighborhood public schools at the end of this school year. Students from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University reported on several of the schools listed for closure. One was home to an innovative program for children with special needs, the other ran health care and food programs for the neighborhood at large. Bryan Lowry, Jennifer Kirby report. Carrie Eidson contributed to this report.

Image courtesy of Flickr/chicagopublicradio.

Lowry Edit

Bryan Lowry is a graduate student in journalism at Northwestern University’s Medill School, specializing in public affairs reporting. He previously served as an English teacher in the San Francisco Unified School District for three years. The experience of working with children from San Francisco’s often overlooked low-income communities inspired him to embark on a career as journalist to tell the type of stories that sometimes fall through the cracks. He is a native of Pennsylvania and a graduate of Boston University.

KirbyPhotoJen Kirby is a graduate student at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, where she focuses on magazine writing and urban reporting. She previously worked in the non-profit sector and received her bachelor’s degree in international politics from Georgetown University in Washington, DC.

 

eidsonCarrie Eidson is a graduate student at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, where she focuses on urban affairs reporting. She is a native of Asheville, North Carolina.

 

CUTTING CHICAGO SCHOOLS

In Chicago, officials plan to shutter 54 schools they say are under-utilized. The closings are expected to save the city millions of dollars, but many are angry and upset. Students from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University examine the impact at two schools in a heavily Latino neighborhood on the west side. Paige Sutherland, Tanya Basu, Ananth Baliga and Lisa Carter report.

Image courtesy of Flickr/chicagopublicradio.

TanyaTanya Basu is a graduate student at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, where she focuses on economic reporting.

 

Lisa CarterLisa Carter is a journalism graduate student at Northwestern University. She is a native Texan who has written for publications in Chicago, Las Vegas, New York City, Austin and San Antonio.

 

 

ananthAnanth Baliga is from Mumbai, India and he is currently studying public policy reporting at the Medill School of Journalism. He began to study software engineering, but switched careers to follow his interest in political and public policy reporting. He previously worked in New Delhi Television, a national news channel in New Delhi, India, as an intern reporter.

 

Sutherland_biopicPaige Sutherland is a graduate student at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, where she focuses on urban reporting. She is originally from Boston, MA and received her bachelor’s degree from the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA.

Domestic Workers and Mediators

In Massachusetts, domestic workers and employers learn to resolve disputes through mediation, instead of in court. Shannon Mullen reports.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Andrew Stelzer. 

ShannonShannon Mullen is a film producer and a freelance journalist based in New England, where she files news and feature stories from around the region for National Public Radio’s flagship programs, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as American Public Media’s Marketplace. Her work has also been published in Edible Boston, Boston Magazine, the Boston Globe Magazine and New Hampshire Magazine.

Ethnic Studies: What’s Next?

Enrollment for Chicano Studies at San Diego State University is down. Meanwhile, a federal judge ordered Arizona’s Tucson School District to re-implement culturally relevant courses. So where do ethnic studies really stand in the U.S? Latino USA guest host Felix Contreras speaks to Alex Saragoza, professor of History at the Department of Comparative Ethnic Studies at the University of California at Berkeley.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of UCSD.

12Alex M. Saragoza is a professor of Chicano/Latino Studies at University of California, Berkeley’s Ethnic Studies Department. His research involves the racialization and inequity in Latin America, especially in Mexico and Cuba, and their intersections with immigration to the USA. He holds a PhD in Latin American History from the University of California, San Diego.

NORTEÑO ACADEMY

In Salinas, California, a budding classical music star comes home to teach local kids how to play something quite different…Tex-Mex norteno music…for free. Radio Bilingue’s Farida Jhabvala Romero reports.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of the reporter.

 

Farida Jhabvala Romero reporting in Mendota, CA broccoli field Farida is a reporter for Radio Bilingüe, the National Latino Public Radio Network. She regularly covers health and the environment. She also contributes stories on California traditional artists for Radio Bilingüe’s series Raíces: Reportajes sobre Artistas del Pueblo. Prior to joining Radio Bilingüe, Farida worked as a reporter for El Mensajero, a San Francisco weekly, and other publications. She has a bachelor’s degree from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and currently lives in Alameda, California, with her husband Eric and 2-year old daughter Devika. She can be reached at farida@radiobilingue.org.

NOTICIANDO: ARE THE KIDS ALL RIGHT?

Mexican-American children are falling behind their white peers when it comes to language and cognitive skills, according to a new report by the University of California, Berkeley, and UCLA. We speak to Bruce Fuller, professor and sociologist at UC Berkeley and co-author of the study.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Bruce Fuller is a Professor of Education and Public Policy at University of California, Berkeley. Working inside policy organizations and the academy over the past three decades, he has asked how public action best strengthens families and schools. Trained in political sociology, Professor Fuller’s recent projects center on small-scale organizations that sprout across diverse communities, such as charter schools and preschools, which often spread in response to the clumsy or gray character of central states.

His recent book, Standardized Childhood: The Political and Cultural Struggle over Early Education, examines how elite reformers often push for state incorporation of community programs, even eroding the authority and resources spread across diverse ethnic leaders. A college dropout, he eventually received his Ph.D. from Stanford University. Before Berkeley, Professor Fuller was a research sociologist at the World Bank and taught at Harvard’s School of Education.

NOTICIANDO: END OF THE YEAR NEWS TACO

Victor Landa, editor of News Taco, fills us in on the deferred action program that give residence and work permits to some undocumented young people, and we check in on a new one-million-dollar scholarship for UC Berkeley students. Plus Puerto Rican prisoners tweet behind bars.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Victor Landa is the founder and editor of NewsTaco, a website that provides news, analysis and critique from a Latino perspective. He worked as a writer and editor for 30 years, mostly with Telemundo and Univisión. Landa also contributed to the San Antonio Express-News, and he is an adviser on media strategy, message crafting, storytelling and public speaking.

 

COLLEGE WITHOUT PAPERS

How are colleges and universities in the US are dealing with undocumented students? We survey the nation and find a wide range – some schools, like the Illinois Institute of Technology, have a special liaison for them; other schools offer in-state tuition rates.  Some even offer “underground” classes. And not everyone agrees on what to do next.


Click here to download this week’s show. Photo courtesy of Freedom University Georgia. To find out more about Freedom University, check out their homepage. And to find out more about Tom Tancredo’s organization, The Rocky Mountain Foundation, click here.

 

 

FROM THE FIELDS TO THE CAPITOL

The Head Start program is usually aimed at preschoolers. But this summer, the program took three college students who have spent their lives as migrant farmworkers to Washington D.C. for an internship program that aims to open up their career horizons. We speak with the students before they head back to the fields and to school.


Click here to download this week’s show. Visit the National Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Association for more information about their program. To see their intern blog, visit www.nmshsainternblog.blogspot.com.


 

Sammy Benavidez is a student at St. Edwards University at Austin, Texas, majoring in Social work and minoring in Psychology. In the past, he participated in the Tri-Valley Head-Start program in Grafton, North Dakota, and in TMC Head Start Program in Mercedes, Texas. He hopes to get a Masters in Social Work and also pursue a PhD.
 

Evangelina Alvarez is from Royal City, Washington. She is currently enrolled at Washington State University, majoring in Business Management and Operations with a minor in Spanish. She hopes to one day own her own business.
 

Ivon Garcia was born in Puebla, Mexico. She came to the U.S. at age three with her parents who were migrant workers. She graduated from Bridgeport High School and she is currently a Junior at Washington State University, majoring in Human Development and minoring in Women Studies and Spanish.
 

Cleofas “Cleo” Rodriguez, Jr. is currently the Executive Director of the National Migrant Seasonal Head Start Association in Washington, DC. His parents were migrant farmworkers in Texas and other states. He has been a strong advocate for the emotional development of young children and their families, particularly those of migrant backgrounds.

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