Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

Class of 2030: Dual Language in the South

A demographic surge of young Latinos is making their way through school, and by the time they’re out of college, the year will be 2030. In this first installment of our year-long series, Maria Hinojosa talks to teacher Elizabeth Bonitz about how dual language programs have become more popular in her town of Siler City, North Carolina.

Photo courtesy of Flickr

Reporting on Schools

NPR education correspondent Claudio Sanchez talks about how the situation of Latinos in education has changed throughout his career.

Photo courtesy Flickr

 

claudio sanchez

Photo courtesy National Public Radio.

 

Former elementary and middle school teacher Claudio Sanchez is an Education Correspondent for NPR. He focuses on the “three p’s” of education reform: politics, policy and pedagogy. Sanchez’s reports air regularly on NPR’s award-winning newsmagazinesMorning EditionAll Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

STEM Sisters

Latinos are underrepresented in STEM—the science, technology, engineering, and math fields. But four recent STEM grads from DePaul University joined Maria Hinojosa for this first of many conversations about Latinas in STEM.

Photo courtesy thewomensmuseum

Sabiduría: Marta Moreno Vega

Our regular feature “Sabiduría,” is a few words of wisdom. This week, Marta Moreno Vega shares one of her favorite sayings.

 

Photo courtesy Flickr


marta fb

Photo courtesy Dr. Marta Moreno Vega Facebook Page

 

Marta Moreno Vega was born in El Barrio “Spanish Harlem” of Puerto Rican parents born in Puerto Rico. Dr. Vega, an Afro Puerto Rican, has dedicated her professional life to developing culturally grounded institutions placing the history and culture of African descendants in the Diaspora in the time clock of world history. She is founder and president of the Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute, an international not for profit organization located in New York City which she created in 1976.

 

School Stories

Friends of Latino USA share special moments when being Latino affected their education. Their stories are funny, sad and unexpected. Featuring Representative Luis Rodriguez, Sara Inés Calderón, Gustavo Arellano, Irmary Reyes and Michele Carlo.

Photo courtesy Lel4nd

OC Weekly editor Gustavo Arellano tells his story about bullying other kids:


Oregon professor Irmary Reyes Santos tells her school story about being subject to a language proficiency test-in spite of being a U.S. citizen:

Journalist Sara Ines Calderon tells her school story about being uncomfortable around privilege and power:

Congressman Luis Gutierrez tells his school story about being ignored because of language barriers:

Author Michele Carlo tells her story about growing up and filling out:

 

 

 

This Week’s Captions: DECISIONS, DECISIONS AT THE SUPREME COURT

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, the U.S. Supreme Court decides on crucial cases for Latinos.

For “News or Noise?” we talk about unpaid internships and their effects on journalism. Then, visit a dual language program in Florida, the state where bilingual education began. Finally, ten years after the U.S Navy ceased its practice range bombings in Vieques, artists get together to raise money for a radio station that will help Viequenses cope with new challenges.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Dual Language Central

It’s been 50 years since the nation’s first bilingual education program started in Miami. Reporter Trina Sargalski  visits the Coral Way elementary school to find out the secret of its success.

Image courtesy of flickr.com/photos/librariesrock


head_shot_lasloTrina Sargalski is a freelance producer and reporter. She covers food and South Florida life for WLRN Miami Herald News. She also writes about food as the Miami editor of Tasting Table and as the editor of her own blog, Miami Dish.

This Week’s Captions: INTO THE WILD… NEW WORLD

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we hear from Latino college graduates on what it’s like to step into the brave new world, with a little word of advice. And, a recent study shows Latinos entering U.S. colleges at a higher rate than any other ethnic group: but, what about college completion? Then, we bring you an update on Fisher v University of Texas at Austin, a case on affirmative action and college admission, soon to be decided by the U.S. Supreme Court. A look back at the “Bracero Program,” with a taste of injustice. Finally, a tour of a garden between the U.S. and Mexico where the flora and fauna defy the border fence.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Into the Wild… New World

For many students, summertime means graduation time. Getting into college is already a task on its own. But what about getting a job? We hear from three Latino graduates from Missouri and North Carolina about what it meant to finish college and about their transition from the school gates to the brave new world.

Photo courtesy of Flickr/My Standard Break From Life.

 

SergioWhen Sergio entered the University of North Carolina in 2006, there were only one or two other students there besides him who were undocumented, and he was careful to keep quiet about his status. Many of his friends and relatives had told him not to bother trying to go to college and to just get a job at Burger King or MacDonald’s, but Sergio didn’t listen to them. With the help of a full scholarship, he graduated in 2011 with a degree in English. He’s been working in the restaurant business since then. But when his Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals permit comes through, he hopes to work in education or a related profession.

GinaGeorgina Leal graduated from DePaul University with a B.A. in Anthropology and Latin American/Latino studies. She is currently completing a year of service with the Vincentian Mission Corps in St. Louis, and hopes to pursue a PhD in socio-cultural Anthropology.

 

 

jaysonJayson came to the U.S. from Guatemala with his family eight years ago. With scholarship money, he became the first in his family to go to college, graduating from the University of Richmond in 2012 with a degree in business administration. Because he’s undocumented, Jayson couldn’t get a job in his field and spent the last year painting houses. But once he gained a legal presence in the US through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, Jayson got several job offers and accepted one in hospital administration. He and his partner are expecting their first child this summer.

Latinos in College, the New and the Old

We often hear about Latinos being underrepresented in college campuses when compared to other ethnicities. A recent report, however, shows that for the first time, there are more Latino high school graduates entering college than whites. But what about finishing college? For an overview on new and old trends, María Hinojosa speaks with Richard Fry, senior research associate at the Pew Research Hispanic Center.

Photo courtesy of Flickr/always.amym.

 

Fry.photoRichard Fry is a senior economist at the Pew Research Hispanic Center. He is an expert on school and college enrollment in the United States, as well as the returns to education in the labor market, marriage market, and its connection to household economic well-being such as net worth. Before joining the Pew Research Center in 2002, he was a senior economist at the Educational Testing Service (ETS).

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