Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

Diversity on Trial

Race-conscious admissions policies have opened the college doors for many Latino students. Now, Fisher v University of Texas at Austin, a case soon to be decided by the Supreme Court, may change how schools are allowed to factor in race. Latino USA host María Hinojosa speaks with Angelo Ancheta, a law professor at Santa Clara University and the Counsel of Record for a Friend of the Court brief filed in the Fisher case.

Image courtesy of Flickr.com/SalFalko.

Tanya

Angelo N. Ancheta is the director of the Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center at Santa Clara University School of Law. He is the former Director of the Civil Rights Project at Harvard University, and the former Executive Director at the Asian Law Caucus. Mr. Ancheta served as the Counsel of Record for the Friend of the Court Brief filed by the American Educational Research Association in the Fisher v University of Texas at Austin case.

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: STRAIGHT OUT OF COMMITTEE

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we bring you an update on the Senate immigration plan as it heads to the Senate floor. And we report from two of the dozens of schools shuttered in Chicago. We sit down with Dominican-American author Raquel Cepeda to talk about her memoir “Bird of Paradise: How I Became a Latina.” Finally, the premiere of “Rebel,” a story about the Cuban women who disguised herself as a man to fight in the Civil War.

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Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

CHICAGO SHUTDOWNS: WHAT’S LOST

Despite strong protests, the city of Chicago announced it would close 50 neighborhood public schools at the end of this school year. Students from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University reported on several of the schools listed for closure. One was home to an innovative program for children with special needs, the other ran health care and food programs for the neighborhood at large. Bryan Lowry, Jennifer Kirby report. Carrie Eidson contributed to this report.

Image courtesy of Flickr/chicagopublicradio.

Lowry Edit

Bryan Lowry is a graduate student in journalism at Northwestern University’s Medill School, specializing in public affairs reporting. He previously served as an English teacher in the San Francisco Unified School District for three years. The experience of working with children from San Francisco’s often overlooked low-income communities inspired him to embark on a career as journalist to tell the type of stories that sometimes fall through the cracks. He is a native of Pennsylvania and a graduate of Boston University.

KirbyPhotoJen Kirby is a graduate student at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, where she focuses on magazine writing and urban reporting. She previously worked in the non-profit sector and received her bachelor’s degree in international politics from Georgetown University in Washington, DC.

 

eidsonCarrie Eidson is a graduate student at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, where she focuses on urban affairs reporting. She is a native of Asheville, North Carolina.

 

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: CUTTING CHICAGO SCHOOLS

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, a look into elementary schools being shut down by Chicago officials, leaving many people angry and upset. And for this week’s “News Or Noise?”, Disney bows to Latino online mobilization after it tries to trademark “Dia de los Muertos.” Finally, we go to Tijuana, Mexico, where women roller derby fanatics give life to a fast growing sport.

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Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

CUTTING CHICAGO SCHOOLS

In Chicago, officials plan to shutter 54 schools they say are under-utilized. The closings are expected to save the city millions of dollars, but many are angry and upset. Students from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University examine the impact at two schools in a heavily Latino neighborhood on the west side. Paige Sutherland, Tanya Basu, Ananth Baliga and Lisa Carter report.

Image courtesy of Flickr/chicagopublicradio.

TanyaTanya Basu is a graduate student at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, where she focuses on economic reporting.

 

Lisa CarterLisa Carter is a journalism graduate student at Northwestern University. She is a native Texan who has written for publications in Chicago, Las Vegas, New York City, Austin and San Antonio.

 

 

ananthAnanth Baliga is from Mumbai, India and he is currently studying public policy reporting at the Medill School of Journalism. He began to study software engineering, but switched careers to follow his interest in political and public policy reporting. He previously worked in New Delhi Television, a national news channel in New Delhi, India, as an intern reporter.

 

Sutherland_biopicPaige Sutherland is a graduate student at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, where she focuses on urban reporting. She is originally from Boston, MA and received her bachelor’s degree from the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA.

Domestic Workers and Mediators

In Massachusetts, domestic workers and employers learn to resolve disputes through mediation, instead of in court. Shannon Mullen reports.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Andrew Stelzer. 

ShannonShannon Mullen is a film producer and a freelance journalist based in New England, where she files news and feature stories from around the region for National Public Radio’s flagship programs, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as American Public Media’s Marketplace. Her work has also been published in Edible Boston, Boston Magazine, the Boston Globe Magazine and New Hampshire Magazine.

This Week’s Captions: Ethnic Studies Revisited

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, Latino USA guest host Felix Contreras talks to News Taco’s Victor Landa for a round up on prominent Latinos in entertainment, politics and religion; Then, we follow-up on the state of Ethnic Studies in U.S education. And we talk to the lead vocalist of Piñata Protest, fusing punk with traditional Mexican music. Finally, we pay tribute to Cuban pianist Bebo Valdes who died recently at age 94.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Ethnic Studies: What’s Next?

Enrollment for Chicano Studies at San Diego State University is down. Meanwhile, a federal judge ordered Arizona’s Tucson School District to re-implement culturally relevant courses. So where do ethnic studies really stand in the U.S? Latino USA guest host Felix Contreras speaks to Alex Saragoza, professor of History at the Department of Comparative Ethnic Studies at the University of California at Berkeley.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of UCSD.

12Alex M. Saragoza is a professor of Chicano/Latino Studies at University of California, Berkeley’s Ethnic Studies Department. His research involves the racialization and inequity in Latin America, especially in Mexico and Cuba, and their intersections with immigration to the USA. He holds a PhD in Latin American History from the University of California, San Diego.

NORTEÑO ACADEMY

In Salinas, California, a budding classical music star comes home to teach local kids how to play something quite different…Tex-Mex norteno music…for free. Radio Bilingue’s Farida Jhabvala Romero reports.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of the reporter.

 

Farida Jhabvala Romero reporting in Mendota, CA broccoli field Farida is a reporter for Radio Bilingüe, the National Latino Public Radio Network. She regularly covers health and the environment. She also contributes stories on California traditional artists for Radio Bilingüe’s series Raíces: Reportajes sobre Artistas del Pueblo. Prior to joining Radio Bilingüe, Farida worked as a reporter for El Mensajero, a San Francisco weekly, and other publications. She has a bachelor’s degree from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and currently lives in Alameda, California, with her husband Eric and 2-year old daughter Devika. She can be reached at farida@radiobilingue.org.

NOTICIANDO: ARE THE KIDS ALL RIGHT?

Mexican-American children are falling behind their white peers when it comes to language and cognitive skills, according to a new report by the University of California, Berkeley, and UCLA. We speak to Bruce Fuller, professor and sociologist at UC Berkeley and co-author of the study.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Bruce Fuller is a Professor of Education and Public Policy at University of California, Berkeley. Working inside policy organizations and the academy over the past three decades, he has asked how public action best strengthens families and schools. Trained in political sociology, Professor Fuller’s recent projects center on small-scale organizations that sprout across diverse communities, such as charter schools and preschools, which often spread in response to the clumsy or gray character of central states.

His recent book, Standardized Childhood: The Political and Cultural Struggle over Early Education, examines how elite reformers often push for state incorporation of community programs, even eroding the authority and resources spread across diverse ethnic leaders. A college dropout, he eventually received his Ph.D. from Stanford University. Before Berkeley, Professor Fuller was a research sociologist at the World Bank and taught at Harvard’s School of Education.

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