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Archive for the ‘Family’ Category

Listeners on “Papi”

Listeners comment on host Maria Hinojosa’s personal essay about her father and how Alzheimer’s has changed him and their relationship.

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Life with Papi

What’s it like to have a father known for being analytical who is suddenly faced with having Alzheimer’s? Host Maria Hinojosa shares a father’s day essay on how Alzheimer’s has changed her papi, and their relationship.

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Dr. Luis Zayas is the Professor of Psychology at the Washington School of Medicine in Saint Louis and the founder and director of the Center for Latino Family Research at the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University.

Professor Zayas’ clinical experience spans 25 years of working with children, adolescents, adults, and families working in community mental health, psychiatric clinics, pediatric rehabilitation, and community-based primary care medicine.

Zayas has been treating girls like Yanira for years, and he says that her situation is all too common. He believes that many suicide attempts by young Latinas are not necessarily born out of an actual desire for death; rather, it’s how these girls communicate their distress, their insufficient emotional well-being, the lack of open communication with their parents.

Zayas has been conducting a study of Latina girls, their families, and suicide. It’s groundbreaking research and has led him to say that he believes the root of the issue is the family members’ concept of sexuality, and the perceived strain on familial cohesion posed by the desire for teenage autonomy.

Listen to his extended interview with Maria.

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Recuerdos Navideños

For this week’s program, we turned to some of our friends to hear their memories of La Navidad; Christmas celebrations that were happy, sad, funny, and offbeat.

It’s all too easy to get caught up in the materialism of the Christmas season. Playwright Josefina Lopez shares a story that’s a perfect reminder of why the toys and games and clothes aren’t really what matter.

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New Orleans-based performance artist José Torres-Tama recalls a pivotal moment… his family’s first Christmas as homeowners.

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Monica Teresa Ortiz has very fond memories of spending Christmas with her family in Texas. But there’s something that’s pulling them apart…and this year, Monica is spending the holiday away from her family. Find out why.

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The appearance of the Christ child is supposed to be the joyous occurrence that the Christmas season is all about. But one year, on Three Kings Day, the Baby Jesus ended up causing some trouble in Michele Serros‘s family.

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Nature, Magic & Girl Power

As part of our RadioNature series, we talk to renowned children’s book author, Jan Bozarth, about the unique themes so central to her “Fairy Godmother Academy” books — nature, magic and girl empowerment. Jan also shares her recollections of a visit to her mother’s home country of Cuba.

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The Haitian Immigrant Dilemma in the Dominican Republic

The countries of Haiti and the Dominican Republic share 30,000 square miles that make up the Island of Hispanola. And although their histories have been intertwined since colonial times, there are also considerable differences – cultural, racial, linguistic, and economic. The Dominican Republic has had a stable democratic government and has the second largest economy in the Caribbean, while Haiti is still lacking a comprehensive governmental structure and is one of the poorest countries in the world. Their histories also share deep conflicts marked with blood. In the 1800s, Haiti occupied the Dominican Republic for decades. Then in 1937 nearly 30,000 Haitians were massacred on the border during the military dictatorship of Rafael Trujillo.

But when a devastating earthquake shook Haiti on January 12, 2010, the Dominican Republic was one of the first countries to provide aid for their neighbor. Since then, thousands of Haitians have migrated to the Dominican Republic and many of them have been living there without documentation. Now, over a year later, the conflicts and cultural clashes have resurfaced. Since the beginning of this year, nearly 6,000 Haitians have been deported to their native Haiti, which is still reeling — with a cholera epidemic, homelessness and electoral chaos. Human rights organizations now report race motivated attacks against Haitians living in the Dominican Republic. Maria Hinojosa traveled to the Island to report on what is happening there.

Produced by Xochitl Dorsey, Mixed and Engineered by Mincho Jacob, Edited by Maria Martin. Executive Producer Martha Spanninger.

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EXTRA: Listen to Vanessa’s story, a five-month pregnant Haitian woman who lives undocumented in the Dominican Republic.

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Impacts of Alabama’s Law

This past June, Alabama Governor, Robert Bentley, signed legislation know as HB-56 into law. Suddenly, Alabama has the strictest anti-immigration laws on the books. Samuel Brooke is a staff attorney with the Southern Poverty Law Center, one of the organizations challenging the law’s constitutionality.

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Alabama’s harsh new immigration law has immigrant families fleeing the state. But where are they going? Many are heading south to Florida, where jobs and services may not be sufficient to meet the increased need.

This story is produced by Andrew Stelzer and edited & mixed by Claire Schoen.

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Swimming at ‘The Point’

As part of our series RadioNature, Maria Hinojosa takes her kids for a swim with their 75-year old grandmother at the ‘The Point’ in Lake Michigan. It’s where her mother took her as a child, and where today, three generations connect with nature and each other in profound ways.

This story is produced by Nusha Balyan and edited by Deborah George.

RadioNature is a year-long series that looks at how people of color connect with nature. Funding comes from the REI Foundation.

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Kidnap Radio

My father’s kidnapping began on November 22, 1999 and ended August 13, 2000. He was kidnapped by the FARC and kept in 38 different places, spending the first months of his kidnapping alone, with only his guards and a radio, for company.

I was 19 when my father was kidnapped in Colombia. It was 1999. My mother came to my college campus to deliver the news and I flew to Bogota to be with my family for a few weeks. (My mother is American, my father’s Colombian and they divorced when I was 5.) After that, except for brief trips for a wedding and a funeral, I didn’t go back to the country where I was born until I traveled there to report this piece in the spring of 2009.

I was able to make the trip thanks to Jay Allison. I met Jay in Woods Hole through Ibby Caputo, a dear friend and a former intern at Atlantic Public Media. After hearing part of the story of my father’s kidnapping and rescue, Jay suggested I undertake this project and guided me along the way.

I asked my father to meet me in Bogota for a long weekend in April so that I could interview him. I had heard bits and pieces about the kidnapping in the intervening years – when I would visit our family — but in the course of our interviews I realized I had known very little about what he’d endured.

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Caracol Radio streams the radio show Voces del Secuestro every Saturday night from midnight to 6:00a Sunday.

This piece was produced for by Jay Allison.

Arturo O’Farrill and The Afro-Cuban Jazz Orchestra

Chico O’Farrill was one of Latin jazz music’s most creative voices. From his masterwork “The Afro Cuban jazz Suite” for Charlie Parker, through his work as an arranger for Dizzy Gillespie and others, to his critically acclaimed “Heart of a Legend” album released in his 70’s, Chico’s compositions and arrangements have been recognized as among the most innovative in Latin Jazz.

After 15 years of Sunday night performances in New York’s storied Birdland Jazz Club, the Chico O’Farrill Afro Cuban Jazz Orchestra ended its run last week, almost 10 years to the date of Chico O’Farrill’s passing. His son, Grammy Award-winning pianist and composer, Arturo, who had been leading the band, says the burden of running two orchestras, a non profit arts organization and his own smaller ensembles – not to mention his role as father and husband – made the choice inevitable.

Maria Hinojosa talks to Arturo about his father’s legacy, his own musical explorations, and what’s next now that his Sunday nights are free again.
Produced by David Cruz.

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Roundtable Debate About the Current Administration and Latinos

As Presidential campaigning begins to heat up, eyes are once again being cast on the Latino vote. Even Obama is in on the action, making visits this month to Puerto Rico and El Paso, Texas in hopes of wooing the Latino electorate.

But unlike 2008, the President is receiving a lukewarm reception, because this time around it’s more than just about jobs and the economy for Latinos. It’s about immigration. Now many Latinos are upset with Obama and the Democrats’ for their inaction on the issue, and equally offended by the Republican’s hostile anti-immigrant rhetoric. So what will it mean in the next election if immigration reform isn’t addressed? Will Latinos become disillusioned and not vote? Will they abandon support of the President? Or will they put their hopes in Obama’s second term?

Maria Hinojosa talks to Maria de los Angeles “Nena” Torres, Director and Professor of Latin American and Latino Studies at the University of Illinois in Chicago and Maria Teresa Kumar, Executive Director of Voto Latino, to find out how Latinos will push back on their lawmakers – both at the polls and on the streets.

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An Ode to Aura

Many spend a lifetime in search of their true soul mate and ultimate love –passionate and everlasting. Very few can say they’ve experienced it. Internationally acclaimed Guatemalan – American author and journalist Francisco Goldman is one of the lucky ones, but his love story has a tragic ending.

Goldman’s soul mate was the beautiful and talented Mexican writer, Aura Estrada. They got married in the summer of 2005, but less than two years later she died in a random swimming accident at their favorite beach in Mexico.

To cope with his grief, Goldman began to write. In his critically acclaimed novel Say Her Name, he chronicles their love story and deep spiritual connection through the prism of his bitter-sweet memories that at times blur the line between reality and fiction.

Maria Hinojosa recently sat down with Goldman to talk about his book and his life with Aura and after her death.

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An Ancient People in Exodus

Nearly half of Guatemala’s 14-million people are Mayan, whose first language is not Spanish. Through the years, they have preserved their ancient culture and over two-dozen languages indigenous to their different rural communities. These days, it is estimated that 1 out of 10 Guatemalans have migrated to the United States, many of them, Mayan.

In this special report funded by the Paul Robeson Fund, Latino USA’s Maria Martin visits some of the indigenous communities to find out why so many Mayans leave their families and their strong cultural traditions, and what happens when they return home.

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Algo Un Poco Mas Personal

Maria Hinojosa reflects on Osama Bin Laden’s death and her personal experiences from September 11, 2001.

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Bienvenidos a Casa

Telenovelas and radio novelas are wildly popular all over the world and in the United States, and now the dramatic Latin soap operas are starting a dialogue about sexual orientation. “Bienvenidos a Casa” or “Welcome Home” is a dramatic radio novela that addresses the problems Gay and Lesbian teens face in Latino communities that are deeply rooted in religion and conservative family values. Radio Bilingue, a non-profit bilingual satellite station, worked with the “Family Acceptance Project” to use the highly popular format as a means for social change.

BBC Radio’s Alex Collins reports on the Latino LGBT reality and how this new radio program can help change lives and family relationships.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.


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