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Archive for the ‘Family’ Category

The Psychology of Breast Cancer

Half of Latina breast cancer survivors suffer from depression. These rates are much higher than the average among other survivors. Dr. Kimlin Tam Ashing-Giwa at City of Hope in Los Angeles shares her research on the psychological aspects of recovery for women of color with our host Maria Hinojosa. She discusses the role of spirituality, family and beliefs about women’s responsibilities in helping or hindering detection, treatment and recovery.

Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of World News, Inc. (Flickr/Creative Commons).


Dr. Kimlin Tam Ashing-Giwa is professor and director of the Center of Community Alliance for Research and Education at City of Hope.  She received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Colorado-Boulder.  She serves on the Executive council of Los Angeles American Cancer Society (ACS) and The Intercultural Council on Cancer (ICC).

Let’s Talk About Sex

Teens in the Bronx have higher rates of sexually transmitted illnesses and pregnancy than their counterparts in other zones but they’re using condoms more and having sex less. So why are the rates so high? As part of our series on Latinos and health, reporter Audrey Quinn visits the Bronx and talks to community health advocate Vincent Guilamo-Ramos about trying to improve teen sexual health in this borough.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Audrey Quinn is a multimedia science journalist in Brooklyn, New York. She reports for a variety of public radio shows and multimedia outlets, blogs on health for CBS, produces podcasts and videos for The Mind Science Foundation, and co-directs Radio Cabaret NYC.

The Mighty Jícama

Performance artist Mero Cocinero Karimi has focused his work in the past few years around educating and empowering communities at risk for Type II diabetes. He shares part of a new performance piece, called “28 days of good energia,” drawn from stories and practices on food and health he’s collected around the country.

Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of All Googly.

Mero Cocinero Karimi is an Iranian-Guatemalan cook to revolutionaries & dreamers, and host of The Cooking Show con Karimi & Comrades, a live cooking performance for your heart, mind, stomach & funny bone. His role as an advocate for healthy communities through laughter & cooking has brought him to Alaska, Mexico, and everywhere in between. A frequent speaker on television shows & at universities, the Associated Press called his show ‘a globally flavored recipe that packs some punch lines.’ Mero is a proud graduate of the Paolo Freire Culinary Institute, and has cooked for such luminaries as DJ Peanut Butter Wolf, poets Tato Laviera, Jose Montoya, Yuri Kochiyama and Michele Serros, and hiphop superstar MF Doom. His latest episodes focus on cultural foods as a source of healing. For him ‘the revolution starts in the kitchen, one kitchen at a time.’

Noticiando: Deportations and Adoption

In 2007, Guatemalan immigrant Encarnacion Bail Romero was detained at an immigration raid where she worked. By the time she was released, her six-month-old U.S.-born son was handed to another family for adoption, and his name was changed from Carlos to Jameson against her will. For more on Romero’s fight for her child’s custody, we speak to Michelle Brané, the Director of Detention and Asylum at the Women’s Refugee Commission.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Michelle Brané is one of the nation’s foremost experts on U.S. immigration detention and reform. She is the Director of the Detention and Asylum program at the Women’s Refugee Commission, and she advocates for the critical protection needs of immigrant women, children and other vulnerable migrant populations in the United States. She authored the 2007 Women’s Refugee Commission landmark report on family detention, Locking Up Family Values and the 2009 report on unaccompanied migrant children, Halfway Home, and is the senior editor of all the Detention and Asylum Program’s reports. Ms. Brané is an attorney with more than 25 years of experience working on immigration and human rights issues.

Noticiando: Familia es Familia

Ingrid Duran co-founded a newly launched campaign called “Familia es Familia,” aimed at fostering a greater acceptance of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people within the Latino Community. Host Maria Hinojosa talks with her and with Anthony Romero of American Civil Liberties Union.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Ingrid M. Duran is Co-Founder & Principal of D&P Creative Strategies, a company that she and partner Catherine founded in 2004 to increase the role of corporate, legislative and philanthropic efforts in addressing the concerns of Latinos, women, and gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender (GLBT) communities. Prior to starting D&P, Ingrid was President & CEO of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute, where she expanded on an already extensive professional network that included members of Congress, elected officials and Fortune 500 executives.

Anthony D. Romero is the Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union, the nation’s premier defender of liberty and individual freedom. He took the helm of the organization just four days before the September 11, 2001 attacks. Romero also led the ACLU in establishing the John Adams Project, a joint effort with the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers to assist the under-resourced military defense lawyers in the Guantánamo military commissions. Born in New York City to parents who hailed from Puerto Rico, Romero was the first in his family to graduate from high school. He is a graduate of Stanford University Law School and Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public Policy and International Affairs. He is a member of the New York Bar Association and has sat on numerous nonprofit boards.

A Tree Grows in Watts

Urban grit and natural beauty exist side by side in a community garden in LA’s Jordan Downs Housing projects. Go on an audio tour of this garden as part of Latino USA’s Radio Nature series.

RadioNature is a year-long series that looks at how people of color connect with nature. Funding comes from the REI Foundation.

Click here to download this week’s show.

To see an audio slideshow, click below. You can make it full-screen to see it better:

Tena Rubio is an award-winning radio journalist based in San Francisco and Los Angeles. She’s a frequent contributor to NPR’s Latino USA and is the former host & executive producer of the nationally-syndicated show Making Contact. A former TV news writer and producer, she is currently a member of the board of directors for the Association of Independents in Radio (AIR).






Blair Wells is a Los Angeles-based photographer whose journey with camera-in-hand began in 2002, using throw-away Kodaks to visually articulate his experience living in Central L.A. His love of documentary photography has led him to capture the face and heart of social issues, including projects featuring post-Katrina New Orleans day-workers, the everyday moments of a Santa Barbara homeless family and health issues of kids living near the Port of Los Angeles. Blair has also organized participatory photography projects involving the deaf community, as well as teenagers with autism. His projects have given participants an opportunity to express themselves in new and profound ways. Through it all, the human condition — the struggles and successes of everyday people — remains the single most compelling subject of his work.







Listeners on “Papi”

Listeners comment on host Maria Hinojosa’s personal essay about her father and how Alzheimer’s has changed him and their relationship.

Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of


Life with Papi

What’s it like to have a father known for being analytical who is suddenly faced with having Alzheimer’s? Host Maria Hinojosa shares a father’s day essay on how Alzheimer’s has changed her papi, and their relationship.

Click here to download this week’s show.


Dr. Luis Zayas is the Professor of Psychology at the Washington School of Medicine in Saint Louis and the founder and director of the Center for Latino Family Research at the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University.

Professor Zayas’ clinical experience spans 25 years of working with children, adolescents, adults, and families working in community mental health, psychiatric clinics, pediatric rehabilitation, and community-based primary care medicine.

Zayas has been treating girls like Yanira for years, and he says that her situation is all too common. He believes that many suicide attempts by young Latinas are not necessarily born out of an actual desire for death; rather, it’s how these girls communicate their distress, their insufficient emotional well-being, the lack of open communication with their parents.

Zayas has been conducting a study of Latina girls, their families, and suicide. It’s groundbreaking research and has led him to say that he believes the root of the issue is the family members’ concept of sexuality, and the perceived strain on familial cohesion posed by the desire for teenage autonomy.

Listen to his extended interview with Maria.

Right click here to download an .mp3 of this segment

Recuerdos Navideños

For this week’s program, we turned to some of our friends to hear their memories of La Navidad; Christmas celebrations that were happy, sad, funny, and offbeat.

It’s all too easy to get caught up in the materialism of the Christmas season. Playwright Josefina Lopez shares a story that’s a perfect reminder of why the toys and games and clothes aren’t really what matter.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

New Orleans-based performance artist José Torres-Tama recalls a pivotal moment… his family’s first Christmas as homeowners.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Monica Teresa Ortiz has very fond memories of spending Christmas with her family in Texas. But there’s something that’s pulling them apart…and this year, Monica is spending the holiday away from her family. Find out why.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

The appearance of the Christ child is supposed to be the joyous occurrence that the Christmas season is all about. But one year, on Three Kings Day, the Baby Jesus ended up causing some trouble in Michele Serros‘s family.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Nature, Magic & Girl Power

As part of our RadioNature series, we talk to renowned children’s book author, Jan Bozarth, about the unique themes so central to her “Fairy Godmother Academy” books — nature, magic and girl empowerment. Jan also shares her recollections of a visit to her mother’s home country of Cuba.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.




The Haitian Immigrant Dilemma in the Dominican Republic

The countries of Haiti and the Dominican Republic share 30,000 square miles that make up the Island of Hispanola. And although their histories have been intertwined since colonial times, there are also considerable differences – cultural, racial, linguistic, and economic. The Dominican Republic has had a stable democratic government and has the second largest economy in the Caribbean, while Haiti is still lacking a comprehensive governmental structure and is one of the poorest countries in the world. Their histories also share deep conflicts marked with blood. In the 1800s, Haiti occupied the Dominican Republic for decades. Then in 1937 nearly 30,000 Haitians were massacred on the border during the military dictatorship of Rafael Trujillo.

But when a devastating earthquake shook Haiti on January 12, 2010, the Dominican Republic was one of the first countries to provide aid for their neighbor. Since then, thousands of Haitians have migrated to the Dominican Republic and many of them have been living there without documentation. Now, over a year later, the conflicts and cultural clashes have resurfaced. Since the beginning of this year, nearly 6,000 Haitians have been deported to their native Haiti, which is still reeling — with a cholera epidemic, homelessness and electoral chaos. Human rights organizations now report race motivated attacks against Haitians living in the Dominican Republic. Maria Hinojosa traveled to the Island to report on what is happening there.

Produced by Xochitl Dorsey, Mixed and Engineered by Mincho Jacob, Edited by Maria Martin. Executive Producer Martha Spanninger.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

EXTRA: Listen to Vanessa’s story, a five-month pregnant Haitian woman who lives undocumented in the Dominican Republic.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Impacts of Alabama’s Law

This past June, Alabama Governor, Robert Bentley, signed legislation know as HB-56 into law. Suddenly, Alabama has the strictest anti-immigration laws on the books. Samuel Brooke is a staff attorney with the Southern Poverty Law Center, one of the organizations challenging the law’s constitutionality.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Alabama’s harsh new immigration law has immigrant families fleeing the state. But where are they going? Many are heading south to Florida, where jobs and services may not be sufficient to meet the increased need.

This story is produced by Andrew Stelzer and edited & mixed by Claire Schoen.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Swimming at ‘The Point’

As part of our series RadioNature, Maria Hinojosa takes her kids for a swim with their 75-year old grandmother at the ‘The Point’ in Lake Michigan. It’s where her mother took her as a child, and where today, three generations connect with nature and each other in profound ways.

This story is produced by Nusha Balyan and edited by Deborah George.

RadioNature is a year-long series that looks at how people of color connect with nature. Funding comes from the REI Foundation.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.














Kidnap Radio

My father’s kidnapping began on November 22, 1999 and ended August 13, 2000. He was kidnapped by the FARC and kept in 38 different places, spending the first months of his kidnapping alone, with only his guards and a radio, for company.

I was 19 when my father was kidnapped in Colombia. It was 1999. My mother came to my college campus to deliver the news and I flew to Bogota to be with my family for a few weeks. (My mother is American, my father’s Colombian and they divorced when I was 5.) After that, except for brief trips for a wedding and a funeral, I didn’t go back to the country where I was born until I traveled there to report this piece in the spring of 2009.

I was able to make the trip thanks to Jay Allison. I met Jay in Woods Hole through Ibby Caputo, a dear friend and a former intern at Atlantic Public Media. After hearing part of the story of my father’s kidnapping and rescue, Jay suggested I undertake this project and guided me along the way.

I asked my father to meet me in Bogota for a long weekend in April so that I could interview him. I had heard bits and pieces about the kidnapping in the intervening years – when I would visit our family — but in the course of our interviews I realized I had known very little about what he’d endured.

Right click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Caracol Radio streams the radio show Voces del Secuestro every Saturday night from midnight to 6:00a Sunday.

This piece was produced for by Jay Allison.


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