Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Family’ Category

Amor Prohibido

Noami Mena, a San Francisco State student, was attracted to her British boyfriend's strong Catholic upbringing.

Assimilation into the American mainstream, say many social scientists, often takes two-to-three generations for most immigrant groups. A major part of that assimilation can usually be seen in the intermarriage of couples from differing ethnic backgrounds. It’s not unusual these days to find Americans with mixed Irish-German or Polish backgrounds, for example. But there was a time in American history that these groups would rarely intermingle.

So when children of immigrants begin dating outside of their ethnic group, the familial effects can be unexpected.

As part of our ongoing series on Immigration in the U.S., NPR’s Richard Gonzales reports on a growing trend among second-generation Americans who are choosing to date and marry with partners with whom they are “culturally comfortable.”


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Bárbara Renaud González

Bárbara Renaud González, a native-born Tejana and acclaimed journalist, has written a lyrical story of land, love, and loss, bringing us a first novel of a working-class Tejano family set in the cruelest beauty of the Texas panhandle. Her story exposes the brutality, tragedy, and hope of her homeland and helps to fill a dearth of scholarly and literary works on Mexican and Mexican American women in post–World War II Texas.

Maria Hinojosa talks with Bárbara Renaud González about Golondrina, Why Did You Leave Me?.


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Children Sue the Government for Deporting Parents

The Pew Hispanic Center estimates that some 4 million American citizen children live with at least one parent who is undocumented in this country. And since the 1996 Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act, having an American citizen child no longer held sway with immigration judges.U.S. Immigration authorities estimate that some 100,000 undocumented parents with citizen children have been deported over the last decade.

Maricela's children went on a three-day hunger strike to try and prevent their mother's deportation.

But critics of this policy say it is an unfair burden on American-born children, pulling apart families. Supporters of the policy counter that American policy isn’t unfair, but rather put the blame on the immigrants who broke the law by migrating illegally.

Reporter Marine Olivesi brings the story of some American citizen children whose parents were deported, and are fighting back with a class action lawsuit.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

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