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Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

The Story of the Sonoran Hot Dog

In Chicago they put Italian peppers and pickles on their hot dogs. In Seattle they do cream cheese and chives.

The Sonoran hot dog —Arizona’s most beloved street food— is a bacon-wrapped hot dog covered in pinto beans and fresh salsa as well as a host of other optional toppings including guacamole, mayo, mustard, mushrooms and hot peppers.

Fernanda Echavarri, a reporter for KUAZ Arizona Public Media, recently went on a taste test of Tucson’s top Sonoran dog purveyors with DJ and poet Logan “Dirtyverbs” Phillips. They visited BK Carne Asada & Hot Dogs and El Güero Canelo, two of the most famed makers of this borderland specialty.

Photo via Fernanda Echavarri

Zorayda’s Oils

In this bocadito, or little morsel of news, we introduce you to Chicago’s Zorayda Ortiz, a perfumer who makes oils that smell like food.

Pavochón: Puerto Rican-style Turkey

When reporter Von Diaz was a girl celebrating Thanksgiving in Puerto Rico, her abuela ruled the kitchen. Each year she created a magical dish called a pavochón, a turkey cooked like a traditional Puerto Rican pork roast. This year, she tries to recreate the dish with her grandmother’s help.



Von Diaz is a multimedia journalist based in New York City. Her reporting focuses on immigration, Cuba, and LGBT issues. She was born in Puerto Rico and raised in Atlanta, GA.She has published her work on PRI’s The World, WNYC, and New American Media.

Food Stamp Fight

This November 1st, Americans receiving food stamps will have a little less to eat. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, was expanded during the recession as part of the 2009 Stimulus Package. Food stamp enrollment in the US has doubled between 2007 and now, from 26 million to 48 million people. But on November 1st, this expansion is set to expire, and millions of Americans will see their benefits reduced. Meanwhile, Congress is considering further cuts to the program. Producer Diana Montaño talks to New Yorkers to see how these cuts will affect them.

Photo by Latino USA


Diana HeadshotDiana Montaño is a Mexico City-born, East Coast-raised producer for Latino USA. Before coming on board, she worked as an editor at the Phnom Penh Post in Cambodia and as an associate producer with Radio Bilingüe in California. Diana has also taught video production to immigrant and refugee youth in Oakland, and to young indigenous women in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico. She is a graduate of the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

Austin Breakfast Tacos

Breakfast taco fiend Mando Rayo takes us on a tour of the best morning eateries in Austin, Texas. He is the co-author of “Austin Breakfast Tacos: The Story of the Most Important Taco of the Day”.

Photo courtesy of Filipa Rodrigues


Haley_PicHaley Howle is a radio producer for KUTX in Austin, Texas. Previously, Howle worked as a producer for the award-winning music journalism program Texas Music Matters and worked to launch the Austin Music Map. She is an eighth generation Texan and prefers her breakfast tacos on flour tortillas with a large horchata on ice.

Homemade Oakland Tamales

Carolina Santos and her mother, Rosa Oliva, make tamales, tacos, and all sorts of other food for office workers and other clients, who are usually in San Francisco. But in West Oakland, California, where they live, the corner stores that exist offer little of the fresh produce they have access to in the food business. Maria Hinojosa spends a day with them and brings us her report.

And click below to listen to Rosa Oliva share her recipe for mole Oaxaqueño, en español:

The People’s Kitchen

Lisa Morehouse reports on the People’s Kitchen, an Oakland-based pay-what-you-can restaurant that happens once a month. Using only fresh, organic produce, the People’s Kitchen tries to raise money to for various charity events and raise consciousness about food issues.

Photo courtesy of The People’s Kitchen

Lisa-Morehouse-150x150Lisa Morehouse is an award-winning independent public radio and print journalist, who’s filed for KQED’s The California Report, NPR’s Latino USA and All Things Considered, Edutopia magazine and McSweeney’s. Her reporting has taken her from Samoan traveling circuses to Mississippi Delta classrooms to the homes of Lao refugees in rural Iowa. She’s currently working on After The Gold Rush: The Future of Rural California, an audio documentary website and series. A former public school teacher, Morehouse also works with at-risk youth to produce radio diaries.

Ode To The Plantain

Maria Hinojosa and producer Daisy Rosario sit down to chat about that staple of the Caribbean Latino’s diet, the plantain. Or, as Daisy calls it, “the Latino potato.”


Daisy_faceDaisy Rosario is a comedian, writer and producer of things from radio stories to live events. Recently graduated from the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, she also works with The Moth and the Upright CitizensBrigade Theatre. Daisy is an obsessive baseball fan.

Decolonize Your Tortilla!

Heads up, tortilla snobs! A pair of California professors behind the blog Decolonize Your Diet! show us how to make fresh homemade tortillas the traditional way. They’re not just tastier, they’re healthier.

Photo courtesy of Tena Rubio


C1_Tena+Rubio+for+BioTena Rubio is an award-winning radio journalist based in San Francisco and Los Angeles. She’s a contributor to NPR’s Latino USA and is the former host & executive producer of the national public affairs show, Making Contact. A former TV news writer and producer, she is currently the Board Secretary for the Association of Independents in Radio (AIR).



Dr. Luz Calvo is an Associate Professor at California State University, East Bay
Dr. Catriona Rueda Esquibel is an Associate Professor, San Francisco State University




Heritage You Can Taste

UNESCO, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization included traditional Mexican cuisine on its list of world cultural treasures worth preserving two years ago. A group of Mexican Academics have put together the first cookbook to be included on Unesco’s Intangible Cultural Heritage list. Latino USA’s Brenda Salinas talks to the book’s publisher, Margarita de Orellana from Artes de Mexico, and visits Chef Joe Quintana at his New York restaurant, Rosa Mexicano, to get a taste for what all the buzz is about. On the menu, the caviar of corn: huitlacoche crêpes.

Photo by Latino USA


Margarita de Orellana is the director of the Mexican publishing house Artes de México. She studied Communications at the Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City and Cinematography in L’Université de Vincennes in Paris, where she lived for almost a decade.  She also has a Phd. In Contemporary Compartive History from the École des Hautes Études en Science Sociales.


Chef Joe Quintana is the Executive Chef at Rosa Mexicano in Union Square, New York City. The New York native studied at Queensborough Community College.




Sabiduría: Eating To Heal

The information we get from doctors around food and health can often be scary or off-putting. Robert Karimi, performing as Mero Cocinero, wants to bring together stories, culture and other recipes for good health. Are we to take what doctors tell us as gospel, or is it just another level of chisme? Karimi’s new performance project, Viva la Soul Power! is a pop up performance kitchen with delicious happenings all throughout Chicago to get people to reconnect to their cultures to promote well-being and counter Type 2 Diabetes and obesity. It has online and live events in Chicago throughout the month of October.

Mero Cocinero Karimi is an Iranian-Guatemalan cook to revolutionaries & dreamers, and host of The Cooking Show con Karimi & Comrades, a live cooking performance for your heart, mind, stomach & funny bone. His role as an advocate for healthy communities through laughter & cooking has brought him to Alaska, Mexico, and everywhere in between. A frequent speaker on television shows & at universities, the Associated Press called his show ‘a globally flavored recipe that packs some punch lines.’

Latino Vintage

Alex Sotelo arrived in California’s Napa Valley from Zacatecas, Mexico 22 years ago as a farmworker, and fell in love with the art and science of winemaking. He is now the owner his own winery, Alex Sotelo Cellars. Producer Diana Montaño joins him at the Summit Wine and Food Festival in Summit, New Jersey, where his wine is being featured for the fifth year in a row.

Image courtesy of Summit Wine and Food Festival.

C2_AlexAlex Sotelo was born in Jerez, Zacatecas Mexico; he came to Napa in 1991 and started to work in the vineyards as many immigrants do. It took many years of schooling and endless hours in the vineyards, doing experiments in the cellars and the valor to pursue his passion to get to where he is now, a well established and admired winemaker. For Alex this is a dream come true.




Every year, there is a Coquito taste contest in New York City where the audience decides which is the best of these Puerto Rican holiday drinks. Hear the sounds (and the winner) of one Coquito contest qualifier competition.

Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Why’d You Eat That (creative commons).

The winner of the Coquito Masters 2012 is Zoraida Graciani. Congrats!


Latinos who live in the United States are twice as likely to go hungry than the rest of Americans, according to a yearly survey by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Alfredo Estrada, editor of Latino Magazine, tells us about “No Mas Hambre,” an initiative to raise awareness and encourage people to act.

Click here to download this week’s show.
Register for the “No Mas Hambre” Summit to take place Washington, DC on December 7, 2012

Alfredo J. Estrada is the editor of Latino Magazine, a publication that focuses on politics and culture. Estrada is a nationally recognized expert on Hispanic media who has served on the boards of KRLU-TV, the Harvard Hispanic Policy Journal, and other organizations. He also founded HISPANIC, an award-winning magazine for U.S. Hispanics.

Latinos And The Obesity Epidemic

Obesity is the second leading cause of preventable deaths in the US after cigarette smoking. Latinos are especially hard hit, developing diabetes and other obesity related health problems at high rates. Reporter Nova Safo visits the predominantly Latino city of Santa Ana, California to see how biology, economics and environment all contribute to the problem.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Nova Safo is a Los Angeles-based reporter who covers a wide variety of topics ranging from the Hollywood entertainment industry, to visual arts, culture, politics, policy, health, science, the future of energy, economics, and the occasional massive wildfire.
His reporting has been heard on NPR’s various newsmagazines and other public radio programs, and published online by Yahoo! News and others. He is the recipient of Hearst journalism awards for radio reporting, as well as an NLGJA/RTNDA award for excellence in online journalism.


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