Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

Does Fixing Food Deserts Help Fix Obesity?

A number of cities have taken up programs to put more fresh foods into corner stores to improve so-called “food deserts.” Nevin Cohen, an assistant professor at the New School in New York, shares his thoughts on whether having more fresh fruits and vegetables in low-income neighborhoods really affects obesity rates–or if the problem goes beyond access to certain foods.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Inhabitat New York City.

Nevin Cohen is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies at The New School,where he teaches courses in urban food systems and environmental studies, including cross-disciplinary courses that connect the fields of policy, urban planning, design, and urban studies. Dr. Cohen’s current research focuses on the development of urban food policy. He has a PhD in Urban Planning from Rutgers University, a Masters in City and Regional Planning from Berkeley, and a BA from Cornell.

The Mighty Jícama

Performance artist Mero Cocinero Karimi has focused his work in the past few years around educating and empowering communities at risk for Type II diabetes. He shares part of a new performance piece, called “28 days of good energia,” drawn from stories and practices on food and health he’s collected around the country.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of All Googly.

Mero Cocinero Karimi is an Iranian-Guatemalan cook to revolutionaries & dreamers, and host of The Cooking Show con Karimi & Comrades, a live cooking performance for your heart, mind, stomach & funny bone. His role as an advocate for healthy communities through laughter & cooking has brought him to Alaska, Mexico, and everywhere in between. A frequent speaker on television shows & at universities, the Associated Press called his show ‘a globally flavored recipe that packs some punch lines.’ Mero is a proud graduate of the Paolo Freire Culinary Institute, and has cooked for such luminaries as DJ Peanut Butter Wolf, poets Tato Laviera, Jose Montoya, Yuri Kochiyama and Michele Serros, and hiphop superstar MF Doom. His latest episodes focus on cultural foods as a source of healing. For him ‘the revolution starts in the kitchen, one kitchen at a time.’

A Tree Grows in Watts

Urban grit and natural beauty exist side by side in a community garden in LA’s Jordan Downs Housing projects. Go on an audio tour of this garden as part of Latino USA’s Radio Nature series.

RadioNature is a year-long series that looks at how people of color connect with nature. Funding comes from the REI Foundation.


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To see an audio slideshow, click below. You can make it full-screen to see it better:

Tena Rubio is an award-winning radio journalist based in San Francisco and Los Angeles. She’s a frequent contributor to NPR’s Latino USA and is the former host & executive producer of the nationally-syndicated show Making Contact. A former TV news writer and producer, she is currently a member of the board of directors for the Association of Independents in Radio (AIR).

 

 

 

 

 

Blair Wells is a Los Angeles-based photographer whose journey with camera-in-hand began in 2002, using throw-away Kodaks to visually articulate his experience living in Central L.A. His love of documentary photography has led him to capture the face and heart of social issues, including projects featuring post-Katrina New Orleans day-workers, the everyday moments of a Santa Barbara homeless family and health issues of kids living near the Port of Los Angeles. Blair has also organized participatory photography projects involving the deaf community, as well as teenagers with autism. His projects have given participants an opportunity to express themselves in new and profound ways. Through it all, the human condition — the struggles and successes of everyday people — remains the single most compelling subject of his work.

 

 

 

 

 

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Know Your Pro: What’s Cooking in Graciela’s Kitchen?

Find out the Mexican secret for perfect French pastries from Graciela Gamero. She has been baking apple pies, croissants and other French pastries at the Medici Bakery in President Barack Obama’s old Chicago neighborhood of Hyde Park for 25 years.

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Graciela Gamero was born in the Durango province of Mexico and has lived in Chicago, Illinois, for over 30 years. She has worked as a baker at Hyde Park’s Medici Bakery for 25 years. She attributes her long tenure at the Medici to its late owner Hans Morsbach, who believed in her.

Novela approaches to diabetes

Treason is at the heart of the telenovela Retos para una vida saludable. But instead of a swarthy Romeo, the threat is sweet, salty and fatty foods. University of Massachusetts Medical School Associate Professor Milagros Rosal, PhD, and her colleagues developed the soap as part of the Lawrence Latino Diabetes Prevention project, a $2.6 million, federally funded intervention to help Latinos in Lawrence, Massachusetts prevent and manage diabetes.

This story is produced by Amy Mayer and mixed by Jones Audio Productions. It’s part of a year-long series examining health issues facing Latinos. Latino USA’s year-long look at Latinos and Health is made possible by funding from Pfizer Helpful Answers®, a family of patient assistance programs for the uninsured and underinsured who need help getting Pfizer medicines.


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Amy Mayer spent a year-and-a-half in Buenos Aires after college, before returning to the United States. She has reported on a variety of subjects literally from the far north (Alaska) to the far south (Australia and Argentina). She has been a reporter, producer, and host at NPR member stations and has produced freelance stories for a variety of programs and networks. In 2011, she produced the hour-long documentary Peace Corps Voices. Her print work has appeared in the New York Times, Boston Globe, Real Simple and many other publications.

Taco USA

Author and columnist Gustavo Arellano visits a new-school taco truck in Irvine, California, and explains how it is only the latest example of the long-standing American love affair with Mexican food.   Arellano also speaks with Latino USA’s Maria Hinojosa about his new book “Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America.”


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Gustavo Arellano

is editor of the OC Weekly, an alternative newspaper in California. Gustavo also writes “¡Ask a Mexican!,” a nationally syndicated and award-winning column. His most recent book is “Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America.”  http://www.askamexican.net/

 

Curandero

We go to the San Francisco Bay Area to meet Charles Garcia, founder of the California School of Traditional Hispanic Herbalism. Garcia is a third generation curandero, a traditional healer. He treats the sick with tinctures, vinegars, and other concoctions made of plants, many of which he grows or harvests in the outdoors.

Reporter Lisa Morehouse tagged along with Garcia to find out what it’s all about.

Our series RadioNature is funded by the REI Foundation.

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From Farm Worker to Farm Owner

Karina Canto is pulling her red beets from the soil at a farm in California’s Salinas Valley. She’s a recent graduate of ALBA, the Agriculture and Land-based Training Association located in the Central Valley, that’s helping turn farm workers into farm owners and operators. It’s a unique program that has sparked a growing trend across the country.
Efren Avalos also graduated from the program.He owns and runs Avalos Organic Farm – A 17-acre plot of rich farmland located in the ranching and farming community of Hollister, California. We met up with both Karina, and Efren to find out about the journey of becoming farm owners and how it’s changed their lives.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Opera en la Calle

In recent years Tijuana has become synonymous with grim murders and the violent drug war. But cultural workers there are trying to change that image and showcase Tijuana’s vibrant communities of artists and great restaurants. One shining example is the Festival “Opera en la calle” that recently celebrated its eighth year. It is a celebration, which started as a small event in one of Tijuana’s oldest neighborhoods, Colonia Libertad. It has grown through the years, and this summer it drew over 10,000 opera fans, some of the best singers in this quarter of the continent, and numerous art booths, food stands, and costumed performers. Reporter Jon Beaupré was there and brings us a taste of it.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

El Bulli-The Last Supper

El Bulli is one of the world’s most famous restaurants located two hours north of Barcelona. And after more than 45 years, it’s closing its doors. 20 years ago, chef and owner Ferran Adria introduced what’s called “Molecular Gastronomy” – food full of foams, spheres and liquid nitrogen. Known for his innovative culinary style, he’s had a huge influence on the avant-garde culinary world. Correspondent Evelyn Maturana was one of the lucky few who dined there before it closed. She takes us behind the scenes and finds out what’s next for this famous chef.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Healthy Food for California Farm Workers

California’s Central Valley, also known as the greatest garden in the world, has by far the highest agricultural production in the country. But ironically, those who work in “the garden,” often don’t benefit from the fresh fruits and vegetables they harvest.

A big portion of the farm workers in the area are Latino and many of their families suffer from health and obesity problems. In a recent survey of California’s farm workers, 45% said they had trouble getting enough healthy food in their diet. Why is this happening?

Reporter Pauline Bartolone traveled to Fresno – the most agriculturally productive county in the nation, to get some answers.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

This feature was produced through the California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowships, a program of the Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism at the University of Southern California.

Watch videos from Central Valley residents. Shot by Russel A. Daniels and produced by Pauline Bartolone.

Susana Cruz explains some of the challenges with getting healthy food in Fresno, CA.

Stuart Woolf on obstacles to Regional Food Systems in the Central Valley.

A Chicana at the Top of the World

Roxy Cruz de Hoyos was born and raised in East Los Angeles. In a predominantly Latino high school, she always stood out as fair-skinned. At Pitzer College, she appeared tan. And now, in the remote Himalayan villages of Nepal, Roxy is even told she looks Nepali! She’s studying the agriculture of Nepal, and finding out first hand just how much work goes into the food that humans eat. Reese Erlich brings us her story.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

A Story About Gratitude & Family

Writer Julia Alvarez lives in Vermont, a state with a rich history of rural life. Spend any time on a family-owned farm, though, and you begin to realize just how difficult the work is, and how thin the margin is between success and failure.

A family-owned dairy farm is the setting for the novel Return To Sender. It tells the story of Tyler, an eleven year old boy with a passion for astronomy and his growing friendship with the children of Mexican farmworkers who labor on his family’s farm.

It’s a story about family, and the land, and borders, and gratitude — and we thought it was an excellent story to bring you on this holiday weekend.

Among several other awards, Return To Sender is the recipient of the 2010 Pura Belpré Award, presented by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association. It is named after Pura Belpré, the first Latina librarian at the New York Public Library and it is presented each year to a Latino/Latina writer and illustrator who best portray, affirm, and celebrate Latino cultural experiences in outstanding works of literature for children and youth.

Community Gardens in Cincinnati

The traditional fall harvest is always a boon to local farmers markets. But at Cincinnati’s Findlay Market, the season has something of a twist. In an effort to meet the growing demand for locally grown produce, the Findlay Market received a USDA grant to help create the Cultivating Healthy Entrepreneurs and Farmers (CHEF) program. The program helps turn urban lots and empty city spaces into community gardens. And this season was the first fall where these farmers sold their goods at the farmers market.

Earlier this summer, local producer Daniel Denvir caught up with some of these urban farmers and sent this report.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Watch a slideshow as you listen:

Cincinnati’s Community Gardens from NPR's Latino USA on Vimeo.


Web Extra – Latino Farmers v. USDA

In the landmark Pigford v. Glickman class action lawsuit, some 15,000 Black farmers sued the federal government for systematic discrimination when it game to allocating USDA farm loans vital to seasonal farmers. The government settled that suit for $1 Billion and are now looking for another $1.25 Billion to cover additional claimants.

But despite the fact that Latino farmers, especially in South Texas, faced very similar discrimination in the same loan program, a federal judge has ruled that the Latino farmers cannot be given class action status, severely complicating the case.

Reporter Wade Goodwyn reported this story recently for NPR.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Here is a link to his original story.

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