Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

Novela approaches to diabetes

Treason is at the heart of the telenovela Retos para una vida saludable. But instead of a swarthy Romeo, the threat is sweet, salty and fatty foods. University of Massachusetts Medical School Associate Professor Milagros Rosal, PhD, and her colleagues developed the soap as part of the Lawrence Latino Diabetes Prevention project, a $2.6 million, federally funded intervention to help Latinos in Lawrence, Massachusetts prevent and manage diabetes.

This story is produced by Amy Mayer and mixed by Jones Audio Productions. It’s part of a year-long series examining health issues facing Latinos. Latino USA’s year-long look at Latinos and Health is made possible by funding from Pfizer Helpful Answers®, a family of patient assistance programs for the uninsured and underinsured who need help getting Pfizer medicines.


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Amy Mayer spent a year-and-a-half in Buenos Aires after college, before returning to the United States. She has reported on a variety of subjects literally from the far north (Alaska) to the far south (Australia and Argentina). She has been a reporter, producer, and host at NPR member stations and has produced freelance stories for a variety of programs and networks. In 2011, she produced the hour-long documentary Peace Corps Voices. Her print work has appeared in the New York Times, Boston Globe, Real Simple and many other publications.

Taco USA

Author and columnist Gustavo Arellano visits a new-school taco truck in Irvine, California, and explains how it is only the latest example of the long-standing American love affair with Mexican food.   Arellano also speaks with Latino USA’s Maria Hinojosa about his new book “Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America.”


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Gustavo Arellano

is editor of the OC Weekly, an alternative newspaper in California. Gustavo also writes “¡Ask a Mexican!,” a nationally syndicated and award-winning column. His most recent book is “Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America.”  http://www.askamexican.net/

 

Curandero

We go to the San Francisco Bay Area to meet Charles Garcia, founder of the California School of Traditional Hispanic Herbalism. Garcia is a third generation curandero, a traditional healer. He treats the sick with tinctures, vinegars, and other concoctions made of plants, many of which he grows or harvests in the outdoors.

Reporter Lisa Morehouse tagged along with Garcia to find out what it’s all about.

Our series RadioNature is funded by the REI Foundation.

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From Farm Worker to Farm Owner

Karina Canto is pulling her red beets from the soil at a farm in California’s Salinas Valley. She’s a recent graduate of ALBA, the Agriculture and Land-based Training Association located in the Central Valley, that’s helping turn farm workers into farm owners and operators. It’s a unique program that has sparked a growing trend across the country.
Efren Avalos also graduated from the program.He owns and runs Avalos Organic Farm – A 17-acre plot of rich farmland located in the ranching and farming community of Hollister, California. We met up with both Karina, and Efren to find out about the journey of becoming farm owners and how it’s changed their lives.

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Opera en la Calle

In recent years Tijuana has become synonymous with grim murders and the violent drug war. But cultural workers there are trying to change that image and showcase Tijuana’s vibrant communities of artists and great restaurants. One shining example is the Festival “Opera en la calle” that recently celebrated its eighth year. It is a celebration, which started as a small event in one of Tijuana’s oldest neighborhoods, Colonia Libertad. It has grown through the years, and this summer it drew over 10,000 opera fans, some of the best singers in this quarter of the continent, and numerous art booths, food stands, and costumed performers. Reporter Jon Beaupré was there and brings us a taste of it.

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El Bulli-The Last Supper

El Bulli is one of the world’s most famous restaurants located two hours north of Barcelona. And after more than 45 years, it’s closing its doors. 20 years ago, chef and owner Ferran Adria introduced what’s called “Molecular Gastronomy” – food full of foams, spheres and liquid nitrogen. Known for his innovative culinary style, he’s had a huge influence on the avant-garde culinary world. Correspondent Evelyn Maturana was one of the lucky few who dined there before it closed. She takes us behind the scenes and finds out what’s next for this famous chef.


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Healthy Food for California Farm Workers

California’s Central Valley, also known as the greatest garden in the world, has by far the highest agricultural production in the country. But ironically, those who work in “the garden,” often don’t benefit from the fresh fruits and vegetables they harvest.

A big portion of the farm workers in the area are Latino and many of their families suffer from health and obesity problems. In a recent survey of California’s farm workers, 45% said they had trouble getting enough healthy food in their diet. Why is this happening?

Reporter Pauline Bartolone traveled to Fresno – the most agriculturally productive county in the nation, to get some answers.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

This feature was produced through the California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowships, a program of the Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism at the University of Southern California.

Watch videos from Central Valley residents. Shot by Russel A. Daniels and produced by Pauline Bartolone.

Susana Cruz explains some of the challenges with getting healthy food in Fresno, CA.

Stuart Woolf on obstacles to Regional Food Systems in the Central Valley.

A Chicana at the Top of the World

Roxy Cruz de Hoyos was born and raised in East Los Angeles. In a predominantly Latino high school, she always stood out as fair-skinned. At Pitzer College, she appeared tan. And now, in the remote Himalayan villages of Nepal, Roxy is even told she looks Nepali! She’s studying the agriculture of Nepal, and finding out first hand just how much work goes into the food that humans eat. Reese Erlich brings us her story.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

A Story About Gratitude & Family

Writer Julia Alvarez lives in Vermont, a state with a rich history of rural life. Spend any time on a family-owned farm, though, and you begin to realize just how difficult the work is, and how thin the margin is between success and failure.

A family-owned dairy farm is the setting for the novel Return To Sender. It tells the story of Tyler, an eleven year old boy with a passion for astronomy and his growing friendship with the children of Mexican farmworkers who labor on his family’s farm.

It’s a story about family, and the land, and borders, and gratitude — and we thought it was an excellent story to bring you on this holiday weekend.

Among several other awards, Return To Sender is the recipient of the 2010 Pura Belpré Award, presented by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association. It is named after Pura Belpré, the first Latina librarian at the New York Public Library and it is presented each year to a Latino/Latina writer and illustrator who best portray, affirm, and celebrate Latino cultural experiences in outstanding works of literature for children and youth.

Community Gardens in Cincinnati

The traditional fall harvest is always a boon to local farmers markets. But at Cincinnati’s Findlay Market, the season has something of a twist. In an effort to meet the growing demand for locally grown produce, the Findlay Market received a USDA grant to help create the Cultivating Healthy Entrepreneurs and Farmers (CHEF) program. The program helps turn urban lots and empty city spaces into community gardens. And this season was the first fall where these farmers sold their goods at the farmers market.

Earlier this summer, local producer Daniel Denvir caught up with some of these urban farmers and sent this report.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Watch a slideshow as you listen:

Cincinnati’s Community Gardens from NPR's Latino USA on Vimeo.


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