Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Holidays’ Category

#1351 – Do They Know It’s Mex-mas?

Latino USA’s Christmas edition runs the gamut of holiday emotions, from the difficulty of putting up with your family to stories of growing up with the name Jesús. Photojournalist Donna DeCesare helps us to remember the less fortunate—victims of war and gang violence. We visit with The King: El Vez, of course, and take a listen to a Latin Christmas mixtape. Producer Daisy Rosario tells us millenials are doing just fine in our regular News or Noise feature, and our Dearly Deported series continues, with a story from Mexico City.

 

Frank Perry/AFP Photo

 

Growing Up Jesús

In Latin America, it’s a name like any other. But here in the U.S., Jesús is a name that could still raise an eyebrow. So Latino USA producer Michael Simon Johnson spoke with a handful of Jesúses to find out what it’s like to grow up with the holiest name in the book.

 

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michael-johnson-headshot-150x150Michael Johnson was born and raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  He spent most of his childhood making music and groaning when his parents put on NPR in the car. So naturally he graduated from Emerson College with a degree in Sound Design, moved to New York and made his way into public radio. As an engineer, he has worked for Afropop Worldwide, WNYC’s Radio Rookies, and Jazz at Lincoln Center. He commits much of his time to working on radio and multimedia projects but can often be found playing the bass, rock climbing, and traveling.

The Return Of The Queen

One of the toughest things about Christmas? Putting up with your family.

Writer Michele Carlo, author of the memoir Fish Out of Agua: My Life on Neither Side of the Subway Tracks tells us about watching, or trying to watch, a movie with her mother in a story she calls “The Return of the Queen.”

Carlo is a writer and performer who you may remember from out first hour long episode where she shared a school story with us. Listen for her on future episodes of Latino USA.

DISCLAIMER: In her story, Michele Carlo refers to a conversation in the mid-1980s where she told her mom that Rock Hudson was not only gay, but that he had married Jim Nabors. This is an urban myth. Jim Nabors did marry his long time partner Stan Cadwallader in January 2013.

imgres Michele Carlo is a writer/performer and comedic storyteller who has lived in four of the five boroughs of New York City and remembers when a slice of pizza cost fifty cents. Her stories have been published in Mr. Beller’s Neighborhood’s Lost & Found: Stories From New YorkChicken Soup For The Latino Soul and SMITH Magazine.

 

 

 

 

 

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Jarrod Carruthers 

Pavochón: Puerto Rican-style Turkey

When reporter Von Diaz was a girl celebrating Thanksgiving in Puerto Rico, her abuela ruled the kitchen. Each year she created a magical dish called a pavochón, a turkey cooked like a traditional Puerto Rican pork roast. This year, she tries to recreate the dish with her grandmother’s help.

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Von Diaz is a multimedia journalist based in New York City. Her reporting focuses on immigration, Cuba, and LGBT issues. She was born in Puerto Rico and raised in Atlanta, GA.She has published her work on PRI’s The World, WNYC, and New American Media.

Al & Lalo: El Día De Los Muertos Edition

Lalo Alcaraz and Al Madrigal find the funny in death as they return for their regular segment just in time for the Day of the Dead.

 Photo Courtesy of Lalo Alcaraz.

Extended content:

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MADRIGAL-300x168A correspondent on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart” since 2011, Al Madrigal has been named Best Stand-Up Comedian by the HBO/U.S. Comedy Arts Festival and his material dubbed “dynamic” by The New York Times. His unique, spontaneous and fast-paced lyrical storytelling style has made him a regular on television with numerous appearances on Comedy Central including his own half-hour Comedy Central Presents Special.

 

 

 

Lalo_hs-150x150Lalo Alcaraz is the creator of the first nationally-syndicated, politically-themed Latino daily comic strip,“La Cucaracha,” seen in scores of newspapers including the Los Angeles Times. He is also co-host of KPFK Radio’s popular satirical talk show, “The Pocho Hour of Power,” and co-founded the political satire comedy group Chicano Secret Service. His work has appeared in major publications around the world and he has won numerous awards and honors. Alcaraz received his Bachelor’s degree from San Diego State University, and earned his master’s degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a faculty member at Otis College of Art & Design in Los Angeles. Alcaraz was born in San Diego and grew up on the border.

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: CUTTING CHICAGO SCHOOLS

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, a look into elementary schools being shut down by Chicago officials, leaving many people angry and upset. And for this week’s “News Or Noise?”, Disney bows to Latino online mobilization after it tries to trademark “Dia de los Muertos.” Finally, we go to Tijuana, Mexico, where women roller derby fanatics give life to a fast growing sport.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

DIA DE LOS TRADEMARKS, “NEWS OR NOISE?”

When Disney tried to trademark “Dia de los Muertos” for their new movie merchandise inspired by the Mexican holiday, Latinos went online and turned things back around. For this week’s “News or Noise?” Latino USA guest host Luis Antonio Perez speaks with Kety Esquivel, digital media strategist and Vice President for Fenton, about how Latinos online retaliated against the entertainment giant.

Illustration by Lalo Alcaraz; Image courtesy of Pocho.Com, where you can see the whole illustration. 

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KetyKety Esquivel leads the digital practice for Fenton’s Western region with nearly 20 years of experience in the private and public sectors. Her commentaries has been featured in stories on the Wall St. Journal, HITN, PBS, CNN, Televisa and Univision. She also served as the New Media Manager for the National Council of La Raza and the interim CEO for Latinos in Social Media.

Lalo_hs-150x150Lalo Alcaraz is the creator of the first nationally-syndicated, politically-themed Latino daily comic strip, “La Cucaracha,” seen in scores of newspapers including the Los Angeles Times. He is also co-host of KPFK Radio’s popular satirical talk show, “The Pocho Hour of Power,” and co-founded the political satire comedy group Chicano Secret Service. His work has appeared in major publications around the world and he has won numerous awards and honors. Alcaraz received his Bachelor’s degree from San Diego State University, and earned his master’s degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a faculty member at Otis College of Art & Design in Los Angeles. Alcaraz was born in San Diego and grew up on the border. He is married to a hard-working public school teacher and they have three extremely artistic children.

LeafferMarshall Leaffer is a copyright-law expert and professor at Indiana University’s Maurer School of Law.

 

This Week’s Captions: “You Crazy?” Latinos and Mental Health

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we dedicate the entire show to the challenges that Latino youth face when dealing with mental health issues like anxiety, depression, peer pressure, and relationships. We hear the stories of three young Latinos coping with their culture while surviving the ups-and-downs of adolescence. But where do young Latinos turn for support? UC Davis professor Dr. Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola helps us put things in context.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

THREE KINGS DEMOCRACY

Host Maria Hinojosa talks about her memories of how Los Reyes Magos — the Three Wise Men — are celebrated in Mexico and in New York City’s East Harlem, where she is marching as a Queen in this year’s Three Kings’ Parade down Fifth Avenue.


Click here to download this week’s show.

DO THEY KNOW IT’S MEX-MAS?

For almost 25 years, Robert Lopez has been putting on an Elvis suit and becoming El Vez, the Mexican Elvis. Latino USA producer Nadia Reiman brings us a profile of the performer and takes us through his Merry Mex-Mas Christmas show.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Nadia Reiman has been a radio producer since 2005. Before joining the Latino USA team, Nadia produced for StoryCorps for almost five years. Her work there on 9/11 stories earned her a Peabody Award. She has also mixed audio for animations, one which won a DuPont award, hosted podcasts, and has guest hosted and produced for Afropop Worldwide on PRI. Nadia has also produced for None on Record editing and mixing stories of queer Africans, and worked on a Spanish language radio show called Epicentro based out of Washington DC. She graduated from Kenyon College with a double major in International Studies and Spanish Literature.

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