Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Identity’ Category

#1349 – Let’s Talk About Sex

In this week’s show, we focus on how Latinas think about themselves as sexual beings, and the constraints on their decisions about sex and reproduction. We hear from one woman whose decision to end a pregnancy brings up memories of a history of control of women of color’s fertility. We also examine how changes in funding of public health clinics in Texas have affected the choices of tens of thousands of women in the state. And we tell you the stories of some of the nearly two million people who have been deported during the Obama administration.

Photo Courtesy of Spike Walker, via Flickr

Pavochón: Puerto Rican-style Turkey

When reporter Von Diaz was a girl celebrating Thanksgiving in Puerto Rico, her abuela ruled the kitchen. Each year she created a magical dish called a pavochón, a turkey cooked like a traditional Puerto Rican pork roast. This year, she tries to recreate the dish with her grandmother’s help.

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Von Diaz is a multimedia journalist based in New York City. Her reporting focuses on immigration, Cuba, and LGBT issues. She was born in Puerto Rico and raised in Atlanta, GA.She has published her work on PRI’s The World, WNYC, and New American Media.

The Real Spelunkers Of Puerto Rico

Forget the beaches ­– some of Puerto Rico’s most stunning natural environments are actually located under your feet. Our producer Marlon Bishop visits one of the island’s 2000 caves with a team of hardened local spelunkers on a journey in search of indigenous cave art. After a long journey hacking through the jungle with machetes, they arrive at a rarely-visited cave where Taino shaman may have once performed the sacred cohoba ritual.

This story is part of the RadioNature series which explores the ways Latinos connect with nature. RadioNature is supported by the REI Foundation.

 

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Marlon Bishop_new headshotMarlon Bishop is a radio producer, writer, and reporter based in New York. His work is focused on music, Latin America, New York City and the arts. He is a frequent contributor to WNYC, Studio 360, The World, Latino USA and MTV Iggy. He is an Associate Producer for Afropop Worldwide.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Goths: Latinos On The Dark Side

Goth culture. Is it in? Is it out? Do they even care? Hear the stories of three Latinos who found a sense of community in Goth subculture while we try to answer the question of the ages: Why are Latinos obsessed with Morrissey? It’s not just the Pompadour.

Photo credit Suzy Exposito.

A2_HEADSHOT_NADIA_NOCREDITNadia Reiman has been a radio producer since 2005. Before joining the Latino USA team, Nadia produced for StoryCorps for almost five years. Her work there on 9/11 stories earned her a Peabody Award. She has also mixed audio for animations, assisted on podcasts for magazines, and program managed translations for Canon Latin America. Nadia has also produced for None on Record editing and mixing stories of queer Africans, and worked on a Spanish language radio show called Epicentro based out of Washington DC. She graduated from Kenyon College with a double major in International Studies and Spanish Literature

 

A2_LATINOGOTHS_SUZYEXPOSITO_HEADSHOT_NOCREDITSuzy Exposito is an illustrator, musician and writer living in Brooklyn, NY. She’s a staff contributor at Rookie Mag and Bitch Magazine, and volunteers at the Willie Mae Rock Camp For Girls. She’s living out her teen dream as the singer for feminist punk band Shady Hawkins. You can keep up with her on Twitter via @msmalcriada.

 

 

A2_LATINOGOTHS_HEADSHOT_PABLOPOFFALD_NOCREDITPablo Poffold is a 3D Artist who originally hails from a small town in Indiana. He was born in the U.S. to Chilean parents, and spent his childhood and adolescence drawing, painting, tinkering with digital art and audio software, and playing video games. He now works in the video game industry and feels very lucky to spend his daisy making art for a living. You can find his website at www. palboin3d.com.

This Week’s Captions: LOST & FOUND

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

On the first anniversary of Hurricane Sandy, Latino USA visits Staten Island, where the storm caused severe losses in immigrant communities. We’ll examine echoes of Sandy’s effects in Colorado’s recent floods, hear about people of Hatian descent who have lost their citizenship in the Dominican Republic, hear the tales of immigrants deported, saved from detention, and saving an indigenous Mexican language. Also: why radio is important, especially in emergencies, two musical oddysseys, and some words of wisdom from a Marine who recovers the long lost.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Losing Your Citizenship In The Dominican Republic

In the Dominican Republic, the Constitutional Court has retroactively revoked citizenship from anyone of Haitian descent dating back 84 years. Maria Hinojosa reports on how this change is affecting Dominican-born Haitians, and how the dynamic is playing out among Dominican and Haitian-Americans here in the U.S.

 

Zapotec Language Postcard

An indigenous language in Mexico called Zapotec is in danger of dying out. Its best chance of survival is, ironically, in Los Angeles.

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ruxandraRuxandra Guidi has a decade of experience working in public radio, print, and multimedia and has reported throughout California, the Caribbean, South and Central America, as well as Mexico and the U.S.-Mexico border region.

Ruxandra is a recipient of Johns Hopkins University’s International Reporting Project (IRP) Fellowship, which took her to Haiti for a series of stories about development aid and human rights in 2008. That year, she was also a finalist for the Livingston Award for International Reporting, given to U.S. journalists under 35 years of age.

After earning a Master’s degree in journalism from U.C. Berkeley in 2002, she got her break in public radio by assisting independent radio producers The Kitchen Sisters. A couple of years later, she did field reporting and production work for the BBC public radio news program, The World. Her stories focused on Latin America, human rights, rural communities, immigration, popular culture and music.
Most recently, Guidi was a border reporter for the Fronteras Desk, a collaboration between public radio stations throughout the Southwest and U.S.-Mexico border.

Throughout her journalism career, Guidi has also produced magazine features and radio documentaries for the BBC World Service in Spanish, National Public Radio, The Walrus, Guernica, Virginia Quarterly Review, World Vision Report, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s Dispatches and Marketplace radio programs.

She’s a native of Caracas, Venezuela.

This Week’s Captions: LIVE IN SACRAMENTO

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Latino USA is on the road and brings you this week’s show live from Sacramento. Host Maria Hinojosa interviews Californians about art and activism, writing and radio, and how the growth of California’s Latino population may indicate how the rest of the country adapts as Latinos become the largest minority.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Eddie Zazueta: Bay Area Rhymes

Nineteen-year-old Bay Area poet and rapper Eddie Zazueta writes about hip hop, street culture, and life in the Bay Area. He performed two original pieces for us at our live show in Sacramento.

Eddie opened with his song “Around the Sun,” where he speaks to the influence of hip-hop in his life:

And he closed with a performance of his poem “South Berkeley,” where he talks about life in the neighborhood where he grew up, and how it’s changing.

Photo courtesy of Youth Radio.

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Eddie Zazueta is a rapper and poet from Oakland, California. Eddie is a youth participant of Remix Your Life, a program of Youth Radio. Youth Radio is an Oakland-based media company that focuses on training youth in various forms of media production.

Forbidden Words and Forgotten Arts: Daniel Alarcón

Peruvian-born author Daniel Alarcón brings us a story about cultural adaptation and breaking interracial taboos, called “The Forbidden Word”. The story was originally produced by Radio Ambulante, the Spanish-language storytelling radio program he runs. He talks with Maria Hinojosa about the project, and discusses his new novel, titled “At Night We Walk in Circles”, about a young Latin American actor traveling with an avant-garde theater group. Special thanks to Radio Ambulante’s Martina Castro.

And here’s Radio Ambulante’s original “Palabra Prohibida/Forbidden Word” story, en español:

 

Daniel Alarcon (c) Adrian KinlochDANIEL ALARCÓN is author of “War by Candlelight”, a finalist for the 2005 PEN-Hemingway Award, and “Lost City Radio”, named a Best Novel of the Year by the San Francisco Chronicle and The Washington Post, among others. His writing has appeared in McSweeney’s, n+1, and Harper’s, and he has been named one of The New Yorker’s 20 under 40. He lives in San Francisco, California.

About Radio Ambulante: Radio Ambulante is a Spanish-language radio program that tells Latin American stories from anywhere Spanish is spoken, including the United States.

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