Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Identity’ Category

This Week’s Captions: BUEN PROVECHO!

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Latino USA delves into issues of food this week. We’ll take a look at the consequences of cuts to food stamps. We’ll express our love for plantains, tortillas, and breakfast tacos. We’ll hear from an undocumented Bay Area family that makes hundreds of tamales per week, get some reflection on food and health from performance artist Robert Karimi, and celebrate the Mexican heritage of huitlacoche. And Pauline Campos of Latina magazine joins Latino USA producer Brenda Salinas to dispense some advice.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Ode To The Plantain

Maria Hinojosa and producer Daisy Rosario sit down to chat about that staple of the Caribbean Latino’s diet, the plantain. Or, as Daisy calls it, “the Latino potato.”

 

Daisy_faceDaisy Rosario is a comedian, writer and producer of things from radio stories to live events. Recently graduated from the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, she also works with The Moth and the Upright CitizensBrigade Theatre. Daisy is an obsessive baseball fan.

Decolonize Your Tortilla!

Heads up, tortilla snobs! A pair of California professors behind the blog Decolonize Your Diet! show us how to make fresh homemade tortillas the traditional way. They’re not just tastier, they’re healthier.

Photo courtesy of Tena Rubio

contributors1

C1_Tena+Rubio+for+BioTena Rubio is an award-winning radio journalist based in San Francisco and Los Angeles. She’s a contributor to NPR’s Latino USA and is the former host & executive producer of the national public affairs show, Making Contact. A former TV news writer and producer, she is currently the Board Secretary for the Association of Independents in Radio (AIR).

 

C1_Tena+Rubio+for+Bio

Dr. Luz Calvo is an Associate Professor at California State University, East Bay
Dr. Catriona Rueda Esquibel is an Associate Professor, San Francisco State University

 

 

 

#Latino Problems

Being bicultural, multicultural, ambicultural…it can get complicated. We want to help out. We’ve teamed up with Latina’s Magazine’s advice columnist Pauline Campos for a new recurring segment we like to call #LatinoProblems. Our social media diva Brenda Salinas attended a conference in New York for Latinos in social media in called Latism, and they found plenty of people with plenty of questions.

 

Pauline

Pauline Campos is Latina Magazine’s advice & relationship columnist,Latino USA’s #LatinoProblems advice expert on NPR, editor of the ebook anthology, Strong Like Butterfly, and contributes to various websites. Pauline blogs three times a week at Aspiring Mama (or when she remember to take her Adderall) & is the founder of Girl Body Pride. Strong like Butterfly is currently available on Smashwords

 
contributors1

brenda headshot Brenda Salinas is a regio-montana by birth, tejana by choice. Before coming on board as an associate producer with Latino USA, she was awarded the highly competitive Kroc Fellowship at NPR. She has reportedpieces for Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Weekends on All Things Considered and for Houston Public Radio.

 

 

This Week’s Captions: ¡SALUD!

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

¡Salud! This week Latino USA discusses questions of health. First, how stress and poverty can make you sick, and the latest on teen pregnancy. Then, Al Madrigal and Lalo Alcaraz talk Obamacare, and we check in with California, with stories of youth and rural health. Host Maria Hinojosa shares her newfound healthy enthusiasm for soccer, we hear about the wisdom of boxing, and we raise a glass to Latinos working in wine. All this, and social media reactions to the PBS “Latino Americans” series.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Your Thoughts on PBS’ “Latino Americans”

Latino USA social media producer Brenda Salinas steps away from Twitter and into the recording booth to talk to host Maria Hinojosa. They discuss how social media has reacted to the PBS series “Latino Americans.”

 

brenda headshot

Brenda Salinas is a regio-montana by birth, tejana by choice. Before coming on board as an associate producer with Latino USA, she was awarded the highly competitive Kroc Fellowship at NPR. She is currently Latino USA’s resident social media diva.

 

This Week’s Captions: Questions of Authority

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week’s Latino USA examines’ questions of authority: who abuses it? How do you get it? And how do you maintain it? We’ll hear the stories of veterans and law enforcement. We’ll hear from a New York councilman from community asserting its power, discuss authority in media with students, a professor, and Univision anchor Jorge Ramos. And we’ll hear from two authorities in acting, Eugenio Derbez and Rita Moreno.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

NYC Election Milestone

Latinos have made their power felt in the New York City mayor’s race in a way not seen before, with celebrities like John Leguizamo and Junot Diaz endorsing candidate Bill DeBlasio. And in Brooklyn, the first Mexican-American ever will be on the city council. Politician Carlos Menchaca visits the Latino USA studios and talks about being not only the first Mexican-American councilmember, but also the first openly gay legislator to represent Brooklyn.

Photo courtesy Carlos2013.com

B2CarlosMenchaca_KaitiArchambault

Carlos Menchaca is a product of public schools and public housing, He is a native of El Paso, Texas raised by a single mother who immigrated from Mexico,  In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, Carlos worked day and night, bringing together local leaders, community groups, and everyday New Yorkers to coordinate response efforts and hold New York City, State, and Federal officials accountable.

As New York City Council member, Carlos will represent residents of the 38th Council District, which encompasses Sunset Park, Red Hook, Greenwood Heights, Borough Park, Windsor Terrace and Bay Ridge Towers.

 

 

Remembering Latino World War II Vets

Latino USA explores the contributions Latinos made to the fight during World War II, and we learn about one soldier who captured around 1,500 prisoners of war. We speak with Prof. Maggie Rivas-Rodríguez, who has collected over 600 stories of Latino WWII vets.

Photo courtesy Voces Project

And check out the Voces Oral History Project’s piece on Latino WWII vets:

Foto-Voz: Ramon Galindo from Voces Oral History Project on Vimeo.

C2WW2VETS_headshot_MaggieRivasMaggie Rivas-Rodriguez is an Associate Professor of Journalism at the University of Texas at Austin. She has more than 17 years of daily news experience, mostly as a reporter for the Boston Globe, WFAA-TV in Dallas and the Dallas Morning News. Her research interests include the intersection of oral history and journalism, U.S. Latinos and the news media. Since 1999, Rivas-Rodriguez has spearheaded the U.S. Latino and Latina Oral History Project “Voces”.

 

 

 

 

This Week’s Captions: Migration, Deportation, Intervention

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This episode of Latino USA examines government forces in our lives: first, the story of deportees who died in a California plane crash, whose identities were recently recovered. We’ll hear from the Mexico side of the border about the dangers faced by deportees. And, a Congressional proposal to end a US visa lottery. Also, how local governments are dealing with the federal “Secure Communities” program. And PBS’ Latino Americans documents the 500 year history of Latinos is the United States.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

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