Archive for the ‘Immigration’ Category

Casa Marienella: A Home For Asylum Seekers

An immigrant shelter in Texas offers non-violent asylum seekers a way out of detention.

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BrackenShotAmy Bracken is a Boston-based freelance reporter and radio producer. She’s had stories on PRI’s The World and in The Christian Science Monitor and Boston Globe. Tweet @brackenamy.

Turning Art into Activism: Favianna Rodriguez

You have probably seen her posters at immigrant rights marches around the country, but never knew who the artist was behind the captivating images. Artist, activist, and California native Favianna Rodriguez joins the live show to discuss where the personal meets the intersection of art and activism, and how she sees her own artwork fitting into the fight for immigrant rights. She also talks about how California issues have had a larger impact nationwide.

Below are the images Favianna talks about during her interview:

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A1_faviannaFavianna Rodriguez is a transnational interdisciplinary artist and cultural organizer. Her art and collaborative projects deal with migration, global politics, economic injustice, patriarchy, and interdependence . Rodriguez lectures globally on the power of art, cultural organizing and technology to inspire social change, and leads art workshops at schools around the country. In addition to her fine arts and community work, Rodriguez partners with social movement groups around the world to create art that’s visionary, inspirational, radical and, most importantly, transformational. When Favianna is not making art, she is directing CultureStrike, a national arts organization that engages artists, writers and performers in migrant rights. In 2009, she co-founded Presente.org, a national online organizing network dedicated to the political empowerment of Latino communities.

About Culture/Strike:

CultureStrike began in the summer of 2010 as a petition to honor the boycott of Arizona after that state passed its anti-immigrant law SB 1070. CultureStrike, which includes Wordstrike and Artstrike, seeks to organize artists, writers and other creative workers to strike back against anti-immigrant laws and attitudes. Their work is premised on the belief that culture, as the realm of ideas, images, and stories, is where people make sense of the world, find meaning and forge solidarity.

Immigration And Tech

It’s not just Latinos who are hoping the government shutdown ends and Congress can get back to work on immigration reform. The business community, and in particular the tech sector, wants to see legislation too. Brad Smith, Microsoft’s general counsel and executive vice president, talks with Maria Hinojosa about why he cares about immigration reform. He discusses how essential immigrant workers are for the tech sector, and the American economy as a whole.

Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons

And check out the extended interview here:

smith_printBrad Smith is Microsoft’s general counsel and executive vice president, Legal and Corporate Affairs. He joined Microsoft in 1993, and before becoming general counsel in 2002 he spent three years leading the LCA team in Europe, then five years serving as the deputy general counsel responsible for LCA’s teams outside the United States. He has played a leadership role locally and nationally on numerous charitable, diversity, business and legal initiatives. He recently was named by the National Law Journal as one of the 100 most influential lawyers in the United States.

 

The Cost of Inaction, A Call To Action

While immigration reform is stalled in Congress, over 1,000 people are deported each day. This human cost of inaction from legislators has spurred immigrant advocates to up the ante on the fight for immigrant rights. Latino USA talks with organizers about why – and how- they continue to push for action.

Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons

Jonathan Wolfe contributed reporting to this story.

israelIsrael Rodrigues Rubio is one of 30 DREAMers –undocumented youth brought to the US as children – who crossed the border on September 30th, 2013 as an act of civil disobedience organized by the National Immigrant Youth Alliance. He grew up in Durham, Nort Carolina and is a graduate of Columbia University. Despite all his successes, Israel’s undocumented status limited him in pursuing his dreams. By 2011, being a couple of months away from graduation, Israel settled on leaving for Mexico. In Mexico City, Israel had trouble integrating into a society he barely knew and was surrounded by increasing violence and political instability. In 2013 He decided he wanted to return to his family in the US.

DavidLeopoldDavid Wolfe Leopold is the founder and principal of David Wolfe Leopold & Associates Co. LPA. Mr. Leopold is the past president of the Washington, D.C.-based American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA www.aila.org), the premier bar association of immigration lawyers and professors in the U.S. He has served as AILA’s top liaison to the Department of Homeland Security’s key enforcement bureaus and co-founded the American Immigration Council’s Litigation Institute, a hands-on continuing legal education program focused on federal immigration litigation.

Gabriela Flora1Gabriela Flora is the Regional Project Voice Organizer of the American Friends Service Committee, Colorado. The organization is part of the Colorado Immigrant Rights Coalition, which succeeded in its fight to repeal SB-90, Colorado’s copycat Arizona-style show-me-your-papers law in 2012. In 2013 the Coalition had another victory – the approval of a law allowing for undocumented immigrants to access drivers’ licenses.

Pablo AlvaradoPablo Alvarado is an immigrant worker from El Salvador. In 2002, Alvarado became the national coordinator of the newly created National Day Laborer Organizing Network (NDLON), currently a collaboration of about three dozen community-based day laborer organizations. Under his guidance, NDLON works with local governments to help establish worker centers to move job seekers into places of safety.

 

 

 

 

Homemade Oakland Tamales

Carolina Santos and her mother, Rosa Oliva, make tamales, tacos, and all sorts of other food for office workers and other clients, who are usually in San Francisco. But in West Oakland, California, where they live, the corner stores that exist offer little of the fresh produce they have access to in the food business. Maria Hinojosa spends a day with them and brings us her report.

And click below to listen to Rosa Oliva share her recipe for mole Oaxaqueño, en español:

Deported Vets

Serving in the military can help immigrants gain U.S. citizenship. But vets who commit crimes may find themselves deported despite their service to the country. Latino USA speaks with a vet awaiting deportation and with filmmaker John Valadez, currently working on a documentary highlighting the cases of veterans who have been deported.

Photo courtesy Flickr

C1deportedvets_headshot_JohnValadezJohn Valadez is an award-winning director who has been producing documentaries for PBS for the last X years. He has been a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellow, A Rockefeller Fellow and is a founding member of the New York Chapter of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers. He has worked on projects for Carleton UK Television, Frontline, American Masters, CBC, TLC and HBO.

 

 

 

 

C1DeportedVets_headshot_CraigShaginCraig Shagin is a lawyer in private practice in Pennsylvania, where egis firm is active in immigration law. He is a member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association. He has authored numerous articles and books on various aspects of immigration law, including “Deporting Private Ryan: The Less Than Honorable Condition of the Non-Citizen in the United States Armed Forces.”

 

 

 

Deportee Plane

Reporter Valerie Hamilton tells the story of deportees who died in a 1948 plane crash. Their identities remained unknown until now. Also, Maria Hinojosa interviews Hamilton about the Woody Guthrie song “Deportee,” inspired by the crash. Additional reporting by Rebecca Plevin.

Photo: Tim Hernandez, right, and folk musician John McCutcheon, left, unveiling the new memorial dedicated to the victims of the deportee plane crash. Also unveiling the memorial were musician Lance Canales and Jaime Ramirez, the relative of two crash victims. Image courtesy of Rebecca Plevin/Valley Public Radio.

 

The plane crash victims:

Miguel Negrete Álvarez
Tomás Aviña de Gracia
Francisco Llamas Durán
Santiago García Elizondo
Rosalio Padilla Estrada
Tomás Padilla Márquez
Bernabé López Garcia
Salvador Sandoval Hernández
Severo Medina Lára
Elías Trujillo Macias
José Rodriguez Macias
Luis López Medina
Manuel Calderón Merino
Luis Cuevas Miranda
Martin Razo Navarro
Ignacio Pérez Navarro
Román Ochoa Ochoa
Ramón Paredes Gonzalez
Guadalupe Ramírez Lára
Apolonio Ramírez Placencia
Alberto Carlos Raygoza
Guadalupe Hernández Rodríguez
Maria Santana Rodríguez
Juan Valenzuela Ruiz
Wenceslao Flores Ruiz
José Valdívia Sánchez
Jesús Meza Santos
Baldomero Marcas Torres

Valerie. photoValerie Hamilton is an independent producer. She reports on issues on and around the U.S-Mexico border for U.S. and European public media. She’s based in Los Angeles.

TRUST Around the Country

Local governments in California, New Orleans, and Connecticut are implementing laws known as “TRUST acts,” limiting the scope of cooperation between local law enforcement and the federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency. We’ll hear pieces from Adrian Florido in California, Kate Richardson in New Orleans, and Lucy Nalpathanchil in Connecticut. We’ll also hear from a Connecticut TRUST act booster, state senate majority leader Martin Looney.

Photo: Josemaria Islas at a rally in New Haven, CT. His detention and pending deportation spurred the Connecticut TRUST act. Image courtesy of Unidad Latina En Acción.


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Senator Looney is in his sixth term as Senate Majority Leader of the General Assembly, having first been elected to that leadership post in 2003. He is also Chair of the Executive and Legislative Nominations Committee and Vice Chair of the Legislative Management Committee. Since being elected to the State Senate in 1993 and prior to his election as Majority Leader, he served six years as Senate Chair of the Finance, Revenue and Bonding Committee; Chairman of the Banks Committee; and one term as Ranking Member of the Judiciary Committee.

RebeccaPlevin Adrian Florido is a reporter for the Fronteras Desk where he covers the U.S.-Mexico border, immigrant and tribal communities, demographics, and culture. Before joining KPBS, he was a staff writer at Voice of San Diego. There he reported on San Diego neighborhoods, focusing on immigrant and under-served communities as well as development, planning, land use, and transportation.

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Kate Richardson is from Houston, Texas. She is an independent radio producer and contributor to WWNO in New Orleans. She helps run a community media project called The Listening Post and teaches Spanish at Delgado Community College.

 

nalpathanchil by Chion Wolf

Lucy Nalpathanchil is WNPR’s All Things Considered Host and Correspondent. She’s an award-winning reporter who has worked in several states since starting her career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh. Lucy now lives in beautiful New England where she reports on news stories in the Connecticut region and contributes to National Public Radio.  While at WNPR, her stories have focused on immigration including New Haven’s controversial ID card program, efforts for an in-state tuition law for undocumented students, and the “Becoming American” series

 

Dangerous Deportations

Mexican deportees are often dropped off in dangerous border cities at night. Reporter Maria Zamudio takes us to the Mexican city of Matamoros to see what they face when they arrive.

For Maria’s report in The Chicago Reporter, click HERE.

Image courtesy of Maria Zamudio.

 

mzamudio2Maria Zamudio is an award-winning investigative reporter. She joined The Chicago Reporter Magazine to cover immigration, labor and health in 2011. Prior to joining the investigative magazine, she spent three years in California working for several daily newspapers. She’s a bilingual reporter and blogger with experience producing radio and video stories. She been awarded many prestigious fellowships including  the New York Times fellowship in 2003. She graduated from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2007.

 

 

Diversity Visa

You might think immigration reform would make it easier for people to come to the U.S. But one proposal on the table, the elimination of the Diversity Visa program would actually have the opposite effect. Matt Laslo reports.

Image courtesy of Flicker.

MATT-LASLOBased on Capitol Hill, Matt Laslo is a freelance reporter who has been covering Congress, the White House and the Supreme Court for more than five years. While he has filed stories for more than 40 local NPR stations, his work has also appeared in The Atlantic, The Chattanooga Times Free Press, National Public Radio, The Omaha World-Herald, Pacifica Radio, Politics

 

 

Class of 2030: Dual Language in the South

A demographic surge of young Latinos is making their way through school, and by the time they’re out of college, the year will be 2030. In this first installment of our year-long series, Maria Hinojosa talks to teacher Elizabeth Bonitz about how dual language programs have become more popular in her town of Siler City, North Carolina.

Photo courtesy of Flickr

Lessons Learned: Immigration

Maria Hinojosa takes us through the lessons Latino USA has learned in twenty years of covering issues related to immigration.

 

Photo courtesy Flickr

 

9/11: Undocumented and Uncounted (2001)

At the time of the September 11th, 2001 attacks, undocumented immigrants formed an integral part of life in and around the World Trade Center. In this story from the Latino USA archives, Michelle Garcia reports on how the attacks and their aftermath challenged them.

Chevy Boat Cubans (2007)

In this 2007 story, we hear the story of how two Cubans in Miami plan to return home in an unusual vehicle.

Barack Obama (2006)

In 2006, Barack Obama was still a senator from Illinois, at a time when immigration reform was yet again on Congress’ agenda. Host Maria Hinojosa talked with him about his hopes for legislation, as well as deportation policy.

Image courtesy of Real Clear Politics

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