Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Latin America’ Category

This Week’s Captions: CAGED

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, Latino USA focuses on literal and metaphorical cages, from education programs and art within prison walls to kidnapping in Mexico. We’ll hear how one former inmate helps people transition to life on the outside. Also: one performance artist’s take on being paralyzed, a Cuban blogger, and life in a boxcar settlement. All this, and fighting police harrassment with Facebook.

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Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Blogging from Cuba

Orlando Luis Pardo Lazo is a Cuban blogger, activist, and editor of Cuba’s first digital magazine Voces. Maria Hinojosa talks to Pardo Lazo about blogging and writing in Cuba, the democratic potential of the Internet, and Pardo Lazo’s impressions during his first trip to the United States.

00570032Orlando Luis Pardo Lazo was born in Havana. He graduated with a degree in biochemistry and later became a writer, photographer and blogger. He founded the independent literary digital magazine Voces, Cuba’s first digital magazine. He is the other of numerous works of short fiction and manages the blog Lunes de Post-Revolución (in English – Post Revolution Mondays) as well as his photoblog Boring Home Utopics.

This Week’s Captions: LOST & FOUND

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

On the first anniversary of Hurricane Sandy, Latino USA visits Staten Island, where the storm caused severe losses in immigrant communities. We’ll examine echoes of Sandy’s effects in Colorado’s recent floods, hear about people of Hatian descent who have lost their citizenship in the Dominican Republic, hear the tales of immigrants deported, saved from detention, and saving an indigenous Mexican language. Also: why radio is important, especially in emergencies, two musical oddysseys, and some words of wisdom from a Marine who recovers the long lost.

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Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Losing Your Citizenship In The Dominican Republic

In the Dominican Republic, the Constitutional Court has retroactively revoked citizenship from anyone of Haitian descent dating back 84 years. Maria Hinojosa reports on how this change is affecting Dominican-born Haitians, and how the dynamic is playing out among Dominican and Haitian-Americans here in the U.S.

 

This Week’s Captions: LA LUCHA

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This edition of Latino USA is all about “la lucha”-the fight or struggle-from the ongoing efforts of business leaders and activists to reform immigration policy to songwriter Robi Draco Rosa’s fight against cancer. Also: fights on cable news, one Spanish-language newspaper that’s fought for a hundred years for Latinos, a small town’s struggle for clean water, and words of wisdom from a Mexican wrestler.

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Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Sabiduría: Luchadores

For a few words of wisdom this week, we turn to the luchadores, the masked wrestlers of Mexico. Jasmine Garsd brings us the words of one fighter who’s been combating opponents in the ring, and homophobia in society. This luchador is part of Los Exóticos, a group of fighters in drag based in Mexico City.

Jasmine Garsd was born in Argentina and hosts NPR’s Alt.Latino podcast. As a journalist she’s worked on the NPR programs Morning Edition, Talk of the Nation and Tell Me More. She has covered a wide variety of topics for radio including immigration issues.

Luchador Name Generator

Get in character for this week’s show, “¡LUCHA¡”

 

 

 

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Tell us your name on Twitter or Facebook, #LUSALUCHA.

 

The LUCHADOR Face-off

To get in character for this week’s show, ¡LUCHA!, we came up with our own fighting aliases. The best Luchador name gets a special prize. Help us choose a winner!

Create your free online surveys with SurveyMonkey , the world’s leading questionnaire tool.

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This Week’s Captions: Migration, Deportation, Intervention

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This episode of Latino USA examines government forces in our lives: first, the story of deportees who died in a California plane crash, whose identities were recently recovered. We’ll hear from the Mexico side of the border about the dangers faced by deportees. And, a Congressional proposal to end a US visa lottery. Also, how local governments are dealing with the federal “Secure Communities” program. And PBS’ Latino Americans documents the 500 year history of Latinos is the United States.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Santiago Postcard

Reporter Alexandra Hall sends us an audio postcard from Santiago, Chile, on the fortieth anniversary of the U.S. backed coup against Salvador Allende.

Image courtesy of Flickr.

 

Alexandra HallAlexandra Hall is an independent radio producer currently based in Santiago. She holds an M.A. in Latin American Studies from Columbia and a B.A. in Spanish from UC Santa Cruz. Alexandra is an intern with Chile’s finest news station, Radio Cooperativa, and the Co-host of NACLA Radio. She is best known for going rogue to get the story- from New England to the Southern Cone.

 

 

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