Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Law’ Category

Why Should Unions Support Immigration Reform?

You might not expect organized labor to advocate for immigration reform. But AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka tells us why he and his unions are making a push for reform to happen, and happen this year.

Photo courtesy of Flickr

Richard-L.Trumka-AFL-CIO-President_mediumRichard Trumka is the president of the AFL-CIO, a national federation of labor organizations.

 

 

This Bill Of Rights Is Going To Change My Life

Nannies, housekeepers, and elder care workers are excluded from federal benefits, but California is the third state after New York and Hawaii to enact a bill of rights for domestic workers. Reporter Emily Wilson talked to two of them.

Photo courtesy of Flickr.

contributors1

emilyheadshotEmily Wilson is a freelance reporter and producer in San Francisco. She teaches media literacy, math, and English to adults earning their GED at City College of San Francisco.

Organizing Domestic Workers In The Rest Of The Country

This year, California passed a Bill of Rights protecting domestic workers. New York and Hawaii have passed similar bills. But what is going on in the other 47 states? Andrea Cristina Mercado is the campaign director for the National Domestic Worker Alliance. She joins host Maria Hinojosa to talk about how the legacy of slavery makes it difficult for domestic workers to organize and how despite obstacles, the domestic worker movement has grown.

Photo courtesy of Dignidad Rebelde. 

C2_NatDomWorkers_Headshot_AndreaCristinaMercado_Credit_National Domestic Worker Association

Photo courtesy of National Domestic Workers Association.

Andrea Cristina Mercado is the daughter of South American immigrants, the mother of two small girls, and the new Campaign Director at the National Domestic Worker Alliance. For the past eight years Andrea has been organizing at Mujeres Unidas y Activas (MUA), a grassroots Latina immigrant women’s organization in the San Francisco Bay Area. She is one of the co-founders of the National Domestic Workers Alliance and has played a leadership role in building and coordinating the California Domestic Worker Coalition, a statewide effort to include domestic workers in labor laws.

Barack Obama (2006)

In 2006, Barack Obama was still a senator from Illinois, at a time when immigration reform was yet again on Congress’ agenda. Host Maria Hinojosa talked with him about his hopes for legislation, as well as deportation policy.

Image courtesy of Real Clear Politics

This Week’s Captions: The Border

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Latino USA spends this week on the U.S.-Mexico border. We’ll hear deported parents trying to bring their child back from the United States, a Mexican village along a re-opening border, and hear reviews of border crossings from Yelp.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Asylum from Violence

After the kidnapping and beheading of the police chief in a Mexican border town, no one dared to replace him. But Marisol Valles Garcia, a twenty-year-old mother and student took the post as police chief in one of the most violent regions in the world. Today, she and her family are seeking political asylum in the U.S. Andres Caballero reports.

Image courtesy of Flickr


Andrés Caballero has been an active contributor to Latino USA for more than a year. He holds a M.S. in Journalism from the Columbia University School of Journalism, and a B.S. in Political Science from Notre Dame De Namur University. He covers issues that affect Latinos across the U.S., and he has also contributed to New America Media, the Hispanic Link News Service in Washington D.C., and El Tecolote in San Francisco.

Cross-border Custody

Reporter Jill Replogle tells us the story of one deported couple trying to get their child back from the United States. In collaboration with the Fronteras: Changing America Desk, a public radio collaboration in the southwest focusing on the border, immigration and changing demographics.

Image courtesy of Fronteras: Changing America Desk

 

 Jill Replogle is based in San Diego and reports on the US-Mexico border, immigration, changing demographics and environment.

 

This Week’s Captions: IMMIGRATION & DOMA

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, Latino USA takes a look at the recent Supreme Court ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act and what it means for immigrant same-sex couples. Then, we explore the identity of people who are both Muslim and Latino. We’ll take a trip to Brazil to hear the accordion dance music known as forró. And Host Maria Hinojosa takes an Independence Day look at Lady Liberty’s immigration status.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Legalizing Love

On June 26th the US Supreme Court ruled the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional, paving the way for federal recognition of same-sex marriages and allowing Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender immigrant couples to apply for the same immigration benefits as straight couples. Pablo Garcia Gamez and Santiago Ortiz, a married couple from Queens, New York, discuss how the DOMA ruling has already changed their lives. Then, Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa speaks with Rachel Tiven, Executive Director of Immigration Equality, about the impact of the ruling.

Image courtesy of Immigration Equality/Judy G. Rolfe

 

To listen to more of Pablo and Santiago’s story, click HERE for the extended interview:

 

Santiago Ortiz and Pablo Garcia  Gamez
Santiago Ortiz and Pablo García Gamez have been together for 23 years. They married in Connecticut in 2011 and live in Elmhurst, Queens, New York. Santiago (left) was born in Manhattan’s Lower East Side to parents who migrated from Puerto Rico. Pablo (right) is a native of Venezuela, Caracas and has been living undocumented for over 20 years. He will now be able to apply for a green card as Santiago’s spouse. Once his immigration status is in order, he plans to begin teaching college Spanish.

Rachel Tiven is the Executive Director of Immigration Equality, a legal advocacy organization representing LGBTQ immigrants. Rachel received her law degree from Columbia Law School and her bachelor’s degree from Harvard.

 

This Week’s Captions: DECISIONS, DECISIONS AT THE SUPREME COURT

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, the U.S. Supreme Court decides on crucial cases for Latinos.

For “News or Noise?” we talk about unpaid internships and their effects on journalism. Then, visit a dual language program in Florida, the state where bilingual education began. Finally, ten years after the U.S Navy ceased its practice range bombings in Vieques, artists get together to raise money for a radio station that will help Viequenses cope with new challenges.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

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